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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

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P. F. August (search for this): chapter 22
I met with some of our converts, who had returned to their families and parents, and they were still true to their profession and evinced a decidedly firm Christian character. The parents of some of those young men have since told me that in place of having the characters and habits of their sons ruined by being in the army they had returned to them as happy Christian men. We also give the testimony of one of the most pious and devoted chaplains in the Army of Northern Virginia. Rev. P. F. August, who served with the gallant Fifteenth Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, writes to us: The 15th Virginia regiment, Corse's brigade, Pickett's division, shared in the blessings of the great revival in the Confederate army. I have the names of about fifty of that regiment who were converted while in the field of service. One of these, J. R. Eddleton, a very young man from Hanover county, was mortally wounded in a skirmish. When borne off the field on a litter he said to his co
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 22
asure that in many brigades convenient houses of worship have been erected, and earnestly desires that every facility consistent with the requirements of discipline shall be afforded the men to assemble themselves together for the purpose of devotion. II. To this end he directs that none but duties strictly necessary shall be required to be performed on Sunday, and that all labor, both of men and animals, which it is practicable to postpone, or the immediate performance of which is not essential to the safety, health, or comfort of the army, shall be suspended on that day. III. Commanding officers will require the usual inspections on Sunday to be held at such times as not to interfere with the attendance of the men on divine service at the customary hour in the morning. They will also give their attention to the maintenance of order and quiet around the place of worship, and prohibit anything that may tend to disturb or interrupt religious exercises. R. E. Lee, General.
C. W. Miller (search for this): chapter 22
ed to an admiring universe, I doubt not many thousands of precious souls converted in the late Confederate army will shine as stars forever and ever in the firmament of glory. The earnest purpose of the home Churches to promote the army revival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who were sent by the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South: Revs. Leo. Rosser and J. C. Granbery in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of
John Stewart Walker (search for this): chapter 22
e army. Their perseverance in serving the Lord proved that they had on the gospel-armor. Many of them lived through the war, and came out of it strong in the faith of God. Others fell on the field of battle instantly killed. They departed covered with the honors of war and with the glory of a saving faith in Christ. Their record below was one of Christian fidelity — on high, no doubt, it was acceptable to God. Among those who deserve to be specially mentioned are the names of Major John Stewart Walker, an upright, conscientious Christian, and one of the purest men I believe that ever died or lived-also Lieutenants Melville C. Willis and Jones Daniels. The last named two were bosom friends, who likewise fell instantly killed. On the same field and about the same time their lives were yielded a sacrifice to the Southern cause. They were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in death they were not separated. Besides those of the 15th, I have quite a large number of names o
ek ago. He preached us a most excellent sermon, and gave us much advice and encouragement privately. His visits to the different brigades can but have the most gratifying effect both upon the chaplains and their congregations. I wish we had just such a man to every division to superintend its spiritual matters. There is a great harvest here, which ought to be reaped at once, and if it should pass this season we fear that much of it will be gathered by the enemy of souls. Rev. J. 0. A. Cook, chaplain 2d Georgia battalion, Wright's brigade, wrote most cheeringly of the work in the same army: It would do your heart good to witness our camp-services, to see the immense throng that crowd our rude chapels, to listen to the soul-stirring music as with one voice and one heart they unite in singing the sweet songs of Zion, and to note the deep interest and solemn earnestness with which they listen to the preaching of the Word. I have never seen anything like it. I can but belie
k of God in the army as well as at home. Soldiers and citizens alike need the revival of God's work. Now is the time specially for the distribution of religious reading matter in the army. When the soldiers are cut off in a measure from the preaching of the Word, they need books, tracts, and papers. Let them come as freely as possible. Well, I suppose the Yankee papers have announced my death, and, perhaps, accompanied the announcement with remarks not very friendly. Thank God, Mr. Editor, your humble brother still lives, and is trying to grow wiser and better in these times of war and cruelty. He lives, he trusts, to preach the gospel to the soldier and the citizen, and to minister comfort to the sick, wounded, and dying, Yes, he has had the privilege, and felt it to be his pleasure and duty, to pray for wounded prisoners taken from the enemy's lines. Yankees, wounded and in prospect of death, have thanked him for his pleadings with God in their behalf, and for pointing
L. B. Payne (search for this): chapter 22
ton; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. Th felt. Good resolutions are being formed by many in every regiment. A number are endeavoring to fulfill their promises made to God upon the eve of and during the late battles. We are expecting and praying for great things. The work of Rev. L. B. Payne in hospitals in Georgia for one month was 27 sermons, distributed 300 papers, 18,000 pages of tracts, and about 32,000 pages of reading matter in books, which he had procured by soliciting donations. Some have been awakened, others professe
o their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a missionary: Dec. 17, 18, and 19.-Services consisted of exhortation, singing, and p
can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a missionary: Dec. 17, 18, and 19.-Services consisted of
far Southwest. Beyond the Mississippi, as Dr. Kavanaugh has already related, his work and that of his co-laborers was greatly blessed of God. In a letter to Bishop Paine, of the M. E. Church, South, he gave a report of the revival and its results in two months: Gen. Fagan's Arkansas Brigade-Members received into Army church, 209; conversions, 85. Gen. Churchill's Arkansas Brigade-Joined the Army church, 112; converted, 35. Gen. Tappan's Arkansas Brigade-Joined, 245; converted, 40. Gen. Parson's Mississippi Brigade-Joined, 85; converted, 35. Total members Army church, 651; conversions, 195. The Army church was organized before my arrival; gotten up by Bro. Martin, (now Bishop M. E. Church, South,) aided by others. It has worked well. In Tappan's brigade, the devoted chaplains have built a large log church, 60 by 80 feet, and are determined to keep up their meetings. I dedicate it next Sunday. I am greatly delighted with my work on this side of the river. I have gone
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