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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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H. G. Trimble (search for this): chapter 1.30
r fell and these Confederate dead are buried and building a monument over their graves. Mr. H. G. Trimble, of Somerset, a Federal soldier, who was in the battle, kindly donated sufficient ground fr comrades. Thousands of Confederates will recognize and appreciate the generous gift of Captain Trimble and his wife to the trustees of the necessary ground on which to build a monument at this place. Captain Trimble came from a Virginia family who were revolutionary heroes, and who settled in Pulaski county after the close of the war. He himself enlisted in Company C, Third Kentucky Unitederal dead are buried at Logan's Cross-Roads, now called Mill Spring National Cemetery. Captain Trimble has given renewed evidence of the broad and liberal views of his family in donating this ground for a Conlederate monument and cemetery. It is the spirit of such men as H. G. Trimble that makes the American republic the greatest nation in the world. Within 300 feet of this oak lives Mr
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.30
Colonel C. S. A., (Major-General, United Confederate Veterans, Commanding Kentucky Division.) Early in January, 1862, Major-General George B. Crittenden, who was then in command of the Confederate forces in East Tennessee, advised General Albert Sidney Johnston that he was then on the north side of the Cumberland river, in Pulaski county, Kentucky; that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front; that it was impossible to cross the river, and that he was compelled to make th Wood. It had two guns, a part of McClung's Battery, and two small battalions of cavalry. The location on the north side of the Cumberland river, in Pulaski county, was made by General Felix K. Zollicoffer, without the approval of Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, then commanding the Department of Tennessee. At this late day it is difficult to understand why General Zollicoffer crossed the Cumberland river, leaving that uncertain stream—unfordable at this point—behind him, with nothing but a <
Dorothea Burton (search for this): chapter 1.30
he met death. Around him were other bodies clad in gray. He and his father helped to bury these strangers. Mr. Burton has a little girl 10 years old named Dorothea Burton. For two years past on Decoration Day this child has woven a wreath of wild flowers and hung it on Zollicoffer's oak and scattered blossoms over the trenchesument to these dead, who for more than forty years seem to have been lost to Confederate recognition. As we sat on a log under Zoilicoffer's tree by little Dorothea Burton, she asked me if I knew or loved any of those men who were killed and buried there. I replied that I did not know them, but they were my comrades, and I lovelways with hallowed memories amongst the survivors of the Confederate army of Tennessee and their descendants, and the tender, sweet, loving tribute of little Dorothea Burton, of Nancy Postoffice, Pulaski county, Ky., to the neglected Confederate heroes, should give her an abiding place in the hearts of all who loved the South and
ck the Federal forces then at Logan's Crossroads, nine miles south of Somerset. Neither the Confederates nor Federals at that time had much practical experience of war. Almost all of the Confederate troops were armed with flintlock muskets; some had ordinary percussion squirrel rifles and a few double-barrel shotguns. The Federal forces were commanded by General George H. Thomas. They consisted of about an equal number of men—4,000—and comprised the 10th Indiana, 1st Kentucky Cavalry (Wolford's), the 4th Kentucky Infantry, 2d Minnesota Infantry, 9th Ohio Infantry, 12th Kentucky Infantry, 1st Federal Tennessee, and 2d Federal Tennessee. There were a large number of Federal soldiers at Somerset, but the roads were muddy, and Fishing creek, near Somerset, had been greatly swollen by rain, and it was throught at that time by the Confederate commander to be impossible for the reserve forces which, were being hurried forward to support the other Federal troops already at Logan's cr
William L. Burton (search for this): chapter 1.30
al views of his family in donating this ground for a Conlederate monument and cemetery. It is the spirit of such men as H. G. Trimble that makes the American republic the greatest nation in the world. Within 300 feet of this oak lives Mr. William L. Burton, a Confederate sympathizer, who on the day of the conflict was 11 years of age, and came with his father to look at the sad, weird happenings of the struggle. He saw General Zollicoffer's body, with his head resting on a root of the oak tree under which he met death. Around him were other bodies clad in gray. He and his father helped to bury these strangers. Mr. Burton has a little girl 10 years old named Dorothea Burton. For two years past on Decoration Day this child has woven a wreath of wild flowers and hung it on Zollicoffer's oak and scattered blossoms over the trenches where sleep the Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama heroes who on that fateful Sunday morning in January, 1862, went down to death. This little girl
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.30
