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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. Search the whole document.

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D. Webster (search for this): chapter 5
illed the year at which we have now arrived with the emptiest of empty words. On January 29, an Anti-Texas Convention was held in Lib. 15.18. Faneuil Hall. Mr. Webster united in the Convention, and consulted with and assisted Stephen C. Phillips, Charles Allen, and Charles Francis Adams, in preparing the Address of the Conventd remarks which the daily press pronounced Lib. 15.23. treasonable. He recalled a similar convention on the admission of Missouri, whose protest was embodied by Webster in an address. That movement ended in words, words. Did they mean, asked Mr. Garrison, to act that farce over again? Charles Francis Adams objected to jeopardi the illusion that Lib. 15.170. the entrance of Texas into the Union would make slavery a national institution as never before, and expose it to attack as such. Webster, accusing the Liberty Party Lib. 15.182. (by its defeat of Clay) of having procured annexation, hoped, or professed to hope, the consummation might yet be averte
Henry Clay (search for this): chapter 5
ention in October withdrew from the opposition, and left Lib. 15.162. the Constitutional question to the Supreme Court of the United States! Governor Slade of Vermont could no longer urge his State to take, unsupported, an unrelenting attitude, and sought comfort in the illusion that Lib. 15.170. the entrance of Texas into the Union would make slavery a national institution as never before, and expose it to attack as such. Webster, accusing the Liberty Party Lib. 15.182. (by its defeat of Clay) of having procured annexation, hoped, or professed to hope, the consummation might yet be averted; as Charles Francis Adams, seeing Lib. 15.185; cf. 206. nothing further left, and disregarding the example of Florida, vainly looked for some modification of the pro-slavery Constitution of Texas. Abbott Lawrence and Nathan Appleton, ex-members of Congress, not only desisted from opposition On March 25, 1837, Mr. Lawrence wrote to his constituents: The independence of this infant nation [T
tionists? Eliza Lee Follen. There can be no doubt that the acquisition of Texas hastened the overthrow of the Slave Power, by making it over-confident, by fostering dreams of an indefinite Southern expansion in case of separation from the North, by training the hot youth of the South to arms when Mexico was invaded and reduced—yet training not only Jefferson Davis, Lee, Stonewall Jackson, the two Johnstons, and so many other future chiefs of the Confederate army, but also Grant, Thomas, Meade, Hancock, and their fellow-emancipationists of the Federal army; above all, by enlarging with the national domain the points of contact between free and slave institutions, involving fresh conflicts and compromises—perpetual irritation of the national sore. Thomas Corwin correctly predicted that, in the event of a cession of territory by Mexico to the United States, the question of the further extension of slavery must arise in a form which would necessarily array the North and the South
Helen Frances Garrison (search for this): chapter 5
lemen, not abolitionists, were such as caused Garrison to be mobbed ten years ago, and such as we thWe always said it would, and were laughed at. Garrison grew popular and was Ms. Feb. 24, 1845. chosended in a golden G. S. Hillard. shower; but Garrison's fell in fiery rain. It seemed doubtful, atnded in words, words. Did they mean, asked Mr. Garrison, to act that farce over again? Charles Frain adjourned Lib. 15.163. till October 21. Mr. Garrison spoke on both occasions, Lib. 15.163, 174.e. Calhoun wants it at one end of the Union— Garrison wants it at the other. It is written in the ists. Apparently, Ms. Mar. 1, 1845. wrote Mr. Garrison to Richard Webb, with reference to annexatinotified the same correspondent in regard to Garrison—He is in good spirits,. . . . as he always ist found a cordial welcome in the Liberator. Mr. Garrison recalled his first visit to England in 1833n Phonographic Society. Of this Society Mr. Garrison became an officer, and his Lib. 15.132. fr[14 more...]<
ve of truth. Towards midsummer the art of phonography alighted in Boston, with Andrews and Boyle for its apostles and Stephen Pearl Andrews. teachers. It found a cordial welcome in the Liberator. Mr. Garrison recalled his first visit to England in 1833, Lib. 15.110. and his regret that his ignorance of any language but his own overruled his desire to cross to the Continent; how, on his second visit, in 1840, the need of a universal language for mankind was again impressed upon him at Bowring's table, when he could hold no conversation Ante, 2.378. directly with Isambert and the other French delegates to the World's Convention, so that at the Crown and Anchor Ante, 2.384. soiree he had to testify against the existing diversity of tongues among mankind, to him so unnatural, fraudulent, afflictive, insupportable. Phonography seemed a long stride towards the desideratum, as promising to render each national dialect simple and exact, and make easy the transition from many rectifi
