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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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nty miles south of Corinth, and the place selected for our stand an excellent one to protect the south branches of the Mobile and New-Orleans railroads. The season, as I have said, made it impossible for the enemy to follow, (it was the month of June,) so, finding a supply of good water, and eligible sites for fortifications, we settled down comfortably, and had no fear of consequences. You may imagine Halleck's chagrin on discovering our retreat! as might be expected, the whole North wasdered we could make but a feeble resistance. The country around was only a cotton district, short of agricultural supplies, and connected with the interior and main army at Tullahoma by a single track of railroad, much overworked and unsound. As June advanced, and the rivers began to rise, the smoke of numerous gunboats above and below the city probed that the enemy were busy reconnoitring, and slowly approaching their object. Foundries and workshops were kept busy night and day; timber was
d at our devoted city; but, strange to say, except in some half-dozen instances, I know not one house which was more than slightly injured. The enemy, on the other hand, suffered much from their very inaction. The heats of July and the fever of August told fearfully upon their unacclimated troops, cooped up in their ships amid smoke and heat, and the deathly night-vapors of the land and water. Though suffering extremely in every way, they were farther from realizing their hopes than ever. Itre scattered around the peninsula, where every house was converted into an hospital. The commodores were nonplussed; and as their large fleets lay at anchor on the rippleless copper-colored river, with a cloudless sky, under the scorching sun of August, without the echo of a voice, without the motion of a leaf, or the flapping of ensigns from a breath of air, the cries of sand-cranes flying to and fro reminded one of some river of death, with hospitals for ships and spectres for crews. But
s strong, and would not be diverted. Hundreds of men, both whites and blacks, sank and died under the labor of cutting this canal, before the attempt was discontinued. And still the bombardment progressed. Thousands of shell, round shot, and other missiles were hurled at our devoted city; but, strange to say, except in some half-dozen instances, I know not one house which was more than slightly injured. The enemy, on the other hand, suffered much from their very inaction. The heats of July and the fever of August told fearfully upon their unacclimated troops, cooped up in their ships amid smoke and heat, and the deathly night-vapors of the land and water. Though suffering extremely in every way, they were farther from realizing their hopes than ever. It was computed they had at anchor more than twenty gunboats playing on the city, together with a land force of several thousand men, and scores of transports and flats. Ordnance officers affirmed that they had fired more than t
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