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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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lligence is not of a character to discourage or dishearten. A dispatch received at the Adjutant General's office yesterday morning from General Beauregard, states that after the fight on Sunday the enemy were largely reinforced by the army under Buell, and that the fight was renewed with great violence on Monday morning, and continued until one o'clock P. M, when our army withdrew in good order, and retired to Corinth, Mississippi. General B. adds, in his telegram, that he was unable to carryeral Beauregard in retiring to this point is commended by those familiar with the topography of the country, and it is confidently believed that he will there be able to meet any force that may be thrown against him. The Federal column under Buell is a heavy one, but it dare not penetrate the interior, where it will be deprived of the efficient aid of gunboats and river transports. As he advances the hostile territory in his rear increase, and the gallant sons of Kentucky and Tennessee, w
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
rom the Southwest is not so favorable as that conveyed in previous dispatches, although our present intelligence is not of a character to discourage or dishearten. A dispatch received at the Adjutant General's office yesterday morning from General Beauregard, states that after the fight on Sunday the enemy were largely reinforced by the army under Buell, and that the fight was renewed with great violence on Monday morning, and continued until one o'clock P. M, when our army withdrew in good ordegram, that he was unable to carry off all the arms and ammunition captured on Sunday. Corinth is near the line dividing the States of Tennessee and Mississippi, and about eighteen miles from the battle-ground of Sunday. The policy of General Beauregard in retiring to this point is commended by those familiar with the topography of the country, and it is confidently believed that he will there be able to meet any force that may be thrown against him. The Federal column under Buell is
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
, when our army withdrew in good order, and retired to Corinth, Mississippi. General B. adds, in his telegram, that he was unable to carry off all the arms and ammunition captured on Sunday. Corinth is near the line dividing the States of Tennessee and Mississippi, and about eighteen miles from the battle-ground of Sunday. The policy of General Beauregard in retiring to this point is commended by those familiar with the topography of the country, and it is confidently believed that he winder Buell is a heavy one, but it dare not penetrate the interior, where it will be deprived of the efficient aid of gunboats and river transports. As he advances the hostile territory in his rear increase, and the gallant sons of Kentucky and Tennessee, who are measurably relieved by this advance, will omit no opportunity to annoy, if not capture and destroy, his transportation trains. Altogether, he will have a rather disagreeable time of it, and the grand object of his mission — the subjug
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
avorable as that conveyed in previous dispatches, although our present intelligence is not of a character to discourage or dishearten. A dispatch received at the Adjutant General's office yesterday morning from General Beauregard, states that after the fight on Sunday the enemy were largely reinforced by the army under Buell, and that the fight was renewed with great violence on Monday morning, and continued until one o'clock P. M, when our army withdrew in good order, and retired to Corinth, Mississippi. General B. adds, in his telegram, that he was unable to carry off all the arms and ammunition captured on Sunday. Corinth is near the line dividing the States of Tennessee and Mississippi, and about eighteen miles from the battle-ground of Sunday. The policy of General Beauregard in retiring to this point is commended by those familiar with the topography of the country, and it is confidently believed that he will there be able to meet any force that may be thrown against him.
weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troops are in admirable spirits, and ready for another fight. Def.
Bushrod Johnson (search for this): article 1
It is not thought the enemy will advance. The weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troops are in admirabl
t the enemy will advance. The weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troops are in admirable spirits, and re
The weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troops are in admirable spirits, and ready for another fight. De
the battlefield. It is not thought the enemy will advance. The weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troop
weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The firing ceased mutually about two o'clock, both armies falling back. The enemy's loss in prisoners is between four and six thousand. Buell's reinforcements on Monday are estimated at thirty thousand. Our troops are in admirable spirits, and ready for another fight. Def.
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