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m to pass all the forts and batteries which may be reasonably expected. The official history of Chief-Engineer Stimers in relation to monitors closes as follows: Chief-Engineer Stimers is responsible for the detailed drawings of the [21] light-draught monitors, and for the calculations as to their displacement. It was expected that they would not draw over six and one-half feet of water, and be out of water amidships about fifteen inches. The contracts were made generally in the spring of 1863, and the vessels were to be furnished in the fall of that year. The Chimo, at Boston, was the first one finished. She was under the entire direction of Chief-Engineer Stimers. Instead of being fifteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in
ded to the embarrassment. Afloat as elsewhere leeks have to be eaten sometimes, whether liked or not, as an old proverb has it. An examination of the chart of Charleston Harbor, with its batteries and obstructions of various kinds, as shown in 1865, and the experience gained subsequent to the attack (bearing in mind, too, the condition of the batteries of the vessels on the 7th of April), would point rather to the probability of disaster than to success, had an attempt been made to enter. fteen inches out of water she was only three inches on an average, showing a miscalculation of one foot. The Department immediately removed Mr. Stimers from the position of general superintendent, and placed the question of what should be done to remedy the difficulties occasioned by his error in the hands of Rear-Admiral Gregory, Chief-Engineer Wood, and Captain Ericsson (letter of Assistant Secretary of the Navy, December 15, 1864, to Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. 3, 1865).
April 7th (search for this): chapter 6
experience gained subsequent to the attack (bearing in mind, too, the condition of the batteries of the vessels on the 7th of April), would point rather to the probability of disaster than to success, had an attempt been made to enter. The reader many of them inside the harbor, to fall into the hands of the enemy. On the withdrawal of the ironclads at 5 P. M., April 7th, the flag-officer had not even a suspicion that he would not resume operations the following morning. The grave injuri through the monitors, as is shown by the orders of April 2d, followed before the receipt of the news of the repulse on April 7th by a letter to the Admiral from the Secretary of the Navy, dated April 11th, as follows: It has been suggested to the D, secured to the bow of the Weehawken, or was closely connected with its construction. He witnessed the attack of the 7th of April from beyond the bar, and had recommended the employment of two rafts that he had brought down, one of which was attach
April 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
April 13, 1863. Hold your position inside the bar near Charleston; or, if you have left it, return to it, and hold it until further orders. Do not allow the enemy to erect new batteries or defences on Morris Island. If he has begun it, drive him out. I do not herein order you to renew the general attack. That is to depend on your discretion or a further order. A. Lincoln. To Admiral Dupont. The following day the President issued further instructions: executive Mansion, April 14, 1863. This is intended to clear up an apparent inconsistency between the recent order to continue operations before Charleston, and the former one to remove to another point in a certain contingency. No censure upon you, or either of you, is intended; we still hope by cordial and judicious co-operation you can take the batteries on Morris Island and Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter. But whether you can or not, we wish the demonstration kept up for a time, for a collateral and very impor
April 11th (search for this): chapter 6
to leave some of our ironclads in the hands of the enemy, which would render it difficult to hold those parts of the coast that are yet in our possession. I have therefore determined to withdraw my vessels. The Department and the people of the North counted confidently on the fall of Charleston through the monitors, as is shown by the orders of April 2d, followed before the receipt of the news of the repulse on April 7th by a letter to the Admiral from the Secretary of the Navy, dated April 11th, as follows: It has been suggested to the Department by the President, in view of operations elsewhere, and especially by the Army of the Potomac, that you should retain a strong force off Charleston, even should you find it impossible to carry the place. You will continue to menace the rebels, keeping them in apprehension of a renewed attack, in order that they may be occupied, and not come North or go West to the aid of the rebels with whom our forces will soon be in conflict. Should y
April 13th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
be but for a few days. I trust your success will be such that the ironclads can be or will have been despatched to the Gulf when this reaches you. There is intense interest in regard to your operations. The writer has italicised the sentence above, as it would exert a controlling influence on Admiral Dupont in fitting for effective service all of the ironclads under him with the least possible delay. Immediately, following is a despatch from the President: executive Mansion, April 13, 1863. Hold your position inside the bar near Charleston; or, if you have left it, return to it, and hold it until further orders. Do not allow the enemy to erect new batteries or defences on Morris Island. If he has begun it, drive him out. I do not herein order you to renew the general attack. That is to depend on your discretion or a further order. A. Lincoln. To Admiral Dupont. The following day the President issued further instructions: executive Mansion, April 14, 1863.
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