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Chauncey M. Depew (search for this): chapter 11
nominated for Vice-President, 199. Coggeshall, James, loan to Greeley, 59. Compromise of 1850,151-163. Congdon, C. T., 72. Constitutionalist, Greeley's work for, 26. Cooper libel suits, 11, 68. Crandall, Miss, opposition to her plan for negro education, 132. Curtis, George William, 72. D. Dallas, vote on tariff, 121. Dana, Charles A., 72, 82, 105. Davis, Judge, David, candidate for presidential nomination, 235. Davis, Jefferson, Greeley on, 218, 220-222. Depew, C. M., anecdote of Greeley, 107. De Tocqueville on early American newspapers, 27. Douglas, Stephen A., in the Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163-165; Greeley favors for Senator, 178. Dred Scott decision, 168. E. Evening Post, 111, 1.5 note. Express news-gathering, 73-76. F. Farming, Greeley on, 91-93. Fillmore signs compromise bills, 160. Finances, Federal and State, Greeley on, in the New Yorker, 35-38. Fourierism, Greeley's belief in, 79-84; later views, 85; Fourier A
Samuel J. Tilden (search for this): chapter 11
political issue, 114; Greeley's early advocacy of protection, 115-118; Clay campaign of 1844, 119, 120; Polk's position, 121; R. J. Walker's views, 121; tariff vs. slavery, 161; part in the Liberal Republican campaign of 1872,232-234; Liberal Republican plank, 240; Greeley's acceptance of it, 246. Taylor, Bayard, 72, 96. Taylor, Gen. Z., Greeley's listless support of, 148-151; on admission of California, 157. Temperance, Greeley's views, 18, 172. Texas annexation, 137-148. Tilden, Samuel J., 116. Times, New York, started, 94. Tribune, New York, Greeley's estimate of, 56; his plan of, 58-60; capital to start with, 59; its birth and early struggles, 61; weekly and semi editions begun, 62, 63; price, 63; war with the Sun, 63; its news character, 65-67; growth of subscriptions and advertisements, 69, 70; source of its influence, 71; associate editors, 72; express news-gathering, 73-76; value of Greeley's isms, 76; Brisbane's contributions, 80; support of Association schem
of 1844, 119, 120; Polk's position, 121; R. J. Walker's views, 121; tariff vs. slavery, 161; part in the Liberal Republican campaign of 1872,232-234; Liberal Republican plank, 240; Greeley's acceptance of it, 246. Taylor, Bayard, 72, 96. Taylor, Gen. Z., Greeley's listless support of, 148-151; on admission of California, 157. Temperance, Greeley's views, 18, 172. Texas annexation, 137-148. Tilden, Samuel J., 116. Times, New York, started, 94. Tribune, New York, Greeley's estima; on Tyler's tariff bill veto, 114; Clay edition, 119; part in the antislavery contest, 123; on the Abolitionists, 129, 156; on fugitive slaves, 144; position on slavery question stated, 145, 147; on Texas annexation, 145-148; listless support of Taylor, 148, 149,151 ; rebuke of New York business interests, 149, 161 ; on Van Buren-Adams ticket, 151; on campaign of 1850, 157; on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; on Kansas-Nebraska question, 163-165; Virginia indictment of, 167; on Dred Scott de
Ripley, George, 72, 83. S. Scott, Gen. W., Tribune favors his nomination, 163. Schurz, Carl, part in Liberal movement in Missouri, 227, 228, 230; chairman Liberal national convention, 241. Secession, the right of, 184. Seward, William H., Greeley's complaint to, 173; dissolution of firm of Seward, Weed, and Greeley, 174-176; letter to Weed, 177; Greeley's objection to his nomination, 179; Secretary of State, 184; reply to Mercier, 193-195; on Greeley's negotiations. 196. Shepard, H. D.'s, Morning Post, 25. Slavery, Greeley's part in its abolition, 123; Abolitionists defined, 124; their erratic views, 125; early antislavery societies, 130; Northern attitude, 128-136; the Tribune's influence as an opponent of slavery, 133; Lovejoy's murder, 136; Texas annexation, 137-148; Supreme Court decision, 144; Greeley's rebukes of New York business interests, 149, 161; Greeley's attitude in Congress, 151; Compromise of 1850, 152-163; conference of Southern Congressmen, 154
Zacheus Greeley (search for this): chapter 11
kes of New York business interests, 149, 161; Greeley's attitude in Congress, 151; Compromise of 18cipation proclamation, 196-198. Socialism, Greeley's views, 79-86. Spirit of the Times (newsptualism, Greeley's views on, 89-91. Stage, Greeley's views on, 65. Story, Francis, 24. Sumne 1872,232-234; Liberal Republican plank, 240; Greeley's acceptance of it, 246. Taylor, Bayard, 7 admission of California, 157. Temperance, Greeley's views, 18, 172. Texas annexation, 137-14partment, 91; exposure of mileage abuse, 100; Greeley's thorough editing, 103; on Tyler's tariff bias annexationist, 141. V. Vallandigham, Greeley's reported correspondence with, 195. Van Buren, Martin, Greeley's thrust at, 51; tariff views, 111; Free Soil candidate , 127; on Texas quest Seward, 173-176; Seward's letter to, 177; on Greeley's letter to Seward, 182; defeats Greeley's chGreeley's chances for office, 182. Whig (daily newspaper), 47. Whig party, 1836 to 1840, 41-52; final def[52 more...]
