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Thomas W. Hall (search for this): chapter 56
e went out on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a short distance from the city, for the purpose of looking at some land which he thought of purchasing. He was standing near the railroad track with some friends, among whom was Mr. Thomas W. Hall, Jr., a prominent journalist and lawyer of this city, and who is now City Solicitor of Baltimore. Mr. Davis was not aware that there had been a riot in the city, and as a car containing the troops came by, he incautiously shook his fist at tre for one of real hostility and, probably, thrown off his balance by the fearful occurrences of the day, raised his gun and fired. The unfortunate man, who had been laughing and chatting with his friends a moment before, fell into their arms. Mr. Hall asked him if he was hurt. I am killed, was all he said. When the news of Mr. Davis' death reached the city, it added fuel to the flames. Marshal Kane's three hundred and fifty policemen were almost powerless in the face of the mob, which m
T. Parkin Scott (search for this): chapter 56
her with the few extremists who were openly in favor of coercion. Of this class the most prominent were the late Judge T. Parkin Scott, then prominent at the bar, and William Byrne, the famous politician and gambler. Byrne was the recognized head man of good address and strong sense, kind and liberal, he carried with him a large clientele of adventurous spirits. Mr. Scott represented the soberer, but not less aggressive, wing of the extremist faction. One of the most curious features o a meeting of the military organization known as the Maryland National Volunteers was held under the presidency of Mr. T. Parkin Scott, and inflammatory speeches were made. At two o'clock two trains, containing twenty-one cars, which had left Harriby the Mayor, as follows: Washington, April 20th, 1861. To Mayor Brown, Baltimore: We have seen the President and General Scott. We have from the former a letter to the Mayor and Governor, declaring that no troops shall be brought through Balti
Philip S. Miles (search for this): chapter 56
the street, and succeeded in keeping back the mob. This was one of the most exciting episodes of the riot. The list of the killed and wounded was as follows: Soldiers killed-Addison O. Whitney, a young mechanic, of Lowell, Massachusetts; Luther C. Ladd, another young mechanic, also from Lowell; Charles A. Taylor, decorative painter, from Boston, and Sumner II. Needham, a plasterer from the same city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, Francis Maloney, Sebastian Gill, William Maloney, William Reed, Michael Murphy, Patrick Griffith--12. Wounded-Frank X. Ward, Coney, James Myers, and a boy whose name was not ascertained-4. The fact that more of the troops were not killed is to be ascribed to the fact that the citizens had no arms except paving-stones. Many more of the citizens were wounded beside those whose names were returned, and, perhaps, some more were ki
Michael Murphy (search for this): chapter 56
d wounded was as follows: Soldiers killed-Addison O. Whitney, a young mechanic, of Lowell, Massachusetts; Luther C. Ladd, another young mechanic, also from Lowell; Charles A. Taylor, decorative painter, from Boston, and Sumner II. Needham, a plasterer from the same city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, Francis Maloney, Sebastian Gill, William Maloney, William Reed, Michael Murphy, Patrick Griffith--12. Wounded-Frank X. Ward, Coney, James Myers, and a boy whose name was not ascertained-4. The fact that more of the troops were not killed is to be ascribed to the fact that the citizens had no arms except paving-stones. Many more of the citizens were wounded beside those whose names were returned, and, perhaps, some more were killed. The lower classes generally concealed their injuries. The death of Mr. Robert W. Davis was one of the most tragic incidents of
Isaac R. Trimble (search for this): chapter 56
Lincoln and his Cabinet were greatly annoyed by this fire in the rear, and it was decided that the city must be reduced to submission as soon as possible. The President and his advisers wisely concluded, however, to allow things to remain as they were until the excited passions of the multitude had subsided. After the retreat of the volunteer troops from Ashland, the city was placed under patrol, guard-houses were established, and every precaution was taken to prevent a surprise. Colonel Isaac R. Trimble, who afterward became a general in the Confederate service, was placed in command of the ununiformed volunteers, and took possession of the Northern Central Railroad depot, where a regular camp was established. A curious feature of the preparations for defense was the tender, on the part of several hundred colored men, of their services against the Yankees! The Mayor thanked them for the offer, and informed them that their services would be called for if required. Colonel Huge
George William Brown (search for this): chapter 56
he Mayor of Baltimore, at the time, was George William Brown, now Chief Judge of the Supreme Bench oI think I may say, with perfect truth, that Mayor Brown and the Chief of Police, notwithstanding there about to enter the city was received by Mayor Brown about ten o'clock. Mr. Brown at once repairMr. Brown at once repaired to the office of the Police Commissioners, but found that the Marshal of Police had already gone the scene. What followed is best given in Mayor Brown's own words: On arriving at the heareat respect, your obedient servant, George Wm. Brown, Mayor. To His Excellency, Abraham Linco follows: Washington, April 20th, 1861. To Mayor Brown, Baltimore: We have seen the President a. In response to the general sentiment, Mayor Brown, on Saturday morning, issued the following:the office of the Marshal of Police. George Wm. Brown, Mayor. The promptness and heartine feared: camp at Relay, Saturday, P. M. To Mayor Brown: Sir:--I represent General Butler at thi[4 more...]
