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uncommonly brave and persevering bull, several young men in my neighborhood cried out repeatedly that he was fit to be the president of the Cortes, and of another, who shrunk from the contest after receiving only two blows from the picador, apparently the same persons kept shouting,. . . . that he was as cowardly as a king. . . . The bull-fights are, indeed, a warrant and apology for all sorts of licentiousness in language, in the same way the Roman shows were; and, like the amphitheatre of Flavius, that of Madrid would furnish a little anthology of popular wit, which, though it might strongly savor of vulgarity, could hardly fail to be very characteristic and amusing. . . . . After all, however, the people are not so bad as might reasonably be anticipated from all the means that seem to be studiously taken to corrupt them. The lower class especially is, I think, the finest materiel I have met in Europe to make a great and generous people; but this material is either unused or pe
De Laval Montmorency (search for this): chapter 10
for he has talent, a clear head, and considerable knowledge, though very little literature. His establishment was elegant, and he might easily have made it more so if he had chosen; but it was not necessary, for he was quite on a par with most of the ministers there. In short, I am clear there was not one of the diplomacy who understood his business better, or, taking the whole capital together, was more respected than Mr. Erving. The other person I refer to is the Prince and Duke de Laval Montmorency, of whom I have already spoken so often. He is one of the most distinguished noblemen in Europe, for he traces his ancestry ap to the remotest age of the French Monarchy, and there finds his progenitor to be the first nobleman in the country who received the Christian religion, and who thus gave to the family the title of Premier Baron Chretien, which they still wear in their arms. Since then there has hardly been one of its generations that has not been marked by some of the gre
Duke De Laval (search for this): chapter 10
of the kingdom. They have repeatedly been married into the royal family of the Bourbons, have acquired successively the title of Count of Buchoven, and Prince of Laval from the German Empire, Duke of Laval, and peer of the realm in France, and Duke of San Fernando-Luis and grandee of the first class in Spain, besides all sorts ofLaval, and peer of the realm in France, and Duke of San Fernando-Luis and grandee of the first class in Spain, besides all sorts of knighthoods, crosses, commanderships, etc., etc., and besides having been, more than once, at the head of affairs at home, and having often gained great battles abroad. I have never yet found anybody who was not ready to say that these honors are well placed on the prince that now wears them; for to more than common talents, and stic as a young man of twenty; and as Caesar de Balbo is the model of all that is bold, vehement, and obstinate, we used to have fine battles. Indeed the Duke do Laval, with whom I seldom failed to pass three or four hours, every day, in society somewhere, is one of the very few men I have met in Europe in whom I never saw anythi
William Hamilton (search for this): chapter 10
evening in the week at Madrid. Mad. de Tatistcheff had fitted up a neat theatre, and the party always began by a little French farce or comedy, which some of the diplomatists performed well, and which was amusing. She, however, never took a part in it, but reserved herself for an exhibition of more taste and effect afterwards; I mean the singularly striking and beautiful one of making natural pictures, for which her fine person admirably fitted her. This art was invented by the famous Lady Hamilton. When Goethe was in Italy, he was bewitched with it, and when he afterwards published his Wilhelm Meister, gave such glowing descriptions of the effect it is capable of producing, that all Germany took the passion for a while, and it has ever since been more successfully practised there than anywhere else. Mad. Schulze of Berlin, who represents in public, is now the most admired; but I never was where she exhibited, and those who have seen both, say Mad. de Tatistcheff is more beautifu
Don M. De Garay (search for this): chapter 10
amusement enough and no ceremony. . . . . Two persons I must not forget, for they were the two I knew the most intimately and familiarly. The first was my own minister, Mr. Erving, to whom I was introduced by Mr. Jefferson; and it was a matter of satisfaction to me to find my country represented by a man who was so much respected, both by the diplomacy, the government, and the Spaniards. As to the opinion of the diplomacy, I know it as well as I can know anything; and Mr. Pizarro and Mr. Garay made so little mystery of respecting Mr. Erving more than any other foreign minister at Madrid, that it gave a little umbrage to them all, as three of them have told me, and as I easily saw without being told. Moreover, the king's conduct to him personally at the levee, after he received the news of Jackson's taking Pensacola, and when, the Prince Laval had triumphantly told me the night before, and M. de Tatistcheff had told Caesar de Balbo, he would not venture to be seen at court, suff
