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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864.. Search the whole document.

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William H. McCartney (search for this): chapter 5
ght into cigars and twists. It was on the afternoon of the second or third day that the guns of a Confederate earthwork or small fort, plainly visible on the opposite ridge, began to play upon us, throwing shot over our guns to the lower ground, where were our shelters and baggage. The detachments were immediately called to their guns, which were loaded, and the compliments of our friends returned. The aiming of our guns, and the firing, were under the direction of Lieut. Commanding McCartney. There was a lively interchange of civilities for a half hour. The shots from the other side, for the most part, passed over us, striking the ground in the rear. We saw two of the shots sent by our guns, when aimed by the lieutenant commanding, fall, as it appeared to us, pat, within the Confederate earthwork. At all events, after the shots in question from our side, there was silence on the other. We were ordered to cease firing. On Sunday, June 8, on the ridge across the river, to
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 5
up and moved into camp upon the gray plain hard by. Yorktown, the first objective point of McClellan's expedition, which had preceded us some three weeks from Alexandria and had landed at FortresGen. Magruder, having under his command a force variously stated, from 5,000 to 13,000 men. McClellan reached the vicinity of the east bank of this stream April 4, 1862. He seems to have employedith growth of wood. At this moment over and beyond these bluffs, half-way to the James, where McClellan's advance had been stopped near Williamsburg by works called Fort Magruder, Gen. Hooker's divive been to intercept the Confederate force retiring from Yorktown, and to form a junction with McClellan's main army. A conversation audible to men in the vicinity of the speakers, between Gen. Franve remarked, comrades of the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Massachusetts were in our camp, that McClellan's main army in its advance from Yorktown had reached a point near Roper's Church on the Willia
A. T. A. Torbert (search for this): chapter 5
convey the idea that Jackson was to be reinforced in the valley; while really Gen. Lee was contemplating the withdrawal of that army to augment the already large force which, drawn from the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F,<
Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, 6th Maine. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. H. Brooks, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Davidson, 33d, 77th, 49th New York Volunteers, and 7th Maine Volunteers. Artillery. Ayres's F, 5th United States, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Mott's 3d New York Battery, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 Napoleons. Wheeler's E, 1st New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Kennedy's 1st New York Battery, 6 3-inch Ordnanc
e aperture seemed ample for the purpose. A comrade who observed the attempt, said that he himself, when in a similar condition, had driven a team down a flight of steps in a court leading from one street to another in a northern city. He declared that the descent seemed to him at the time only a gentle slope. On a bright, balmy April afternoon, characteristic of that month in eastern Virginia, we broke camp, moving through the town, passing the Marshall house where Ellsworth fell, and Suttles's warehouse, whence Anthony Burns, a few years before, fled from servitude; we embarked from a wharf east of the warehouse. Our commander and his lieutenants sailed in a steamboat which bore our pieces and caissons, and convoyed a fore and aft schooner which carried the non-commissioned officers and privates, and on whose decks our horses were picketed from the galley to the forecastle. In the hold where we slept were also hay and grain for our steeds, rations for the boys, and some ammun
John Newton (search for this): chapter 5
rom the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New
recall the bathing in the bay, and the gathering of oysters from the flats. We were upon parade, Sunday forenoon, May 4, when a general's orderly approached Capt. Platt, Company D, Second United States Artillery, chief of the artillery brigade of our division. After a moment's interval, the latter rode up to Capt. Porter, who was in position in front of his company; some words were exchanged, and Capt. Platt rode away. Our commander turned to his chiefs of sections, and with a smile exclaimed: Yorktown's evacuated! By piece from the right, front into column! The remainder of the day was a busy season, being steadily employed in embarking the army corand 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and
Richard Arnold (search for this): chapter 5
f the corps; the dark haze through which surrounding objects were dimly viewed,—all tended to make the half hour preceding our departure a singularly impressive period in our history as a company. But the calm bearing and kindly manner of Col. Richard Arnold, Fifth United States Artillery, then inspector general of the corps, who superintended the embarkation of the artillery and its disposition on the transports, were inspirational, and the details were completed with surprising absence of fr, must have been to intercept the Confederate force retiring from Yorktown, and to form a junction with McClellan's main army. A conversation audible to men in the vicinity of the speakers, between Gen. Franklin on the side of a steamboat and Col. Arnold on a barge alongside, rendered it probable to listeners that up to that moment no scheme for landing the artillery had been projected, unless in the mind of the colonel. But he proved himself then and afterward fertile in expedients, and he b
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 5
fs, half-way to the James, where McClellan's advance had been stopped near Williamsburg by works called Fort Magruder, Gen. Hooker's division was in action, stoutly resisted by Magruder's force. Ultimately the Confederate position was flanked by Gen. Hancock of Sumner's corps. But during nine hours, while we were sailing up the York, the ever brave men of Hooker's command, among whom were the First and Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteers, fought desperately and lost heavily; the Federal loss du have been delayed so that it was five o'clock before Kearney's division arrived, and after dark before the arrival of Gen. Hooker from White Oak Swamp. During these days, while the movements of the left wing upon the south side of the river weree night, Kearney's, Couch's, and a portion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouacked in their rear. Sedgwick remained relatively in the same position as at dark; all his artillery that could be
Ultimately the Confederate position was flanked by Gen. Hancock of Sumner's corps. But during nine hours, while we were sailing up the York,onged to Gen. Porter's Corps (Fifth), which, with the corps of Generals Sumner and Franklin (Sixth), was to form the right wing and to proceehich they culminated, the right wing was still upon the north side, Sumner's Corps being upon the left of Franklin, six miles above Bottom's Bps, but he was obliged to fall back one half mile; here learning of Sumner's approach, he at once formed a line facing Fair Oaks and prepared he force in good order within the Federal lines. At six o'clock Gen. Sumner reached Gen. Couch's position, with Sedgwick's division; before them, though repulsed with heavy loss upon our side. At length Gen. Sumner ordered a charge, which was made with such vim and effectivenessaid that it was at this moment that Gen. Joe Johnston was wounded. Sumner's other division now appeared upon the scene, but night brought ces
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