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hundred men. About four hundred unwounded prisoners, ten colors, and twelve field-pieces, were taken from the enemy. We had the means of bringing off but five of these guns. The carriages of five were cut to pieces with an axe, and two were left in another part of the field uninjured, because the captors had no axe. Five Confederate guns without equipments, found at the College Creek wharf, where they had probably passed the winter, had been hauled to Williamsburg that morning, by Major Barbour's orders. As we had no more spare horses and harness than those appropriated to five of the captured guns, these pieces were necessarily left in the road where we found them. Longstreet reported nine thousand men of his division engaged with Hooker's and Kearney's divisions on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field, stated that two-thirds of Smith's division and Peck's brigade were also engaged; and General Couch complimented his division, in orders, fo
ey had probably passed the winter, had been hauled to Williamsburg that morning, by Major Barbour's orders. As we had no more spare horses and harness than those appropriated to five of the captured guns, these pieces were necessarily left in the road where we found them. Longstreet reported nine thousand men of his division engaged with Hooker's and Kearney's divisions on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field, stated that two-thirds of Smith's division and Peck's brigade were also engaged; and General Couch complimented his division, in orders, for its conduct in the battle. As the Federal army, except Franklin's division, had marched but nine miles to the field the day before, by two roads, one cannot understand why four, or even six divisions, if necessary, were not brought into action. The smallness of the force engaged on this occasion greatly strengthened my suspicion that the army itself was moving up York River in transports. We fought
val between themselves and the three corps beyond the Chickahominy. Such an opportunity was soon offered. On the morning of the 30th, armed reconnaissances were made under General D. H. Hill's direction — on the Charles City road by Brigadier-General Rhodes, and on the Williamsburg road by Brigadier-General Garland. No enemy was found by General Rhodes; but General Garland encountered Federal outposts more than two miles west of Seven Pines, in such strength as indicated the presence of aGeneral Rhodes; but General Garland encountered Federal outposts more than two miles west of Seven Pines, in such strength as indicated the presence of a corps at least. This fact was reported to me by General Hill soon after noon. He was informed, in reply, that he would lead an attack upon this enemy next morning. An hour or two later, orders were given for the concentration of twenty-three of our twenty-seven brigades against McClellan's left wing--about two-fifths of his army. The four others were observing the river, from the New Bridge up to Meadow Bridge. Longstreet and Huger were directed to conduct their brigades to D. H. Hill's
army when it should come within reach. Major. General Huger was instructed, at the same time, to prepare to the navy-yard, and instructions were sent to Major-General Huger to march to Richmond. The four divisions ur or five thousand, at Gordonsville; and had halted Huger's division at Petersburg, when on its way to Richmon receive so great an accession. For this object, Huger's division, now reduced to three brigades, One had on was placed on the left of that of D. H. Hill, and Huger's in rear of the interval between the two last-namede right of the Federal army, and that Magruder's and Huger's, crossing by the New Bridge, should form between tthe New Bridge up to Meadow Bridge. Longstreet and Huger were directed to conduct their brigades to D. H. Hils, and to advance to the attack in that order; while Huger's division should march along the Charles City road ps at Fair Oaks. In an hour or two Longstreet's and Huger's division, whom it had not been necessary to bring
J. Longstreet (search for this): chapter 5
attack it. The message was delivered to General Longstreet in my presence, and he referred it to mein road, found no lurkers or stragglers from Longstreet's and Hill's divisions. The day after then the left wing and the Chickahominy, while Longstreet's and D. H. Hill's divisions, their left thr, from the New Bridge up to Meadow Bridge. Longstreet and Huger were directed to conduct their brif the Federal army. Being confident that Longstreet and Hill, with their forces united, would broops in their movements, those of Smith and Longstreet were in position quite early enough. But thnutes drove them off entirely. On my way to Longstreet's left, to combine the action of the two bodd, therefore, and, connecting his right with Longstreet's left, to fill upon the right flank of his Pickett, whose brigade was near the left of Longstreet's and Hill's line, learned that a strong bode flank of the remaining Confederate troops, Longstreet's and Hill's, he would have failed to attack[33 more...]
