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Guy C. Hawkins (search for this): chapter 11
ds at the Gardner districts. Miss Jeffurds is allowed to keep some private scholars not exceeding six, and to receive compensation there from. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to attend to the schools outside the Neck, the same as last year. They engage for the winter term Miles Gardner, for the Gardner school; Elliot Valy in November, at $32 per month; and H. K. Curtis for the Russell district, four months, at $30. The care of the outside schools was assigned to Messrs. Adams and Hawkins for the trustees. At a special meeting held June 20, 1833, it was voted that teachers of the public schools be requested to parade their scholars on the day of ty—June 24. The petition of John Tufts and others praying for a removal of the schoolhouse in Milk Row was referred to Messrs. Willard, Frothingham, and (later) Hawkins. This seems to be the first move on record looking to the establishment of the Prospect Hill school on Medford street. Voted that teachers receive no scholar int
Clara Whittemore (search for this): chapter 11
age attendance was seventeen out of a total of nineteen. The teacher had classes in geometry, algebra, and natural philosophy, nor were the common branches neglected. Also, there was instruction in the rudiments of music. The winter term was under William R. Bagnall, with an average of twenty out of twenty-four. The Russell district verges upon the town of West Cambridge, the schoolhouse being about one-half mile from that meeting house. During the summer this school was under Miss Clara Whittemore. Whole number, twenty-four; average attendance, eighteen, mostly small children. She had brought the school from a state of confusion to one of discipline. During the winter Phila Russell had charge. Whole number, thirty-seven; average, thirty. His efforts and skill are worthy of the highest commendation. He insisted upon the thoroughness of all his pupils. His uniform practice is, if a pupil makes a blunder in recitation, he is compelled afterwards to repeat that part of his
Ann E. Newell (search for this): chapter 11
auditors of all bills that came before the trustees were Richard Frothingham, Jr., and Charles Forster. Special appropriation to repair Russell district schoolhouse$200.00 Salaries: Joshua Bates (Winthrop school)900.00 and for teaching ancient languages.100.00 Samuel Swan800.00 Mary B. Symmes200.00 Sarah G. Hay200.00 Harvard school:— N. Merrill45.00 Paul H. Sweetser855.00 Charles Kimball800.00 Mary E. Jones$200.00 M. S. Fernald200.00 Bunker Hill— William D. Swan724.25 Robert Swan175.00 B. F. Tweed157.50 Charlotte Cutter200.00 Primary teachers, each $210, fourteen Schools2,940.00 Winter Hill:— Ann E. Newell20.00 Ellen A. Damon45.00 James Hove280.00 Prospect Hill:— Miss E. P. Whittredge120.00 Amos S. Allen210.00 Milk Row:— Miss S. M. Burnham120.00 Joel Pierce192.50 Russell district:— Clara D. Whittemore96.00 P. R. Russell, Jr120.00 Gardner district:— M. W. J. Evans96.00 William R. Bagnall120.00 (To
Charlotte A. Sawyer (search for this): chapter 11
primary schools, some repairs and alterations will be necessary. Primary schools within the peninsula:— No. 1, the school at the Neck, is kept in a building hired of T. J. Elliot: It has been under the charge of Miss Malvina B. Skilton over three years. No. 2, at Eden street, in a room hired of J. K. Frothingham, is under Miss Mary Walker, who has been longer in this employment than any other of our teachers. No. 3, in the vestry of the Methodist meeting house, is kept by Miss Charlotte A. Sawyer. No. 4, in School street, kept by Miss Susan L. Sawyer, before the end of the year (1838) had an offshoot taken from it, which was put under Miss Esther M. Hay. An examination of both was held in Boylston chapel. No. 5. This school is kept by Miss E. H. Dodge, in the vestry of the Universalist meeting house on Warren street. (The rental of the room was $50 per year.) No. 6 is held in a small rear room off Lawrence street, and is under Miss Betsey Putnam. No. 7 is kept
Amos S. Allen (search for this): chapter 11
erage of fifty out of sixty-one pupils. This lady received the decided approbation of the board. She was efficient and faithful. She divided the school into six classes, thus the youngest had more attention than usually falls to their lot. Amos S. Allen was the winter teacher, and had an average of forty-five out of a total of sixty enrolled,—a degree of irregularity wholly inconsistent with the interests of the district. A great improvement in penmanship was noticed. The teacher, though s5 Robert Swan175.00 B. F. Tweed157.50 Charlotte Cutter200.00 Primary teachers, each $210, fourteen Schools2,940.00 Winter Hill:— Ann E. Newell20.00 Ellen A. Damon45.00 James Hove280.00 Prospect Hill:— Miss E. P. Whittredge120.00 Amos S. Allen210.00 Milk Row:— Miss S. M. Burnham120.00 Joel Pierce192.50 Russell district:— Clara D. Whittemore96.00 P. R. Russell, Jr120.00 Gardner district:— M. W. J. Evans96.00 William R. Bagnall120.00 (To be
O. C. Felton (search for this): chapter 11
