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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry sherman-william-tecumseh
e capital; the other was for the seizure of Atlanta, Ga., the focus of several converging railways. e line of the railway between Chattanooga and Atlanta. There a sharp battle was fought on May 15. Johnston finally pressed on to Marietta and Atlanta, where, towards the middle of July, he was ed to march through the heart of Georgia from Atlanta to the sea, he delegated to General Thomas fuho had pursued him, turned his forces towards Atlanta, his troops destroying all the mills and founer to the Chattahoochee. The railways around Atlanta were destroyed, and on Nov. 14 the forces desherman cut the telegraph wires that connected Atlanta with Washington, and his army became an isola morning of the 14th, when the entire city of Atlanta—excepting its court-house, churches, and dwel covering 200 General Sherman moving out of Atlanta. Map showing country covered in Sherman's is was the brilliant ending of the march from Atlanta to the sea. It opened to Sherman's army a new[1 more...]
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry sherman-william-tecumseh
and raised the streams that the army was compelled to cross higher up, and did not effect the passage until the first week in February. Savannah and its dependencies were transferred to General Foster, then in command of the Department of the South, with instructions to co-operate with Sherman's inland movements by occupying, in succession, Charleston and other places. Sherman notified General Grant that it was his intention, after leaving Savannah, to undertake, at one stride, to make Goldsboro an open communication with the sea by the Newbern Railway. Feints of attacks on Charleston kept Hardee from interfering with Sherman's inland march. Wheeler had been putting obstructions in his pathway to Columbia: but the movements of the Nationals were so mysterious that it distracted the Confederates, who could not determine whether Sherman's objective was Charleston or Augusta. His invasion produced wide-spread alarm. Sherman's army steadily advanced in the face of every obstacle
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry sherman-william-tecumseh
erman's inland march. Wheeler had been putting obstructions in his pathway to Columbia: but the movements of the Nationals were so mysterious that it distracted the began destroying the railway there. On Feb. 18 they began a march directly to Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, driving the Confederates before them whereve the defence of the capital could not be gathered in time. He was in front of Columbia before any adequate force for its defence appeared. Beauregard was in commandhere, and had promised much, but did little. On Feb. 17 the Nationals entered Columbia; and on the same day Charleston, flanked, was evacuated by Hardee (see Charles dwellings, and in the course of a few hours that beautiful city was in ruins (Columbia). Sherman, after destroying the arsenal at Columbia, left the ruined city and Columbia, left the ruined city and pressed on with his forces to Fayetteville, N. C., his cavalry, under Kilpatrick, fighting the Confederate cavalry led by Wheeler many times on the way. He left a bla
arranged two grand campaigns for the year 1864. One, under his own immediate direction, was for the seizure of Richmond, the Confederate capital; the other was for the seizure of Atlanta, Ga., the focus of several converging railways. The latter expedition was led by General Sherman. His army numbered nearly 100,000 men, comprising the Army of the Cumberland, led by Gen. George H. Thomas; the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Gen. J. B. McPherson; and the Army of the Ohio, led by Gen. J. M. Schofield. When, on May 6,. 1864, Sherman began to move southward from the vicinity of Chattanooga, his army was confronted by a Confederate force of 55,000 men, led by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, and arranged in three corps, commanded respectively by Generals Hardee, Hood, and Polk. This army then lay at Dalton, at the parting of the ways —one leading into east Tennessee and the other into west Tennessee. To strike that position in front was, at least, perilous; so Sherman began a series of su
destroyed, and on Nov. 14 the forces destined for the great march were concentrated around the doomed city. Those forces were composed of four army corps, the right wing commanded by Gen. O. O. Howard, and the left wing by Gen. H. W. Slocum. Howard's right was composed of the corps of Generals Osterhaus and Blair, and the left of the corps of Gen. J. C. Davis and A. S. Williams. General Kilpatrick commanded the cavalry, consisting of one division. Sherman's entire force numbered 60,000 infe National army moved steadily forward. At Griswoldsville there was a sharp engagement (Nov. 22) with a portion of Hardee's troops sent up from Savannah, and several brigades of militia. The Confederates were repulsed with a loss of 2,500 men. Howard could have taken Macon after this blow upon its defenders, but such was not a part of Sherman's plan. The Nationals were attacked at the Oconee River while laying a pontoon bridge, but the assailants, largely composed of Wheeler's cavalry, were