turned by the eight field-pieces belonging to General R. H. Anderson's command. That officer, observing that a division Hooker's. of Federal troops had entered the wood a thousand yards to the right of Fort Magruder, placed Wilcox's brigade before e dead and wounded of both parties lay, supposed that of the enemy to be from three to five times greater than ours. General Hooker, on oath before the committee on the conduct of the war, said that his division alone lost seventeen hundred men. Abo necessarily left in the road where we found them. Longstreet reported nine thousand men of his division engaged with Hooker's and Kearney's divisions on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field, stated that two-thirdsrates to their camps on Monday, although his statement shows clearly that all his troops and Keyes's Kearney's division; Hooker's was not engaged. that fought there were defeated, and driven back six or seven miles to the shelter of intrenchments pr
ed, at two o'clock next morning, by G. W. Smith's, which was to keep the New Kent road. The baggage was to move next, in rear of which D. H. Hill's and Longstreet's divisions were to march. This order of march was based on the idea that a part of the Federal army might pass us by the river. About four o'clock P. M., the cavalry rear-guard, on the Yorktown road, was driven in, and rapidly followed by the enemy. Brigadier-General McLaws was sent with the two brigades nearest, Kershaw's and Semmes's, to support the rear-guard. He met the enemy near and beyond Fort Magruder, made his dispositions with prompt skill and courage, and quickly drove the Federal troops from the field, taking a piece of artillery. At sunset a rearguard of two brigades of Longstreet's division-Anderson's and Pryor's, commanded by General Anderson-occupied Fort Magruder and four of the little redoubts on its right, and two of those on the left. At daybreak on the 5th, Smith's division and the baggage-trai
the decks of vessels in the river below. On the l7th, the army encamped about three miles from Richmond, in front of the line of redoubts constructed in 1861. Hill's division in the centre, formed across the Williamsburg road; Longstreet's on the right, covering the river road; Magruder's on the left, crossing the Nine-miles road; and Smith's in reserve, behind Hill's left and Magruder's right. Generals Jackson and Ewell, the former commanding as senior officer, were then opposing General Banks, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, still under my direction. The President had placed Brigadier-General J. R. Anderson, with nine thousand men, in observation of General McDowell, who was at Fredericksburg with forty-two thousand men; Brigadier-General Branch, with four or five thousand, at Gordonsville; and had halted Huger's division at Petersburg, when on its way to Richmond, under my orders. That division, estimated by the Secretary of War and General Lee at eighteen thousand a mont
s on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field, stated that two-thirds of Smith's division and Peck's brigade were also engaged; and General Couch complimented his division, in orders, for its conduct in the battle. As the Federal army, except Franklin's division, had marched but nine miles to the field were received from their second line, and they turned to recover their lost position. But to no purpose — they were driven back, fighting, upon their second line-Couch's division at Seven Pines. R. II. Anderson's brigade, transferred by Longstreet to the first line, after the capture of Casey's position, bore a prominent part iGeneral Sumner stated to the committee on the conduct of the war, that he had, in the battle of Fair Oaks, five or six thousand men in Sedgwick's division, part of Couch's, and a battery, and that, after the firing had continued some time, six regiments which he had in hand on the left of the battery charged directly into the woods
osition we had nothing to do but to finish the works begun, between Yorktown and the head of the inundations, and observe the enemy's operations. They were limited to a little skirmishing at long range, and daily cannonading, generally directed at Magruder's left, or Longstreet's right, and the construction of a long line of batteries in front of Yorktown, and beyond the range of our old-fashioned ship-guns. These batteries, our scouts reported, were for about one hundred of the heaviest Parrott guns, and above thirty mortars. A battery on the shore, three miles (pilot's distance) below Yorktown, received the first guns mounted. Shots of the first volley, fired to get the range of the Confederate works, fell in the camp of the reserve, a mile and a half beyond the village. It was evident that the enemy was pursuing the course predicted, and preparing to demolish our batteries on York River. The greater range of his guns would have enabled him to do it without exposure, and a
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