Willard, Frothingham, and (later) Hawkins. This seems to be the first move on record looking to the establishment of the Prospect Hill school on Medford street. Voted that teachers receive no scholar into school after twenty minutes past the hour for commencing school. The only reference to teachers within the peninsula this year was November 8, 1833, when James Swan was elected writing master at the Training Field school, Reuben Swan, Jr., writing master in the Town Hill school, and O. C. Felton as master of the school at the Neck. As the last-named did not accept, William D. Swan was put in charge of this school. All three teachers received a salary of $650, which was raised to $700 later on. About the time which we are considering, the school for girls, which had been at the Training Field, was transferred to the Town Hill side, and the boys' school at the latter place now occupied the newer and more commodious building at the Training Field. I find no mention of this change
Mary E. Jones (search for this): chapter 11
be succeeded by Benjamin F. Tweed. The assistant is Miss Charlotte Cutter. The Harvard school, on Town Hill, is for girls. The teachers here are Paul Sweetser and Charles Kimball. (His term of service began before May, 1837.) Assistants: Miss M. E. Jones, Miss C. A. Johnson, Miss Fernald. The Winthrop school at the Training Field is for boys, the teachers being Mr. Bates and Samuel Swan, and for assistants, Miss Symmes and Miss Hay. Expenses appended to the trustees' report of May, 1839: Salaries: Joshua Bates (Winthrop school)900.00 and for teaching ancient languages.100.00 Samuel Swan800.00 Mary B. Symmes200.00 Sarah G. Hay200.00 Harvard school:— N. Merrill45.00 Paul H. Sweetser855.00 Charles Kimball800.00 Mary E. Jones$200.00 M. S. Fernald200.00 Bunker Hill— William D. Swan724.25 Robert Swan175.00 B. F. Tweed157.50 Charlotte Cutter200.00 Primary teachers, each $210, fourteen Schools2,940.00 Winter Hill:— Ann E. Newell20.00 Ellen A. Damo
Ann P. Whipple (search for this): chapter 11
ceive a proper share of attention. (Charlotte Cutter was one of these assistants. Her services at the Neck school began April 17, 1837.) In conclusion, the report says that evidently another school must be established and a building erected. Such improvements can be made for $2,600, and it is so recommended. (Signed) Charles Thompson, president; Thomas Brown, Jr., secretary. 1837-1838. The summer schools beyond the Neck, for this season, were under the following instructors: Miss Ann P. Whipple, of the Prospect Hill school; Rachel T. Stevens, of the Milk Row school; Miss Marv B. Gardner, of the Russell school;, Miss Irene S. Locke of the Gardner school; and Miss Sarah M. Burnham, of the Winter Hill school. Teachers in these schools were informed, through Mr. Underwood, that they were to teach on Wednesday afternoons as heretofore. It seems that a petition had been circulated in favor of the half-holiday, but the parents objected to it. The compensation for keeping fires
Kezia Russell (search for this): chapter 11
1833-1834. It was voted early this season to retain the services of Mr. Sherman at No. 5, at the salary of $360, and to pay the teacher at the Neck $600. Miss Kezia Russell was appointed to teach the summer term in the Russell district, and Miss Abby Mead at Winter Hill. For the winter term the appointments were: Aaron B. Mago—– $5,400 1835-1836. The teachers for the summer schools beyond the peninsula were Miss Ann E. Whipple for Milk Row, Miss Abby Mead for Winter Hill, Miss Kezia Russell for the Russell, and Miss Anna B. Mead for the Gardner. These schools were assigned to the charge of Messrs. Hazeltine and Allen for the trustees. Among b sixty-seven on an average for each teacher. The Male school had 228, the Female 211, and the Neck schools, both male and female, 129. At Winter Hill, Milk Row, Russell, and Gardner schools the number of pupils was 80, 116, 29, and 30, respectively, making a total of 1,625. During the year Nathan Merrill, of the Town Hill sch
Isaac Kendall (search for this): chapter 11
ss Martha T. McKoun for the Russell school; and Miss Sarah M. Crowninshield for the Gardner school. It was voted in May to make repairs at Milk Row school. These were all the more needed, for, June 30, we read: It having been represented by Mr. C. Thompson that the windows in the schoolhouse there have been very badly broken, it was voted that the committee in charge get evidence and act as they think proper. Bills for work at the Milk Row schoolhouse were approved, among them being Isaac Kendall's for $12.44, and John W. Mulliken's for $97.41. Miss Locke, following as she did a popular teacher like Mr. Sherman, seems to, have had a hard school to manage. A petition signed by Alfred Allen and others was circulated for her removal, but the trustees voted to sustain the teacher. They feel bound to say that their confidence in the talents, deportment, and qualifications of Miss Locke remain undiminished. They recommend that she continue in the school and be encouraged in the a
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