Chev Pizarro (search for this): chapter 10
es. When I went into Spanish society, it was at the houses of the Marquis de St. Iago, the Marquis de Sta. Cruz, at Mr. Pizarro's, the Prime Minister, at the Duchess of Ossuna's, etc,, etc. I mention these because they are the best. That at the eared to lose it, et hoc genus omne, together with the gentlemen of the diplomacy and the foreigners they introduced. Mr. Pizarro seldom came, for he really had not time. He is—I write after his fall and exile—an honorable, honest man, with respecwas an Albanian; she also speaks Turkish tolerably. After her father's return,—for he was minister there,—she married Mr. Pizarro, and has been with him at several of the courts of Europe, and added elegance of manners to her other accomplishments, the government, and the Spaniards. As to the opinion of the diplomacy, I know it as well as I can know anything; and Mr. Pizarro and Mr. Garay made so little mystery of respecting Mr. Erving more than any other foreign minister at Madrid, that it
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 10
d-hearted, honorable gentlemen in the world,—and his family and legation are like himself,— and Saturday evening, therefore, was a pleasant one, because it was impossible to be in Prince Scilla's house, without feeling you were with kind, good people; and besides this, there was amusement enough and no ceremony. . . . . Two persons I must not forget, for they were the two I knew the most intimately and familiarly. The first was my own minister, Mr. Erving, to whom I was introduced by Mr. Jefferson; and it was a matter of satisfaction to me to find my country represented by a man who was so much respected, both by the diplomacy, the government, and the Spaniards. As to the opinion of the diplomacy, I know it as well as I can know anything; and Mr. Pizarro and Mr. Garay made so little mystery of respecting Mr. Erving more than any other foreign minister at Madrid, that it gave a little umbrage to them all, as three of them have told me, and as I easily saw without being told. More
William Vaughan (search for this): chapter 10
that interested me. The society on which I relied for rational conversation and agreeable intercourse was the foreign and diplomatic, which had its stated rendezvous and amusements, five evenings every week, and afforded a refuge on the others. On Sunday evening there was always a quiet, sober party at Sir Henry Wellesley's. He himself is a man of not more than common talents, but of sound judgment, and altogether a respectable English gentleman. The chief secretary of the legation, Mr. Vaughan, is a Fellow of Oxford, about five-and-thirty years old, who, though in the opposition, has made his way by talent and learning, and is soon to become a minister. For five years he had a travelling fellowship, and employed it in going through the interior of Asia, crossing down from Russia into Persia, and coming back by Palestine and Greece; altogether one of the most romantic expeditions I have ever heard of, and he himself altogether an interesting man. . . . . On Tuesday evening e
Dennis Jasper Murphy (search for this): chapter 10
, if he succeeded and escaped. The battle was gained, and in 1567 he began the convent, led to this spot by the circumstance that he had often hunted here, and perhaps by his gloomy disposition, which seemed always to delight in barrenness and desolation. . . . . The convent itself is worthy of the severest influences of the most monkish ages. It is the only establishment I have ever met that satisfied all the ideas I had formed, of the size of a monastery such as Mrs. Radcliffe or Dennis Jasper Murphy describes, and which is here so immense that, in the space occupied by its chief staircase alone, a large house might be built. . . . . For two days I enjoyed walking about continually with the monks, the prior, and the Bishop of Toledo, who happened to be there. The church of the convent would be reckoned among the large churches of Rome, and the beautiful ones of Italy. The instant I entered it, its light, disencumbered arches and dome, its broad, fine naves, and its massy, impo
ee with what familiarity they treat their masters; joining in the conversation at the Duchess of Ossuna's, for instance, while they wait at table, correcting the mistakes of their statements, etc., bun foreign countries have caught more or less of foreign culture and manners,—like the Duchess of Ossuna, the Marchioness de Mos, the Marquis de Sta. Cruz, the Prince of Anglona, etc.,—make a society cs de St. Iago, the Marquis de Sta. Cruz, at Mr. Pizarro's, the Prime Minister, at the Duchess of Ossuna's, etc,, etc. I mention these because they are the best. That at the Marquis de St. Iago was thrtulia at her house, because she went at ten o'clock every night to her mother's, the Duchess of Ossuna; but until that time she received all who came. The Spaniards, however, evidently did not like conversation. The house, however, to which I went most frequently, was that of the Duchess of Ossuna,—a woman extraordinary alike from her rank, her talents, and her wealth. I know not how many ti<
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