Joseph C. Lovejoy (search for this): chapter 5
spectable number of the Convention were in favor of a dissolution of the Union in the event of the annexation of Texas. Mr. Garrison's share in the proceedings was effective in two particulars. He secured for the Convention a chance to criticise the address before it was issued, and he had the Committee of Correspondence enlarged so as to include members of the Democratic Party. His speech, delivered in the evening, was to second a motion made in the Lib. 15.18. afternoon by the Rev. Joseph C. Lovejoy of Cambridge (a brother of the martyr), of this tenor: that the threatened extension of the area of slavery would release the North from all obligations to that piratical institution, whether, to return fugitive slaves or to suppress insurrections. He was received, on rising, with deafening cheers, and offered an additional resolution, in these words: That, in view of the fact that two branches of the Government have already declared their wish and concurrence in the project
Salmon P. Chase (search for this): chapter 5
words, words. Did they mean, asked Mr. Garrison, to act that farce over again? Charles Francis Adams objected to jeoparding united action by any such radical proposition, and both the Lovejoy and Garrison resolutions were laid on the Lib. 15.18. table. Months passed, during which inaction on the part of the North paved the way to the catastrophe, and sapped the Lib. 15.82. courage of the resistants—the political and practical resistants. William H. Seward, in a public letter to Salmon P. Chase, submitted in advance to the inevitable Lib. 15.113. annex ation of Texas, repudiating disunion. His counter measure was to enlarge the area of freedom—as if the South did not provide for that by coupling the admission of a slave State with that of a free State. Already, in February, Florida had been thus admitted into the Union, paired with Lib. 15.34, 39. Iowa, in spite of the intense Northern feeling against more slave States aroused in the case of Texas; in spite, too, of the
Well, Texas, you'll see, is coming in. We always said it would, and were laughed at. Garrison grew popular and was Ms. Feb. 24, 1845. chosen a delegate to the Convention here, quite unanimously in his ward—made a great speech—created the most stir in the whole matter—was rapturously applauded. The fact is, there were many abolitionists in the body, and when men get together, however little they may desire to act themselves, they do relish strong talk. So Charles Sumner, writing to Judge Story: Feb. 5, 1845. The debates in the Convention were most interesting. I Life of Sumner, 2.331. never heard Garrison before. He spoke with natural eloquence. Hillard spoke exquisitely. His words descended in a golden G. S. Hillard. shower; but Garrison's fell in fiery rain. It seemed doubtful, at one time, if the abolitionists would not succeed in carrying the Convention. Their proposals were voted down; though a very respectable number of the Convention were in favor of a disso<
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 5
stimonies of our Revolutionary great men which they wished to quote (Wendell Phillips, speech before the Mass. A. S. Society, Jan. 27, 1853; Lib. 23: 26). See Chas. Sumner's Life, 2: 331. Edmund Quincy, writing the next day to Richard Webb, said of it: It was called by political gentlemen, mostly Whigs, not by Ms. Jan. 30,is, there were many abolitionists in the body, and when men get together, however little they may desire to act themselves, they do relish strong talk. So Charles Sumner, writing to Judge Story: Feb. 5, 1845. The debates in the Convention were most interesting. I Life of Sumner, 2.331. never heard Garrison before. He sSumner, 2.331. never heard Garrison before. He spoke with natural eloquence. Hillard spoke exquisitely. His words descended in a golden G. S. Hillard. shower; but Garrison's fell in fiery rain. It seemed doubtful, at one time, if the abolitionists would not succeed in carrying the Convention. Their proposals were voted down; though a very respectable number of the Conventi
l that power, the Committee could not as unanimously agree; but we are every hour more deeply convinced that there is but one mode and one alternative presented to the people of the free States, and that is, to have no religious, no political Union with slaveholders. On this ground we stand ready to unite again with Whigs, Democrats, and Liberty men; but on nothing short of this can we see any utility in attempting to make effectual resistance to the encroachments of Slavery. Senate and House at Washington had, on the last day of Lib. 15.18, 38, 39. February, 1845, agreed upon the joint resolution prescribing the terms of admission for Texas; Tyler sped the news Mar. 3, 1845; Lib. 17.162. with indecent haste, considering the nearness of his successor in office; the Mexican minister at the capital Lib. 15.43, 54. withdrew; the new President, Polk, made his disposition of forces by land and sea to deter Mexico from asserting in Lib. 15.197. arms her claims to the territory of T
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