R. D. Owen (search for this): chapter 11
Lincoln, Abraham, Greeley's preference for Douglas, 178; caution to Greeley, 186; Greeley's letter to, after Bull Run, 190-192; reply to Greeley's Prayer of Twenty Millions, 197; Greeley's opposition to his renomination, 199-202; part in Niagara Falls negotiation, 203-208; suppressed editorial on, 210; Greeley's final view of, 212, 213. Log Cabin (newspaper), how started, 50; its character, 50-52; big circulation, 52. Lottery ticket selling, 26. Lovejoy, E. P., murder of, 136. -, Owen, on emancipation proclamation, 198 note. M. Madisonian (newspaper), invitation to Greeley, 57. McElrath, T., partner in the Tribune, 62. Mercier, Greeley's approach to, 193. Mileage abuse, Greeley's attack on, 99-103. Missouri compromise, 127. Missouri, Liberal Republican movement in, 226-230. Morning Post, 25. N. Nebraska question, 163-165. Negro education, Northern opposition to, 132. Newspapers,--early, in the United States, 27; New York city in 1842, 58
Greeley on, 91-93. Fillmore signs compromise bills, 160. Finances, Federal and State, Greeley on, in the New Yorker, 35-38. Fourierism, Greeley's belief in, 79-84; later views, 85; Fourier Association formed, 81. Foxes' seances, 90. Fremont campaign of 1856, 167; nominated for President in 1864, 199. Frye, W. H., 72,106. Fugitive slaves, 144; compromise act, 160-163. Fuller, Margaret, 72, 82; member of Greeley's family, 88: contributions to the Tribune, 88, 89. G. Garr on Webster's 7th of March speech, 158; abandons Wilmot proviso, 159; on fugitive slave law, 161-163; favors Scott's nomination, 163; on Kansas-Nebraska contest, 163, 165; early attitude toward Republican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fremont's defeat, 167; Dred Scott decision, 168; Lecompton contest, 168; John Brown raid, 168; on office-holding editors, 171, 172, 175 ; desire for gubernatorial nomination, 172, 173, 176; advocacy of prohibition, 172; complaint to Seward, 173; letter
John Brown (search for this): chapter 11
epublican movement, 227, 228 ; candidate for presidential nomination, 235; withdrawal in favor of Greeley, 241-243. Brown, John, raid, 168. Bryant, William Cullen, 200, 248. C. Calhoun, John C., for Texas annexation, 142; Greeley's replylican party, 166, 178; attack by Rust, 166; on Fremont's defeat, 167; Dred Scott decision, 168; Lecompton contest, 168; John Brown raid, 168; on office-holding editors, 171, 172, 175 ; desire for gubernatorial nomination, 172, 173, 176; advocacy of pise of 1850, 152-163; conference of Southern Congressmen, 154-156; talk of disunion, 156,162; Dred Scott decision, 168; John Brown raid, 168; emancipation proclamation, 196-198. Socialism, Greeley's views, 79-86. Spirit of the Times (newspaper)7th of March speech, 158; on Kansas-Nebraska question, 163-165; Virginia indictment of, 167; on Dred Scott decision and John Brown's raid, 168; advocacy of the Maine law, 172; service to Seward, 174; on the right to secede, 184-187; office attacked
Elijah P. Lovejoy (search for this): chapter 11
on of the movement, 246, 247. Lincoln, Abraham, Greeley's preference for Douglas, 178; caution to Greeley, 186; Greeley's letter to, after Bull Run, 190-192; reply to Greeley's Prayer of Twenty Millions, 197; Greeley's opposition to his renomination, 199-202; part in Niagara Falls negotiation, 203-208; suppressed editorial on, 210; Greeley's final view of, 212, 213. Log Cabin (newspaper), how started, 50; its character, 50-52; big circulation, 52. Lottery ticket selling, 26. Lovejoy, E. P., murder of, 136. -, Owen, on emancipation proclamation, 198 note. M. Madisonian (newspaper), invitation to Greeley, 57. McElrath, T., partner in the Tribune, 62. Mercier, Greeley's approach to, 193. Mileage abuse, Greeley's attack on, 99-103. Missouri compromise, 127. Missouri, Liberal Republican movement in, 226-230. Morning Post, 25. N. Nebraska question, 163-165. Negro education, Northern opposition to, 132. Newspapers,--early, in the United States,
pathy with socialism, 79; support of Brisbane's Fourierism, 79-84; director of North American Phalanx, 81; discussion with Raymond, 84; later views on socialism, 84-86; acceptance of Graham's dietetic doctrine, 86; residence on the East River, 88; Margaret Fuller's views, 88, 89; opinion of spiritualism, 89-91; views on farming, 91-93; at Chappaqua, 92; sympathy with Ireland and Hungary, 93; as counselor-at-large, 94; his lectures, 95-97; member of Congress, 98-103, 151; visits to London and Paris, 104; how he edited the Tribune, 105; letters to Dana, 105, 106; experience with beggars, 106-108; editorial-room pictures, 108, 109; advocate of a protective tariff, 110-122; views of President Tyler, 113, 114; early prominence as a protection advocate, 115; his tariff principles, 116-118; support of Clay in 1844, 119, 120; plague of boils, 120; Clay his choice in 1848, 122, 148; part in the abolition of slavery, 123; party influence over, 125, 129; his idea of conservatism, 126; defense of
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