William Byrne (search for this): chapter 56
The second class was composed of more advanced Southern sympathizers, together with the few extremists who were openly in favor of coercion. Of this class the most prominent were the late Judge T. Parkin Scott, then prominent at the bar, and William Byrne, the famous politician and gambler. Byrne was the recognized head of that class which advocated armed resistance to the passage of the troops from the first, and, with his companions, did inconceivable damage by loud talk and bravado. He waByrne was the recognized head of that class which advocated armed resistance to the passage of the troops from the first, and, with his companions, did inconceivable damage by loud talk and bravado. He was, at the time, the most influential man in Baltimore with that large class of hot-headed young men, ward politicians, gamblers, floaters, idlers, etc., who are to be found in every large city. A man of good address and strong sense, kind and liberal, he carried with him a large clientele of adventurous spirits. Mr. Scott represented the soberer, but not less aggressive, wing of the extremist faction. One of the most curious features of the riot was the attitude of the city and State gove
Edward G. Parker (search for this): chapter 56
your city, and prevent these men from leaving town. They are coming in wagons, on horses, and on foot, we are informed. We are also told that a considerable force is approaching from the west, probably Point of Rocks, to attack on that side, and co-operate with the Baltimore mob, with whom they have constant communication. Mr. Clark, whom I have already sent to you, will tell something about it. It may be all a sham, but the evidence is very cumulative, and from several sources. Edward G. Parker, Aide-de-Camp. It was all a sham. The attack existed only in the fertile imaginations of General Butler's informants. Quiet had for some days been completely restored in Baltimore. A number of the prominent agitators had gone South, and the riotous element — what there was left of it — was without leaders. On the night of the 13th of May, General Butler, with a strong force of volunteers, moved from the Relay House to Federal hill — an elevation commanding the harbor of Baltimore<
William R. Clark (search for this): chapter 56
owell; Charles A. Taylor, decorative painter, from Boston, and Sumner II. Needham, a plasterer from the same city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, Francis Maloney, Sebastian Gill, William Maloney, William Reed, Michael Murphy, Patrick Griffith--12. Wounded-Frank X. Ward, Coney, James Myers, and a boy whose name was not ascertained-4. The fact that more of the troops werehorses, and on foot, we are informed. We are also told that a considerable force is approaching from the west, probably Point of Rocks, to attack on that side, and co-operate with the Baltimore mob, with whom they have constant communication. Mr. Clark, whom I have already sent to you, will tell something about it. It may be all a sham, but the evidence is very cumulative, and from several sources. Edward G. Parker, Aide-de-Camp. It was all a sham. The attack existed only in the ferti
A. W. Bradford (search for this): chapter 56
rwhelmingly against secession. On the 10th of January, 1861, in answer to a call published in the newspapers, a mass meeting was held at the Maryland Institute for the adoption of measures favorable to the perpetuation of the Union of the States. This. meeting was one of the largest and most enthusiastic which had ever been held in the city. Every available spot was occupied, and the officers and speakers comprised some of the best citizens of Baltimore, among them Reverdy Johnson, Governor Bradford, and Judge Pearre. Subsequently, another mass meeting was held of citizens in favor of restoring the constitutional union of the States, in which the Hon. R. M. McLane, Mr. S. Teackle Wallis, Hon. Joshua Vansant, Dr. A. C. Robinson, and other well-known Southern sympathizers took an active part. Even as late as April 12th, when the siege of Fort Sumter.had begun, and only one week before the riot, two men were assaulted and mobbed, one on Baltimore, the other on South street,for wear
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