e the intrenchments at Beech Grove, almost on the banks of the Cumberland river, and march ten miles towards Somerset and attack the Federal forces then at Logan's Crossroads, nine miles south of Somerset. Neither the Confederates nor Federals at that time had much practical experience of war. Almost all of the Confederate troops were armed with flintlock muskets; some had ordinary percussion squirrel rifles and a few double-barrel shotguns. The Federal forces were commanded by General George H. Thomas. They consisted of about an equal number of men—4,000—and comprised the 10th Indiana, 1st Kentucky Cavalry (Wolford's), the 4th Kentucky Infantry, 2d Minnesota Infantry, 9th Ohio Infantry, 12th Kentucky Infantry, 1st Federal Tennessee, and 2d Federal Tennessee. There were a large number of Federal soldiers at Somerset, but the roads were muddy, and Fishing creek, near Somerset, had been greatly swollen by rain, and it was throught at that time by the Confederate commander to be
a great portion of which the slush was twelve inches deep. But all these difficulties did not quell the spirit of that superb patriotism and magnificent courage which dominated these Confederate soldiers. With patience, cheerfulness and fortitude they waded, marched and deployed through the long, dreary and exhausting night. In seven hours they made ten miles. The morning was dark, damp and gloomy. A mile in front of the Federal camp the Confederate cavalry advance came in contact with Woolford's cavalry pickets, and the conflict, to end so unfortunately for the Confederates, was on. The topographical conditions which met the Confederates were bad. On either side of the road were thick forests; the use of artillery was thus rendered impossible. Nobody seemed to know exactly where the Federal forces were, and through the gloom these Confederate soldiers searched for the enemy, and they were not long in finding them. The battle continued from about 7 o'clock until 10 Sunday mor
E. L. Sanders (search for this): chapter 1.30
ulse, with her brown, bare feet and sun-tinted hands, she searched the forest for its most brilliant-hued flowers and came and laid the beautiful offering on the tombs of these almost forgotten heroes. On the 21st of July, 1903, in company with Dr. and Mrs. E. L. Sanders, of Louisville, and Miss Ellanetta Harrison, of Somerset, I visited the battlefield to advise and help in the inclosure of a park and the erection of a suitable monument to these dead, who for more than forty years seem to Mrs. E. L. Sanders, of Louisville, and Miss Ellanetta Harrison, of Somerset, I visited the battlefield to advise and help in the inclosure of a park and the erection of a suitable monument to these dead, who for more than forty years seem to have been lost to Confederate recognition. As we sat on a log under Zoilicoffer's tree by little Dorothea Burton, she asked me if I knew or loved any of those men who were killed and buried there. I replied that I did not know them, but they were my comrades, and I loved them, and as I described how brave and noble they were, and how their homes were made desolate and their mothers and sisters mourned for them when they knew they would never come home any more, and how thousands of people wo
the 15th Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. Walthall; the 19th Tennessee, Colonel D. H. Cummings; the 20th Tennessee, Colonel Joel A. Battle; the 25th Tennessee, Colonel S. S. Stanton. To it was attached a battery of four guns and two companies of cavalry. The second brigade was commanded by General William H. Carroll, composed of the 17th Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller; the 28th Tennessee, Colonel John P. Murray; the 29th Tennessee, Colonel Samuel Powell; the 16th Alabama, Colonel W. B. Wood. It had two guns, a part of McClung's Battery, and two small battalions of cavalry. The location on the north side of the Cumberland river, in Pulaski county, was made by General Felix K. Zollicoffer, without the approval of Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, then commanding the Department of Tennessee. At this late day it is difficult to understand why General Zollicoffer crossed the Cumberland river, leaving that uncertain stream—unfordable at this point—behind him, with nothing bu
United Confederate Veterans (search for this): chapter 1.30
Zollicoffer's oak. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August, 1903.] Recollections of the battle of Mill Springs and the death of this gallant soldier-efforts to protect his grave. by Bennett H. Young, Colonel C. S. A., (Major-General, United Confederate Veterans, Commanding Kentucky Division.) Early in January, 1862, Major-General George B. Crittenden, who was then in command of the Confederate forces in East Tennessee, advised General Albert Sidney Johnston that he was then on the north side of the Cumberland river, in Pulaski county, Kentucky; that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front; that it was impossible to cross the river, and that he was compelled to make the fight on the ground he then occupied. He had under his orders about 4,000 men, consisting of two brigades, the first commanded by General Felix K. Zollicoffer. This brigade was composed of the 15th Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. Walthall; the 19th Tennessee, Colonel D. H. Cum
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