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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Hugh McLeod (search for this): chapter 8
no response came, and our troops moved forward. In the rough draft of the report of the commissioners, part of which is now in the writer's possession, it is stated that on the morning of the 9th of July they dispatched from Kickapoo Town Colonel McLeod, John N. Hensford, Jacob Snively, David Rusk, Colonel Len Williams, Moses L. Patton, and — Robinson, with a communication to Bowles. The party was directed to carry a white flag and proceed to the Indian camp, fifteen or twenty miles distanwas also told not to give presents or pay any ransom, which only encouraged the Comanches to renewed depredations. Colonel Fisher conveyed his warning to them in February, 1840, on which they agreed to bring in their prisoners, and talk. Colonel Hugh McLeod and Colonel William G. Cooke were appointed commissioners to assist Fisher at the meeting; and Captain Thomas Howard, with five companies of rangers, was sent to protect the commissioners. The narrative herein given of the occurrences
m Nacogdoches, which was under the command of General Rusk, had arrived some days before and taken a position near the camp of the Cherokees. The promptitude with which these movements were executed at that season of the year (early in July), and the spirit manifested on all occasions by the troops, claim the greatest praise. On the arrival of the regiments of Burleson and Landrum, the whole force was placed under the orders of Brigadier-General Douglass. Pending these movements, Commissioners Eon. David G. Burnet, Thomas J. Rusk, J. W. Burton, James S. Mayfield, and myself, appointed at the instance of Bowles, had been engaged for several days in endeavoring to bring about an arrangement, under your instructions, on an equitable basis for the peaceable removal of the Cherokees. We had been instructed to allow a fair compensation for their improvements, to be ascertained by appraisement, and to be paid for in silver and goods before their removal. The commissioners, in several
ch complicated relations unfitted him to act as agent where the parties had conflicting interests; but he, nevertheless, showed an eagerness to complete this negotiation, that induced him, while commander-in-chief, to leave Refugio for that purpose, as the enemy was advancing. Thus the same day witnessed the conclusion of the treaty and the appearance of Santa Anna before San Antonio; and this ill-omened, futile, and wasteful compact was linked with the fall of the Alamo and the massacre of Fannin's men. Thus, too, it came to be regarded as General Houston's personal act, and as an agreement not binding on the State. The treaty, which was to have engaged the effective cooperation of the Indians, is claimed by Yoakum to have secured their neutrality at least, thus imposing a moral obligation upon Texas to perform it; but his own pages dispel this slender claim. J. H. Sheppard says Texas Almanac, 1872, p. 101. that on the retreat in April, 1836, he was sent by General Houston t
William S. Fisher (search for this): chapter 8
them until they brought in all their white prisoners, and that they must not come again to San Antonio without them. Colonel Fisher, who succeeded Karnes as commandant, received the same orders, and was also told not to give presents or pay any ransom, which only encouraged the Comanches to renewed depredations. Colonel Fisher conveyed his warning to them in February, 1840, on which they agreed to bring in their prisoners, and talk. Colonel Hugh McLeod and Colonel William G. Cooke were appointed commissioners to assist Fisher at the meeting; and Captain Thomas Howard, with five companies of rangers, was sent to protect the commissioners. The narrative herein given of the occurrences at San Antonio is somewhat different from, and morery mark of brutal treatment; all her hair had been singed off, and she had suffered cruelly from other ill-usage. Colonel Fisher began by reminding them that he had forbidden them to come to San Antonio without their prisoners, thirteen of whom t
Brooks Williams (search for this): chapter 8
stern Texas then felt that their danger was imminent. This apparent danger was increased by the threats and movements of the Indians. To ascertain the facts, the Committee of Vigilance at Nacogdoches dispatched agents to the Indians. C. H. Sims and William Sims, who were sent to the Cherokees, reported them to be hostile and making preparations for war; that they were drying beef and preparing meal, and said they were about sending off their women and children; that they had murdered Brooks Williams, an American trader among them; that they said a large body of Indians, composed of Caddoes, Keechies, Ionies, Tawacanies, Wacocs, and Cornanches, were expected to attack the American settlements; that the Cherokees gave every indication of joining them; that the number of warriors embodied on the Trinity was estimated at 1,700; and that Bolles, the principal Cherokee chief, advised the agents to leave the country, as there was danger. M. B. Menard, who was sent to the Shawnee, Delawa
David Rusk (search for this): chapter 8
