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D. M. Fairfax (search for this): chapter 6
secured by chains to the bow of the vessel. The wave-motion acting on this cumbrous mass was quite different from that of the monitor. It proved to be a battering ram, and loosened the armor plating on the bows of the Weehawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Keokuk, Commander A. C. Rhind. The vessels were ordered to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range of Fort Sumter they were to open upon it, and take position to the north and west, at a distance of eight hundred yards, firing low, and at the centre embrasure. The necessity for precision of fire was enjoined. Vessels were to be prepared to render assistance to each other as far as possib
John Rodgers (search for this): chapter 6
Sumter, and thence to the city of Charleston, but the weather became so hazy that the ranges could not be seen and the pilots refused to go farther. The state of the atmosphere prevented a satisfactory examination of an earthwork, known afterward as Fort Wagner, on Morris Island, distant about two thousand five hundred yards from Sumter, of the batteries on Cumming's Point, and of the heavy earthworks flanking Moultrie. The order of battle was line ahead as follows: The Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers, with a raft on the bows to explode torpedoes, It was formed of very heavy timbers crossing at right angles, bolted together, about fifty feet in length, shaped not unlike a boot-jack, the bows of the vessel propelling within the notch. The after-ends or jaws of the raft were secured by chains to the bow of the vessel. The wave-motion acting on this cumbrous mass was quite different from that of the monitor. It proved to be a battering ram, and loosened the armor plating on the
John Ericsson (search for this): chapter 6
e for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw over six and one-half feet of water, and be out of water amidships about fifteen inches. The contracts were made generally in the spring of 1863, and the vessels were to be furnished in the fall of that year. The Chimo, at Boston, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in the hands of Rear-Admiral Gregory, Chief-Engineer Wood, and Captain Ericsson (letter of Assistant Secretary of the Navy, December 15, 1864, to Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. 3, 1865).
Thomas Turner (search for this): chapter 6
complished, and before dark these two monitors anchored within. At high tide on the following morning, the Admiral came in on board of the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner, and was followed by the five monitors yet outside, and by the Keokuk. He intended to proceed the same day to the attack of Fort Sumter, and thence to thhawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the r. The wounded had been put on board of a tug a few minutes before the vessel sunk. The casualties were 16 seriously, and as many more slightly wounded. Commodore Turner, commanding the flag-ship, states that the pilot-house being insufficient to hold more persons than were required by the Admiral, he had taken personal char
Alban C. Stimers (search for this): chapter 6
nt if the cause of his country can be advanced by his removal. Chief-Engineer Alban C. Stimers was sent by the Department to look after and correct any deficienc blowing up some of the other monitors against which he might run by accident. Stimers, however, states that his explanation as to the safety of the vessels carrying batteries which may be reasonably expected. The official history of Chief-Engineer Stimers in relation to monitors closes as follows: Chief-Engineer Stimers is reChief-Engineer Stimers is responsible for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw oton, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inchee, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what
C. R. P. Rodgers (search for this): chapter 6
city and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engahe employment of two rafts that he had brought down, one of which was attached to the bow of the Weehawken. Each raft was designed to carry on its forward end a submerged torpedo to destroy by explosion any obstruction met with; the torpedo Captain Rodgers declined to carry, as he feared blowing up some of the other monitors against which he might run by accident. Stimers, however, states that his explanation as to the safety of the vessels carrying the torpedo was not satisfactory, and for th
S. W. Preston (search for this): chapter 6
untried vessels. These commanding officers had long been known to him; many of them had served in the squadron before, and were present at the capture of the Port Royal forts; they were men of the highest professional capacity and courage, and fully sustained their reputations, coming up to his requirements. He commended them and their reports, which speak of those under them, to the consideration of the Department. He then names in the highest terms Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant A. S. Mackenzie, and Ensign M. L. Johnson, who were on his staff or serving immediately under his personal observation. The result of the attack was mortifying to all of the officers and men engaged in it. Had any loss of life been regarded as likely to render another attempt successful, there would have been few indeed who would not have desired it. The opinion before the attack was general, and was fully shared in by the writer, that whatever might be the loss in me
D. Hunter (search for this): chapter 6
, and the President was with difficulty restrained from sending off Hunter and all the ironclads directly to New Orleans, the opening of the M to be imperative. On the night after the attack officers on General Hunter's staff were on board of the Ironsides with the proposition for the flag-officer to co-operate with General Hunter in the reduction of Morris Island, which, for reasons quite obvious, could not then be entned. In a reply to a very complimentary letter received from General Hunter at this time, the Admiral says: I feel very comfortable, Generat handed me would remove it. The following day, in a note to General Hunter, he says: I find the ships so much damaged during this short enssful, as we trust and believe you will be, it is expected that General Hunter will continue to keep the rebels employed and in constant appre other near points in your charge. Yours truly, A. Lincoln. General Hunter and Admiral Dupont. P. S.—Whoever receives this first, pl
tteries of the vessels on the 7th of April), would point rather to the probability of disaster than to success, had an attempt been made to enter. The reader has been informed of the strength of the attacking force in guns and in material resistance, and the failure of many of the guns to operate when they were most needed. A part of the defences at that time consisted of seventy-six guns of large calibre, which bore over the area occupied for a time by the vessels attacking. H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 69, Thirty-eighth Congress, First Session, page 85 (Report on Armored Vessels), states: There was a cylinder torpedo off Fort Wagner under charge of Mr. Langdon Cheves, who endeavored to explode it for ten minutes. He could not have placed the Ironsides more directly over the torpedo, but the confounded thing, as is usual with them, would not go off when it was wanted. The character of the defences of Charleston and the ability of the attacking force will appear more fully in the closi
A. C. Rhind (search for this): chapter 6
cumbrous mass was quite different from that of the monitor. It proved to be a battering ram, and loosened the armor plating on the bows of the Weehawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Keokuk, Commander A. C. Rhind. The vessels were ordered to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range of Fort Sumter they were to open upon it, and take position to the north and west, at a distance of eight hundred yards, firing low, and at the centre embrasure. The necessity for precision of fire was enjoined. Vessels were to be prepared to render assistance to each other as far as possible, and a special code of signals was arranged, that could be operated on b
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