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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909. Search the whole document.

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Peru (Peru) (search for this): chapter 1
899. Conner, Thomas, discharged March 12, 1863; died some fifteen years ago. Crosby, Elkanah, enlisted in Company I, Fifth Regiment, May 1 to July 31, 1861; went out with Company E as corporal; promoted to sergeant; one of the few to remain with the company during its whole period of service; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives at 110 Hudson Street, Somerville. Crowley, Daniel, musician (drummer); was with the company during its whole term of service; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives in Peru, Ill. Cutter, George, deserted June 3, 1863; afterwards seen in a New York Cavalry Regiment. Davis, Amos F., detached for special service; came back to the Company May 26, 1865; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives in Dorchester. Dodge, Albert H., deserted December, 1864; has died since the War; came from Nova Scotia. Dodge, William H., brother of Albert H., discharged for disability May 18, 1865; died twelve years ago. Dusseault, John H., went out as first sergeant; promoted to s
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eached Black's and White's Station in the forenoon. Camp was laid out and a halt made here. During the following days many of the officers and men of the Regiment, who had been in the hands of the enemy since August, returned from the paroled camp. Major F. R. Kinsley was of this number, and the command of the Regiment now devolved upon him. May 1. We broke camp once more and began the march to Washington; passed through Petersburg May 3; through Richmond May 6; over the memorable Fredericksburg battleground May 9; crossed the Rappahannock for the tenth and last time; and halted Friday, May 12, at Arlington, near Fort Albany, and very near the first camp ground of the Regiment in Virginia. May 23. The Regiment took part in the grand review of the army in Washington, returning to camp in the afternoon. June 2. The mustering out of the Regiment began, and Sunday, June 4, we broke camp and reported in Washington for transportation to Massachusetts. The journey home was mad
Nottoway river (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e rear line, where the Fifth Corps was being massed, and went into camp. December 7. The Corps started on a march on Jerusalem Plank Road, the Thirty-ninth taking the advance of the Infantry. After marching south some eighteen miles, the Nottoway River was crossed at 5 P. M., and after four more miles they halted for the night near Sussex Court House. December 8. The next morning the march was resumed, when they passed through the place last mentioned and Coman's Well. Just before reaInfantry. The enemy's cavalry followed closely all day, and captured many stragglers. Four of the Thirty-ninth Regiment were thus taken. The halt for the night was near Sussex Court House. December 11. The march began at daylight. The Nottoway River was crossed at 4 P. M., and at 9 P. M. there was a halt for the night. On the next day, after a rapid march of twelve miles, the lines before Petersburg were reached, where we went into camp near Jerusalem Plank Road. December 16. Here w
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nd the troops were encouraged by evidences of hasty flight all along the route. Sunday, April 9, found us at Appomattox Court House, in the immediate presence of the enemy. But soon after our arrival upon the field all hostilities suddenly ceased, and later in the day the entire army opposed to us surrendered. We remained here while the paroling of the enemy went on, until Saturday, April 15, when we broke camp and began the return march to Petersburg. Sunday, April 16. We reached Farmville in the afternoon, where we received the sad news of President Lincoln's assassination. A gloom rested on the camp that night which will never be forgotten. Friday, April 21. We reached Black's and White's Station in the forenoon. Camp was laid out and a halt made here. During the following days many of the officers and men of the Regiment, who had been in the hands of the enemy since August, returned from the paroled camp. Major F. R. Kinsley was of this number, and the command of
Canton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ered out June 2, 1865; lives at 121 Cross Street, Somerville. Shaw, John B., brother of the above; detailed to special service (hospital duty), August 5, 1863 to May, 1865; mustered out June 2, 1865; address, 121 Cross Street, Somerville. Skehan, John, discharged February 9, 1863; probably not living. Smith, Addison, discharged July 1, 1863; died in Somerville June 25, 1895. Stevens, Leslie, had seen service earlier; went out as corporal; discharged January 25, 1863; lives at Canton, Mass. Stickney, Hiram C., discharged April 22, 1863; probably not living. Thomas, William H., on special duty as guard for quartermaster's stores, January 12, 1864, to May 27, 1865; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives at 12 Essex Street, Somerville. Thompson, Frank W., taken prisoner August 19, 1864; perhaps he died January 10, 1865. Van de Sande, George, went out as corporal; promoted to sergeant; discharged August 22, 1863, to accept commission as second lieutenant in a regiment of