th of July they dispatched from Kickapoo Town Colonel McLeod, John N. Hensford, Jacob Snively, David Rusk, Colonel Len Williams, Moses L. Patton, and — Robinson, with a communication to Bowles. The ere conversing with the messengers, six more Indians joined them and announced the advance of General Rusk's regiment-upon which the whole party of Indians rallied around our messengers in a hostile a Indians was posted back of a hill some three hundred yards from the place for holding the talk. Rusk's regiment was immediately ordered up, and posted about a quarter of a mile off. The commissionercampment of Bowles on the Neches; Landrum moving up the west bank. The regiments of Burleson and Rusk found the Indians about six miles beyond their abandoned village, occupying a ravine and thicket. was ordered to move forward and sustain the spy company in the event the enemy made a stand; and Rusk, with one battalion of his regiment, to move up and sustain in like manner Burleson and the spy
J. H. Sheppard (search for this): chapter 8
o; and this ill-omened, futile, and wasteful compact was linked with the fall of the Alamo and the massacre of Fannin's men. Thus, too, it came to be regarded as General Houston's personal act, and as an agreement not binding on the State. The treaty, which was to have engaged the effective cooperation of the Indians, is claimed by Yoakum to have secured their neutrality at least, thus imposing a moral obligation upon Texas to perform it; but his own pages dispel this slender claim. J. H. Sheppard says Texas Almanac, 1872, p. 101. that on the retreat in April, 1836, he was sent by General Houston to summon the Coshatties to his aid. Though long domiciled in Texas, and the most friendly of all the tribes, they would not even consider the request. It may be assumed that General Houston did not spare even more strenuous efforts to enlist the powerful Cherokees, with whom he was familiar. Though the Coshatties stood aloof and were sometimes implicated in acts of hostility, yet,
William G. Cooke (search for this): chapter 8
eaty would be made with them until they brought in all their white prisoners, and that they must not come again to San Antonio without them. Colonel Fisher, who succeeded Karnes as commandant, received the same orders, and was also told not to give presents or pay any ransom, which only encouraged the Comanches to renewed depredations. Colonel Fisher conveyed his warning to them in February, 1840, on which they agreed to bring in their prisoners, and talk. Colonel Hugh McLeod and Colonel William G. Cooke were appointed commissioners to assist Fisher at the meeting; and Captain Thomas Howard, with five companies of rangers, was sent to protect the commissioners. The narrative herein given of the occurrences at San Antonio is somewhat different from, and more detailed than, any account given elsewhere, and is derived from notes of conversations held with General Johnston twenty years ago, and taken down at the time. General Johnston had resigned before the catastrophe ; but there
n the Sabine, under orders to execute the treaty of 1831, and prevent. hostilities by the emigrant United States Indians. A hearty sympathizer with Texas, he used with energy his influence and power to keep the Indians peaceable. He sent Lieutenant Bonnell to inform them of his instructions, and of his intention to use force if necessary to carry them out. Bonnell found that Manuel Flores, a Mexican agent, had been among them, exerting every effort to induce them to declare war on Texas. IBonnell found that Manuel Flores, a Mexican agent, had been among them, exerting every effort to induce them to declare war on Texas. Ibid., vol. II., p. 167. General Gaona, at the head of a motley host of Mexicans and Indians, did not debouch from the forests of the Upper Trinity, but was making his way from Bastrop to San Felipe. Bolles, the Cherokee chief, indignant at the supposed suspicion of his good faith and pacific intentions, sent in his denial. Ibid., vol. II., p. 157. Yoakum adds (vol. II., page 170): There is no doubt but that the savages were collected in large numbers on the frontier, were greatly exc
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 8
y letter to the Secretary of War. He then requests that the Government will prevent the execution of a contract for the introduction of 24,000 Creeks into Texas. On the same day, the Committee of Vigilance for Nacogdoches also wrote to President Jackson, giving the details of the aforesaid contract, pointing to its violation of the treaty of 1831, and soliciting the interference of the United States Government; praying that a sparse and defenseless population be protected from the evils th manifested on the frontiers of Georgia and Alabama. Niles's Register, vol. XLIX., p. 16Q. This letter was signed by Sam Houston and five others. Mr. Castello, Mexican charge d'affaires, offered the same remonstrance, October 14, 1835. President Jackson took the steps necessary to prevent the threatened irruption. In the beginning of the Texan Revolution, the Consultation, a provisional government, representing the municipalities, met November 3, 1835. On November 13th, on the motion
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