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Artemas Ward (search for this): chapter 12
weight of the colonies. But he admitted that such a rule could not then be settled. In the same spirit spoke the elder Rutledge. We have, said he, no legal authority; and obedience to the measures we adopt will only follow their reasonableness, apparent utility, and necessity. We have no coercive authority. Our constituents are bound only Chap. XI.} 1774 Sept. in honor to observe our determinations. I cannot see any way of voting but by colonies, said Gadsden. Every colony, insisted Ward, of Rhode Island, should have an equal vote. The counties of Virginia are unequal in point of wealth and numbers, yet each has a right to send two members to its legislature. We come, if necessary, to make a sacrifice of our all, and by such a sacrifice the weakest will suffer as much as the greatest. Harrison, of Virginia, spoke strongly on the opposite side, and was very apprehensive, that if such a disrespect should be put upon his countrymen, as that Virginia should have no greater wei
Samuel Adams (search for this): chapter 12
y a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, representingith prayer, Jay and Rutledge objected, on account of the great diversity of religious sentiments. I am no bigot, said Samuel Adams, the Congregationalist; I can hear a prayer from a man of piety and virtue, who is at the same time a friend to his coand Jay, and Rutledge, and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingstons, Sherman, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and others of Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. New England, who believed that a rude soldiery were then infesting hat body there was a man who knew how to bring the enthusiasm of the people into connection with its representatives. Samuel Adams, wrote Galloway, though by no means remarkable for brilliant abilities, is equal to most men in popular intrigue, and
Israel Putnam (search for this): chapter 12
public. The treacherous Galloway pledged his honor with the rest. To the proposal that congress the next day. should be opened with prayer, Jay and Rutledge objected, on account of the great diversity of religious sentiments. I am no bigot, said Samuel Adams, the Congregationalist; I can hear a prayer from a man of piety and virtue, who is at the same time a friend to his country; and on his nomination, Duche, an Episcopal clergyman, was chosen for the service. Before the adjournment, Putnam's express arrived with the report of a bloody attack on the people by the troops at Boston; of Connecticut as well as Massachusetts rising in arms. The next day muffled bells were tolled. At the opening of congress, Washington was present, standing in prayer, and Henry, and Randolph, and Lee, and Jay, and Rutledge, and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingstons, Sherman, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and others of Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. New England, who
ere then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, represenas unanimously chosen. The body then named itself the congress, and its chairman the president. Jay and Duane would have selected a secretary from among the members themselves, but they found no suentire new government must be founded. I cannot yet think that all government is at an end, said Jay in reply, or that we came to frame an American constitution, instead of endeavoring to correct thhonor with the rest. To the proposal that congress the next day. should be opened with prayer, Jay and Rutledge objected, on account of the great diversity of religious sentiments. I am no bigot,ng of congress, Washington was present, standing in prayer, and Henry, and Randolph, and Lee, and Jay, and Rutledge, and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingsto
Richard Henry Lee (search for this): chapter 12
all; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, representing eleven colonies, answere the Ancient Dominion; and he was at once rebuked by his colleagues. Though a representation equal to the importance of each colony, were ever so just, said Richard Henry Lee, the delegates from the several colonies are unprepared with materials to settle that equality. Bland, of Virginia, saw no safety but in voting by colonies.setts rising in arms. The next day muffled bells were tolled. At the opening of congress, Washington was present, standing in prayer, and Henry, and Randolph, and Lee, and Jay, and Rutledge, and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingstons, Sherman, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and others of Cha
hode Island, and others, representing eleven colonies, answered to the call. Peyton Randolph, late speaker of the assembly of Virginia, was nominated president by Lynch of Carolina, and was unanimously chosen. The body then named itself the congress, and its chairman the president. Jay and Duane would have selected a secretary from among the members themselves, but they found no support; and on the motion of Lynch, Charles Thomson was appointed without further opposition. The measures that were to have divided America bound them closely together. Colonies differing in religious opinions and in commercial interests, in every thing dependent on climate an between Virginians, Pennsylvanians, New Yorkers, and New Englanders are no more. I am not a Virginian, but an American. A compound of numbers and property, said Lynch, of South Carolina, should determine the weight of the colonies. But he admitted that such a rule could not then be settled. In the same spirit spoke the elder R
Roger Sherman (search for this): chapter 12
y muffled bells were tolled. At the opening of congress, Washington was present, standing in prayer, and Henry, and Randolph, and Lee, and Jay, and Rutledge, and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingstons, Sherman, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and others of Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. New England, who believed that a rude soldiery were then infesting the dwellings and taking the lives of their friends. When the psalm for the day was read, Heaven itself seemed ud. John Rutledge, on the contrary, held that allegiance is inalienable; that the first emigrants had not had the right to elect their king; that American claims were derived from the British constitution rather than from the law of nature. But Sherman of Connecticut deduced allegiance from consent, without which the colonies were not bound by the act of settlement. Duane, like Rutledge, shrunk back from the appeal to the law of nature, and founded the power of government on property in land.
ts had not had the right to elect their king; that American claims were derived from the British constitution rather than from the law of nature. But Sherman of Connecticut deduced allegiance from consent, without which the colonies were not bound by the act of settlement. Duane, like Rutledge, shrunk back from the appeal to the law of nature, and founded the power of government on property in land. Behind all these views lay the question of the power of parliament over the colonies. Dickinson, not yet a member of congress, was fully of opinion that no officer under the new establishment in Massachusetts ought to be acknowledged, but advocated allowing to parliament the regulation of trade upon principles of necessity, and the mutual interest of both countries. A right of regulating trade, said Gadsden, true to the principle of 1765, is a right of legislation, and a right of legislation in one case is a right in all; and he denied the claim with peremptory energy. Amidst suc
September 5th (search for this): chapter 12
liament. Yet there was great diversity of opinions respecting the proper modes of resisting the aggressions of the mother country, and conciliation was the ardent wish of all. The South Carolinians greeted the delegates of Massachusetts as the envoys of freedom herself; and the Virginians equalled or surpassed their colleagues in resoluteness and spirit; but all united in desiring to promote the union of Great Britain and the colonies on a constitutional foundation. On Monday the fifth day of September, the mem- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. bers of congress, meeting at Smith's tavern, moved in a body to select the place for their deliberations. Galloway, the speaker of Pennsylvania, would have had them use the State House, but the carpenters of Philadelphia offered their plain but spacious hall; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Ad
ers elected to the continental con- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. gress, Galloway of Philadelphia was so the fifth day of September, the mem- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. bers of congress, meeting at Smith's tavany as it pleased. Henry, a repre- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. sentative of the largest state, intimatenhabitants in all the thirteen colonies was, in 1774, about two millions one hundred thousand; of bls dissolved; that they were reduced Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. to a state of nature; that the congress y. Our constituents are bound only Chap. XI.} 1774 Sept. in honor to observe our determinations. t then able to procure proper mate- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. rials for ascertaining the importance ofel Adams, John Adams, and others of Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. New England, who believed that a rude soance, for the king's right to grant Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. them has itself been denied. Besides, tament must soon be chosen, they ex- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. pressed their trust that the united effo[1 more...]
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