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Jonathan F. O'Brien (search for this): chapter 8
ad still remaining in Fort Sumter be removed to the city? If practicable, request Mr. Lacoste to do so at once. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 15th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Disnto the ditch of the water-face, under the direction of the Engineer Department, to form a chemise to the scarp. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 19th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist.I am also directed to inform you that the enemy is constructing a battery in rear of the middle of Black Island. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist.,
for the reduction of Savannah, at least without some notice. Accordingly, Company E, 12th Battalion Georgia Volunteers, has been ordered here to join the rest of the battalion, and it will be well to see that it is replaced by a company of Olmstead's regiment (1st Georgia Volunteers), as there is one company of that regiment already there, and it is desirable to have homogeneity in the composition of these garrisons. There are, moreover, three companies (F, H, and I) of the 54th Regiment (Way's) Georgia Volunteers in the District of Georgia—two at Rosedew, and one at Beaulieu—on heavy artillery duty, which, I have suggested to the General, ought to be brought here for James Island and consolidated with the other six companies for infantry service. Therefore the General Commanding instructs me to lay the matter before you, to investigate whether these companies may not be replaced either from Gordon's or Olmstead's regiment, and ordered here, without material risk of exposing Sav
Pliny Bryan (search for this): chapter 8
stion of General Beauregard, another expedient was resorted to—namely, the capture of one of the enemy's advanced signal-pickets, in the Third Military District. This picket was brought to Charleston, and from him, through the devices of Captain Pliny Bryan, Captain Pliny Bryan, of Maryland, was a member of the Legislature of that State at the beginning of the war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwards, appointed in the Adjutant-General's Department. Captain Pliny Bryan, of Maryland, was a member of the Legislature of that State at the beginning of the war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwards, appointed in the Adjutant-General's Department. He was active, intelligent, zealous, and did good service during the siege of Charleston. He died in the summer of 1864, from exposure to the sun while in the performance of his duties. A. A. G., the much-desired key was finally secured. This important discovery was of incalculable advantage, and enabled the Commanding General to be ever prepared against a surprise. The next morning (September 6th) Admiral Dahlgren asked, Did you succeed last night? and General Gillmore answered, We found
A. H. Colquitt (search for this): chapter 8
two full companies of infantry—that is, the command not to exceed three hundred or fall below two hundred men. One hundred and fifty men and four officers of Colquitt's brigade, of Georgians, were the first detail of infantry introduced into Sumter, under Captain Worthen. Of course you will select the companies, which mus23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,--It is the wish of the Commanding General that you call on Generals Hagood, Colquitt, and Taliaferro, and Colonels Keitt and Harrison, to furnish the names of such officers and men who have specially distinguished themselves for zeal and gallantrver and the regular artillery withdrawn. Not one word of General Beauregard, who stood at his elbow while he spoke; not one word of Generals Taliaferro, Hagood, Colquitt, and Ripley, of Colonels Rhett, Butler, Harris, Keitt, and Harrison, or of the brave men who fought with and under them, was said by Mr. Davis, the Commander-in-
Charles Cowley (search for this): chapter 8
ents of the epaulement were also thrown down upon him. The crews near the shore sought refuge in the recesses of the foot of scarp, those further off in flight. The repulse was decided, and the assault was not renewed. His force is reported to have been four hundred men, but it is believed to have been much larger. In his despatch of September 8th to General Gillmore, Admiral Dahlgren spoke of his assaulting party as being composed of 500 men. In a subsequent paper, referred to by Mr. Charles Cowley in Leaves from a Lawyer's Life, Afloat and Ashore, p. 108, Admiral Dahlgren alludes to the same party as being a fine naval column of 450 picked men. His loss is four men killed, two officers and ninety-two men captured. We secured five stand of colors and five barges; others were disabled and drifted off. One gunboat and Fort Johnson and the Sullivan's Island batteries enfiladed our faces, and contributed to prevent the renewal of the assault. Many of the shots struck the fort. Th
