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I shall give in the words of those who performed the labor. Mr. Hoag, who was in charge of the wagons, sent out by Dr. Steiner from Frederick, gives the following account: I left Frederick City in charge of two wagons, well loaded, June twenty-ninth. We fell in with the Twelfth army corps supply-train; but owing to its moving slowly, did not get more than six miles before we were obliged to put up for the night. Tuesday we moved more rapidly, passed through Taneytown, and out on thived two hearty welcome slaps on the shoulder, one from the medical director of the corps, and the other, the surgeon of the division. Major Bush, who accompanied Mr. Hoag, gives his account in the following words: Monday morning, June twenty-ninth. Mr. Hoag and myself left Frederick with two wagon loads, in connection with the train of the Twelfth corps, by order of General Williams to Dr. Steiner. Reached Taneytown, Maryland, Tuesday, P. M., June thirtieth. Wednesday morning, Ju
inster at eleven P. M. first. I broke up my headquarters, which till then had been at Taneytown, and proceeded to the field, arriving there at one A. M. of the second. So soon as it was light I proceeded to inspect the position occupied and to make arrangements for posting several corps as they should reach the ground. By sth his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburgh, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemision, and McLaws's division, of Longstreet's corps, got up to within a mile or two of the town, and bivouacked for the night. Early next (Thursday) morning, the second, Hood's division also got up, and our line of battle was formed. The enemy during the night had succeeded in getting up his entire force — some one hundred and t
rgh, which have been delayed by failure to receive the reports of the several corps and division commanders, who were severely wounded in battle. On the twenty-eighth of June I received orders from the President, placing me in command of the army of the Potomac. The situation of affairs was briefly as follows: The confederate Ewell's corps on the Susquehanna, Harrisburgh, and Columbia; Longstreet's corps at Chambersburgh; and Hill's corps between that place and Cashtown. The twenty-eighth of June was spent in ascertaining the positions and strength of the different corps of the army, but principally in bringing up the cavalry which had been coverings under the orders of Dr. Steiner. Its subsequent operations during the battle week I give in the words of Dr. Steiner from his report already referred to. June 28.--The supply train, with stores from Washington, reported to me during the day, being in charge of Messrs. Bush, Hoag, and Clampitt. Desiring to retain Clampitt t
to Dr. Steiner. It was still doubtful where the collision between the opposing forces would take place. We were prepared to do our work in the front and in the rear, but the emergency might arise in an unexpected point, and we wished to be prepared. A demonstration of the enemy upon the Northern Central Railroad (Baltimore and Harrisburgh) determined me to send out a relief agent in that direction. Accordingly, Mr. James Gall, who had returned from Maryland Heights, was, on the twenty-seventh June, ordered to proceed along the line of that road, to push forward in whatever direction he should learn that a conflict was impending, to acquaint himself with the position of affairs, and to keep the Central office informed of the necessity of forwarding supplies and agents. Mr. Gall was enabled to proceed only to Parkton by rail, from thence he walked to York, a distance of twenty-eight miles. Upon entering the town, he found it, to his surprise, in possession of the enemy. The f
chmond Enquirer account. in camp, near Hagerstown, Md., July 8, 1863. I proceed to-day to give you a hasty sketch of the movements of this army since we crossed the Potomac. As I was not with our advance, under Lieutenant-General Ewell, I shall not be able to give you as full and reliable reports of the movements of his corps up to the battle of Gettysburgh as of the main body of the army, which crossed the Potomac two days after his corps. I learn that Ewell's crossed on the twenty-second June--one portion at Shepherdstown and another at Williamsport, and that the two columns united at Hagerstown. From the latter place, one division — Rhodes's, I think — was pushed on through Greencastle and Chambersburgh to Carlisle, making at all three of these places considerable captures of army supplies — hats, shoes, clothing, and medical stores. Another division — Early's — turned to the right from Chambersburgh and moved on York, on the Northern Central Railroad, when, after a s
July 8th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
G. T. Anderson, Hampton, J. M. Jones, and Jenkins, were also wounded. Brig.-General Archer was taken prisoner. General Pettigrew, though wounded at Gettysburgh, continued in command until he was mortally wounded near Falling Waters. The loss of the enemy is unknown, but from observations on the field, and his subsequent movements, it is supposed that he suffered severely. Respectfully submitted, R. E. Lee, General Richmond Enquirer account. in camp, near Hagerstown, Md., July 8, 1863. I proceed to-day to give you a hasty sketch of the movements of this army since we crossed the Potomac. As I was not with our advance, under Lieutenant-General Ewell, I shall not be able to give you as full and reliable reports of the movements of his corps up to the battle of Gettysburgh as of the main body of the army, which crossed the Potomac two days after his corps. I learn that Ewell's crossed on the twenty-second June--one portion at Shepherdstown and another at Williamsport
f Pennsylvania militia, in which quite a number were taken prisoners, the town surrendered. Early then pushed on to Wrightsville, on the south side of the Susquehanna, where was posted a small body of militia, who fled precipitately at his approach across the river, and burned the bridge. Some few prisoners were taken at Carlisle--two or three hundred--all militia, and they, as also those captured at York and Wrightsville, were immediately paroled and discharged. On the morning of June twenty-fourth, A. P. Hill's corps (the Third) crossed the Potomac at Boteler's Mill, one mile below Shepherdstown, Anderson's division being in the advance. That night the head of Hill's corps reached Boonsboro, which latter place was occupied by Wright's brigade of Anderson's division. From this place we moved on Chambersburgh, via Funkstown, Hagerstown, and Middleburgh, reaching the former on the twenty-seventh. Passing through Chambersburgh on the twenty-seventh, we pushed on to Fayetteville,
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