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Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 16
ny killed and wounded on both sides. The Federals, overpowered by numbers, had, at latest accounts, fallen back a distance of eight miles, leaving a quantity of baggage in the hands of the enemy, and were still retreating towards Pilot Knob. At Pilot Knob considerable alarm existed, and Col. Carlin was making every preparation for the impending struggle at that point. An attack was thought to be inevitable last night, but will not probably take place until to- day. The Wisconsin regiment which left here on Wednesday arrived safely at Ironton yesterday. A battery of the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, under command of Maj. Schofield, started from this city yesterday, and probably reach Pilot Knob this morning. The rebels had not destroyed any more of the bridges. The Big river bridge is being rapidly rebuilt. From Cairo — return of Federal troops from a grand reconnaissance to Columbus. Cairo, Jan. 20. --(Special dispatch to the Chicago Journ
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 16
aris and Danville in danger. From the Memphis Avalanche, of the 20th inst., we take the following: It appears to be generally believed, from all the indications, that the long-threatened advance of the Federals is now in progress. A gentleman who reached this city, in the late train last night, states that the Federals, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee river, the remainder having probably been detailed to look after Forts Henry and Donelson which at last accounts, were still in the quiet possession of our troops, who, confident of success, anxiously a wait the approa
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 16
about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee river, the remainder having probably been detailed to look after Forts Henry and Donelson which at last accounts, were still in the quiet possession of our troops, who, confident of success, anxiously a wait the approach of the enemy. If the Federal should reach Danville and Paris, they will undoubtedly seek to destroy the railroad and telegraphic lines, and thus out off communication between Memphis and Bowling Green. A few days — perhaps a few hours — may bring startling intelligence. Reported Federal victory in Kentucky--the Confederate entrenchment
Cockpit Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 16
a theatre of war within a twelvemonth or less. From the Potomac — a Federal Transport done for. The Fredericksburg Herald, of the 21st inst., says: We have a report that a large transport ship attempted to pass the battery at Cockpit Point, on the Potomac, on Friday, but was brought to by a well-directed fire. The vessel is reported to have been struck — how often we do not know — but with such consequences as induced the very hasty departure of all hands from on board in their small boats, leaving the transport at the mercy of the winds, waves, and Confederates. Unfortunately, our forces at Cockpit Point had no boats with which to go out and bring in the prize, but had sent off to another quarter for small boats. We have not learned any further tidings except that the crew of the transport were taken on board of a tug, which feared an attempt at rescuing the transport. There is evidently much feeling abroad at the escape of the war-ship Pensacola from ou<
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 16
War matters.Federal reports of the battle in Kentucky.interesting from Missouri.&c. &c. &c. From the latest Northern and Southern papers which have been received we make up the following interesting summary of news. Although the news of our defeat in Kentucky lacks official confirmation, still the very reliable information one to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached ta plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Trust
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 16
n the late train last night, states that the Federals, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee miles of Columbus, and encamped on Thursday night in eight of the rebel watch-fires. He afterwards visited the towns of Millburn, Lovelaceville, and Blandville, surveying all the roads as he went. A part of Gen. Smith's command will return to Paducah to-day. Reach sentiment at the North. Forney, in his letter to the Press, from Washington says: "Some of our public men do not hesitate to say that, rather than bring back the seceded States into the Union, they would agree to a p
Kuakatch (Arizona, United States) (search for this): article 16
week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Capt. Chapman and Lieut McHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Truston Polk. Mr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a Brigadier General in the State service. Late from the Rio Grande — important movement of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item: Our Brownsville correspondent gives unimportant piece of information regarding the movements across the Rio G
roves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Capt. Chapman and Lieut McHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Trust
he Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached this city last night to the effect that, yesterday, a large body of rebels, numbering about 5,000 men, in command of Jeff Thompson, advanced upon a Federal detachment of 300 troops, under Col. Mills, at a distance of about twenty-three miles from Ironton, and gave them battle. A desperate conflict ensued, resulting in the loss of many killed and wounded on both sides. The Federals, overpowered by numbers, had, at latest accounts, fallen back a distance of eight miles, leaving a quantity of baggage in the hands of the enemy, and were still retreating towards Pilot Knob. At Pilot Knob considerable alarm existed, and Col. Carlin was making every preparation for the impendi
ant and his staff arrived in town yesterday morning.--General Paine's brigade reached Fort Jefferson on Saturday, and General McClernand's brigade will arrive to-morrow. The object of the expedition, it now appears, was a reconnaissance in force of all that part of Kentucky in which a portion of the operations against Columbus will necessarily be performed, and a demonstration to aid General Buell's right wing. Our forces have been eminently successful, and the engineer corps, under Col. Webster, have a full and accurate knowledge of the country. It is understood that Gen. Smith has taken the camp equipage and whatever was left in Camp Beauregard, the rebels having fled to Columbus. General McClernand's brigade went to within seven miles of Columbus, and encamped on Thursday night in eight of the rebel watch-fires. He afterwards visited the towns of Millburn, Lovelaceville, and Blandville, surveying all the roads as he went. A part of Gen. Smith's command will return to P
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