Edward Manigault (search for this): chapter 8
ich we were enabled to decipher the enemy's messages had been in our possession for several weeks. It had been obtained as follows: General Beauregard, in his anxiety to understand the enemy's movements, requested his chief signal officer, Captain Manigault, to endeavor to make out the meaning of the signals exchanged between the Federal land and naval forces. This, however, Captain Manigault was unable to do; then, at the suggestion of General Beauregard, another expedient was resorted to—naCaptain Manigault was unable to do; then, at the suggestion of General Beauregard, another expedient was resorted to—namely, the capture of one of the enemy's advanced signal-pickets, in the Third Military District. This picket was brought to Charleston, and from him, through the devices of Captain Pliny Bryan, Captain Pliny Bryan, of Maryland, was a member of the Legislature of that State at the beginning of the war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwards, appointed in the Adjutant-General's Department. He was active, intelligent, zealous, and did good service during
Z. B. Vance (search for this): chapter 8
r from Messrs. Pullian and Patten, has been received. I have ordered a light battery to report at once to Colonel Williams, at Greenville, S. C. I regret as much as you do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already too small forces a regiment of old troops from the defence of Charleston. So soon as it can be done with safety I will gladly send all the assistance in my power to Governor Vance. I remain, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 4th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—Enclosed is a telegram This telegram, like many others from the same source, proved to be erroneous. received from Major Norris, Chief of Signal Corps, Richmond. The Commanding General wishes you to make all necessary arrangements for the co
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 8
iew. I now address you my views on the reported intentions of General Lee or the War Department, to see if our small available means cannosed to a better purpose. It is evident to my mind that, admitting Lee's movement can prevent Meade from reinforcing Rosecrans and drive the former across the Potomac, Lee cannot prevent Rosecrans from being reinforced by about 40,000 or 50,000 men from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, M be defeated; then, either you must be reinforced from Johnston's or Lee's army, or Middle Georgia would be lost, and the Confederacy, now cuime to organize and discipline them, would retake the offensive, and Lee would be driven back towards Richmond, admitting that his supplies wy on the defensive in Virginia, send you immediately 25,000 men from Lee's army, 5000 or 10,000 more from Johnston's forces, to enable you to they could be concentrated into a strong army. In the mean time, Lee, if necessary, could fall back within the lines around Richmond unti
e points comparatively weak. Alfred Rhett, Col. Comdg. Ormsby Blandino, Major, 1st S. C. Art'y. F., Sept. 5th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—ForS. C., Sept. 9th, 1863. Major Stephen Elliott, Comdg. Fort Sumter, etc., etc.: Major,—The Comman Sept. 14th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I a Sept. 19th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—TheC., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The., Sept. 29th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The., Oct. 8th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—It S. C., Oct. 30th, 1863. Colonel Alfred Rhett, Comdg. Fifth Mil. Dist., etc., etc.; Colonel,—MajC., Oct. 30th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—As
T. E. Gregg (search for this): chapter 8
's Point and Fort Sumter. 2d. Colonel Keitt's captured despatches could not have shown that the garrison of Wagner and Gregg amounted to between 1500 and 1600 effective men on the day of the evacuation (6th inst.), for Colonel Keitt reported thatery and a large supply of excellent ammunition were captured. The pieces of heavy and light artillery left in Wagner and Gregg were more or less damaged, and all with their vents not too much enlarged were spiked. The carriages, chassis, etc., were more or less disabled by the enemy's shots and shells. Only 1800 pounds of ammunition (200 in Wagner and 1000 in Gregg) were left to explode the magazines and bomb-proofs; but, unfortunately, through some accident, the fuses left burning did not . The right-hand gun of this battery cannot be thus altered without exposing it too much to the fire of the enemy from Gregg and Wagner. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Clifton H. Smith, A. A. G.
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