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
It then left the rear, and took a position (still on the railroad) one-half mile in front of Duchesne, and one mile from the Globe Tavern. October 26. The Regiment moved to the left and garrisoned Fort Conahey. The whole army made a reconnoisance in force to Hatcher's Run. October 31. Having returned from the Run, the Regiment resumed its position in line near Fort Wadsworth. November 5. Lieutenant-Colonel Tremlett (major of the Thirty-ninth) returned from draft-rendezvous, Boston Harbor, and took command of the Regiment, relieving Nelson. December 1. The state colors, borne by the Regiment since leaving home, were returned to the adjutant-general because they were too worn for use. December 5. The Regiment moved to the rear line, where the Fifth Corps was being massed, and went into camp. December 7. The Corps started on a march on Jerusalem Plank Road, the Thirty-ninth taking the advance of the Infantry. After marching south some eighteen miles, the Nottow
Bellfield (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eft to guard the road, while the main column passed on. A little after dark the line was abandoned, and the Regiment followed the column, overtaking the Corps on the Weldon Railroad, near Jerrett's Station. The night was spent in destroying the road, burning railroad ties, etc. December 9. A position was taken at the extreme left of the Corps, and the Regiment picketed the front of the Brigade, which was engaged in tearing up the road. At 6 P. M. it was withdrawn to Cross Roads above Bellfield, and one-half the Regiment was sent on picket and one-half to bivouac with the Brigade. December 10. In the morning the troops began to return, and the Thirty-ninth was designated to cover the rear. In the afternoon the enemy made a dash on our rear and drove in our rear guard of cavalry. But they were checked by the shots of our Infantry. The enemy's cavalry followed closely all day, and captured many stragglers. Four of the Thirty-ninth Regiment were thus taken. The halt for the
Fort Albany (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
ficers and men of the Regiment, who had been in the hands of the enemy since August, returned from the paroled camp. Major F. R. Kinsley was of this number, and the command of the Regiment now devolved upon him. May 1. We broke camp once more and began the march to Washington; passed through Petersburg May 3; through Richmond May 6; over the memorable Fredericksburg battleground May 9; crossed the Rappahannock for the tenth and last time; and halted Friday, May 12, at Arlington, near Fort Albany, and very near the first camp ground of the Regiment in Virginia. May 23. The Regiment took part in the grand review of the army in Washington, returning to camp in the afternoon. June 2. The mustering out of the Regiment began, and Sunday, June 4, we broke camp and reported in Washington for transportation to Massachusetts. The journey home was made quickly, with but few halts: one at the well-known Cooper Shop, which never allowed a soldier to pass through Philadelphia hungry;
Joseph W. Whitmore (search for this): chapter 1
pril 22, 1863; probably not living. Thomas, William H., on special duty as guard for quartermaster's stores, January 12, 1864, to May 27, 1865; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives at 12 Essex Street, Somerville. Thompson, Frank W., taken prisoner August 19, 1864; perhaps he died January 10, 1865. Van de Sande, George, went out as corporal; promoted to sergeant; discharged August 22, 1863, to accept commission as second lieutenant in a regiment of colored troops; died since the war. Whitmore, Joseph W., taken prisoner October 11, 1863; died at Andersonville, Ga., July 1, 1864. Willcutt, William C., deserted in Washington September 9, 1862; arrested and sent to Fort Independence; discharged for disability; probably not living. The Company originally was composed of three officers and ninety-eight enlisted men. William Moulton and William F. Boynton, who joined later, came from Somerville, and are included in this record, and make the number accounted for 103. In June, 186
Amos F. Davis (search for this): chapter 1
ervice, Ordnance department; mustered out June 2, 1865; died in Mexico April 23, 1885. Boynton, William F., came as a recruit March 29, 1864; wounded August 18, 1864; mustered out January 12, 1865; died in Somerville in August, 1892. Bucknam, Davis P., enlisted as corporal; discharged for disability June 18, 1863; lives at 12 Vine Street, Somerville. Byrnes, John, transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps February 15, 1864; lives at 202 Summer Street, Somerville. Canfield, John B., takomerville. Crowley, Daniel, musician (drummer); was with the company during its whole term of service; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives in Peru, Ill. Cutter, George, deserted June 3, 1863; afterwards seen in a New York Cavalry Regiment. Davis, Amos F., detached for special service; came back to the Company May 26, 1865; mustered out June 2, 1865; lives in Dorchester. Dodge, Albert H., deserted December, 1864; has died since the War; came from Nova Scotia. Dodge, William H., brot
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