toon bridge over the Tennessee at Florence for the invasion of Tennessee, Sherman, who had pursued him, turned his forces towards Atlanta, his troops destroying all the mills and foundries at Rome, and dismantling the railway from the Etowah River to the Chattahoochee. The railways around Atlanta were destroyed, and on Nov. 14 the forces destined for the great march were concentrated around the doomed city. Those forces were composed of four army corps, the right wing commanded by Gen. O. O. Howard, and the left wing by Gen. H. W. Slocum. Howard's right was composed of the corps of Generals Osterhaus and Blair, and the left of the corps of Gen. J. C. Davis and A. S. Williams. General Kilpatrick commanded the cavalry, consisting of one division. Sherman's entire force numbered 60,000 infantry and artillery and 5,500 cavalry. On Nov. 11 Sherman cut the telegraph wires that connected Atlanta with Washington, and his army became an isolated column in the heart of an enemy's countr
There he was slightly wounded, and had three horses shot under him. In May he was made a major-general. From July to November, 1862, he commanded at Memphis; and throughout the campaign against Vicksburg (December, 1862, to July, 1863) his services were most conspicuous and valuable. How fully General Grant appreciated the services of both Sherman and McPherson can be seen from the following letter: headquarters Department of Tennessee, Vicksburg, Miss., July 22, 1863. His Excellency A. Lincoln, President of the United States, Washington, D. C. I would most respectfully but urgently recommend the promotion of Maj.-Gen. W. T. Sherman, now commanding the 15th Army Corps, and Maj.-Gen. J. B. McPherson, commanding the 17th Army Corps, to the position of brigadier-general in the regular army. The first reason for this is their great fitness for any command it may ever become necessary to intrust to them. Second, their great purity of character and disinterestedness in anyth
ommanded one of the three corps in the siege of Vicksburg. After the fall of Vicksburg he operated successfully against Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. In October, 1863, he was made commander of the Department of the Tennessee, and joined Grant at Chattanooga in the middle of November; was in the battle of Missionary Ridge (Nov. 25); and then moved to the relief of Burnside in east Tennessee. When he was called to Chattanooga, he left Gen. J. B. McPherson in command at Vicksburg; but soon after Bragg was driven southward from Chattanooga Sherman suddenly reappeared in Mississippi. At the head of 20,000 troops he made a most destructive raid (February, 1864) from Jackson to the intersection of important railways at Meridian, in that State. His object was to inflict as much injury on the Confederate cause and its. physical strength as possible. He believed in the righteousness and efficacy of making such a war terrible, and the line of his march eastward presented a black path of deso
Sherman moving out of Atlanta. Map showing country covered in Sherman's March to the sea. acres of ground, formed a great conflagration; and, while the fire was raging, the bands played, and the soldiers chanted the stirring air and words, John Brown's soul goes marching on! For thirty-six days that army moved through Georgia, with very little opposition, subsisting off the country. It was a sort of military promenade, requiring very little military skill in the performance, and as littattle, and provisions from Sherman's army, they said, and burn what you cannot carry away. Burn all bridges and block up the roads in his route. Assail the invader in front, flank, and rear, by night and by day. Let him have no rest. And Governor Brown, before he fled from Milledgeville on the approach of the Nationals, issued a proclamation ordering a levy En masse of the whole white population of the State between the ages of sixteen and forty-five, and offering pardon to prisoners in the
r. The Confederates were dispersed. On the same day Kilpatrick fought Wheeler on the railway between Millen and Augusta, drove him from his barricades through Waynesboro, and pushed him 8 miles, while a supporting column of Union infantry under Baird were tearing up the railway and destroying bridges. When Sherman reached Millen, the Union prisoners had been removed; and he pushed on, amid swamps and sands, with the city of Savannah, where Hardee was in command, as his chief object. Kilpatrick and Baird covered the rear of the wing columns between the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers. There was some skirmishing, but no Confederates in force were seen until within 15 miles of Savannah. All the roads leading into that city were obstructed by felled trees, earthworks, and artillery. These were turned, and by Dec. 10 the Confederates were all driven within their lines, and Savannah was completely beleaguered; but the only approaches to it were by five narrow causeways. They had bro
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