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rchbishop of Canterbury display a little more of the resolution of a Laud or a Sextus Quintus; for what, said they, has the church ever gained by that which the courtesy of England calls prudence? Thomas B. Chandler, 12 Nov. 1765. Yet when Moore, the new governor, arrived, he could do nothing but give way to the popular impulse. He dismantled the fort, and suspended his power to execute the Stamp Act. Sir H. Moore to Conway, 21 Nov. When the assembly came together, it confirmed the dSir H. Moore to Conway, 21 Nov. When the assembly came together, it confirmed the doings of its committee at the Congress, and prepared papers analogous to them. In New Jersey, Ogden found himself disavowed by his constituents. The assembly, by a unanimous vote, accepted his resignation as speaker, and thanked the two faithful delegates who had signed the proceedings of the Congress. Of those proceedings, New Hampshire, by its assembly, signified its entire approbation. The voluntary Letter from Gadsden, 16 Dec. action of the representatives of Georgia was esteemed a
crowd, they expressed their adherence by shouts. Your best way, added Sears to the friends of order, will be to advise Lieutenant-Governor Colden to send the stamp papers from the fort to the inhabitants. To appease their wrath, Colden invited Kennedy to receive them on board the Coventry. They are already lodged in the fort, answered Kennedy, unwilling to offend the people. The Common Council of New-York next interposed. Minutes of the Common Council of N. Y. 5 Nov. Colden to Gage, 5 NovKennedy, unwilling to offend the people. The Common Council of New-York next interposed. Minutes of the Common Council of N. Y. 5 Nov. Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. They asked that the stamped paper should be delivered into the care of the corporation, to be deposited in the City Hall, offering in that case to chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. prevent further confusion. The Common Council were a body elected by the people; they were the representatives of the people over against the king's Governor and Council, and the military Viceroy. Colden pleaded his oath, to do his utmost, that every clause of the Act should be observed; he pleaded further the still great
William Livingston (search for this): chapter 19
, he wrote to Conway, at a time when the government in England was still bent on enforcing the Stamp Act, R. Jackson to Bernard, 8 Nov. 1765. the lawyers of this place are the authors and conductors of the present sedition. If judges be sent from England, with an able Attorney- chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. General and Solicitor-General, to make examples of some very few, this colony will remain quiet. Others of his letters pointed plainly to John Morin Scott, Robert R. Livingston, and William Livingston, as suitable victims. At the same time, some of the churchmen avowed to one another their longing to see the Archbishop of Canterbury display a little more of the resolution of a Laud or a Sextus Quintus; for what, said they, has the church ever gained by that which the courtesy of England calls prudence? Thomas B. Chandler, 12 Nov. 1765. Yet when Moore, the new governor, arrived, he could do nothing but give way to the popular impulse. He dismantled the fort, and suspended hi
all former orders; and chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. not even to receive goods on commission, unless the Stamp Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was introduced by the tolling of muffled bells; minute-guns were fired, and penna
William Smith (search for this): chapter 19
ring in that case to chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. prevent further confusion. The Common Council were a body elected by the people; they were the representatives of the people over against the king's Governor and Council, and the military Viceroy. Colden pleaded his oath, to do his utmost, that every clause of the Act should be observed; he pleaded further the still greater contempt Colden to Maj. James, 6 Nov. into which the government would fall by concession. But the Council, in which William Smith, the historian of New-York, acted a prudent part, Diary of John Adams. as the negotiator between the Lieutenant-Governor, the General, and the people, answered that his power was unequal to the protection of the inhabitants; Minutes of Council. Gage, being appealed to, Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. Gage to Colden, 5 Nov. Gage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, that a fire from the fort would be the signal for an insurrection, and the commencement of a civil w
James Otis (search for this): chapter 19
In addition to this state paper, which was the imprint; of the mind of Samuel Adams, Not of Otis. The paper has not the style of Otis, and does not express his opinions. Besides; he was absentOtis, and does not express his opinions. Besides; he was absent from Boston from the delivery of Bernard's speech till after the reply was made, performing his duty at New-York, as a member of Congress. The paper has the style of S. Adams, and expresses his sentt the time the applause which it won, said also, that of all the politicians of Boston, including Otis and Cushing, Samuel Adams had the most thorough understanding of liberty and her resources in thece of the people of Boston beyond what was given to any of his colleagues; and the vacillation of Otis, increasing with his infirmities, ceased to be of public importance. Massachusetts never again d affection, with apprehension and firmness of resolve. Pray for the peace of our Jerusalem, said Otis, from his heart, fearing the parliament would charge the colonies with presenting petitions in on
constituents. The assembly, by a unanimous vote, accepted his resignation as speaker, and thanked the two faithful delegates who had signed the proceedings of the Congress. Of those proceedings, New Hampshire, by its assembly, signified its entire approbation. The voluntary Letter from Gadsden, 16 Dec. action of the representatives of Georgia was esteemed a valid adhesion to the design of the Congress on the part of the colony. Its governor was met by the same rebellious spirit Sir J. Wright to Lords of Trade, 9 Nov. 1765. as prevailed at the North. The delegates of South Carolina were received by their assembly on the twenty-sixth of November. On chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. that morning all the papers of the Congress, the declaration of rights, and the addresses were read; in an evening session, they were all adopted without change, by a vote which wanted but one of being unanimous; they were signed by the speaker, and put on board the Charming Charlotte, a fine ship ridin
paper should be delivered into the care of the corporation, to be deposited in the City Hall, offering in that case to chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. prevent further confusion. The Common Council were a body elected by the people; they were the representatives of the people over against the king's Governor and Council, and the military Viceroy. Colden pleaded his oath, to do his utmost, that every clause of the Act should be observed; he pleaded further the still greater contempt Colden to Maj. James, 6 Nov. into which the government would fall by concession. But the Council, in which William Smith, the historian of New-York, acted a prudent part, Diary of John Adams. as the negotiator between the Lieutenant-Governor, the General, and the people, answered that his power was unequal to the protection of the inhabitants; Minutes of Council. Gage, being appealed to, Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. Gage to Colden, 5 Nov. Gage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, t
termand all former orders; and chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. not even to receive goods on commission, unless the Stamp Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was introduced by the tolling of muffled bells; minute-guns were fired, and
Eliphalet Dyer (search for this): chapter 19
t. royal governors took the oath to carry the Stamp Act punctually into effect. In Connecticut, which, in chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. its assembly, had already voted American taxation by a British parliament to be unprecedented and unconstitutional, Dyer, of the council, entreated Fitch not to take an oath which was contrary to that of the governor, to maintain the rights of the colony. But Fitch had urged the assembly to prosecute for riot the five hundred that coerced Ingersoll at Wethersfield;t the Act must go down; that forty regulars could guard the stamp papers; and that the American conduct would bring from home violent measures and the loss of charters; and he resolved to comply; E. Stiles' Diary. on which Pitkin, Trumbull, and Dyer, truly representing the sentiments of Connecticut, rose with indignation and left the room. The governor of Rhode Island stood alone in his patriotic refusal. But every where, either quietly of themselves, or at the instance of the people, ami
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