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Sutherland (search for this): chapter 5
never attend auctions; never witness examinations; seldom, if ever, see the negroes lashed. They do not know negro slavery as it is. They do not know, I think, that there is probably not one boy in a hundred, educated in a slave society, who is ignorant (in the ante-diluvian sense) at the age of fourteen. Yet, it is nevertheless true. They do not know that the inter-State trade in slaves is a gigantic commerce. Thus, for example, Mrs. Tyler, of Richmond, in her letter to the Duchess of Sutherland, said that the slaves are very seldom separated from their families! Yet, statistics prove that twenty-five thousand slaves are annually sold from the Northern slave-breeding to the Southern slave-needing States. And I know, also, that I have seen families separated and sold in Richmond; and I know still further, that I have spoken to upwards of five hundred slaves in the Carolinas alone who were sold, in Virginia, from their wives and children. Ladies generally see only the South-Sid
Stephen A. Douglas (search for this): chapter 5
e very seldom separated from their families! Yet, statistics prove that twenty-five thousand slaves are annually sold from the Northern slave-breeding to the Southern slave-needing States. And I know, also, that I have seen families separated and sold in Richmond; and I know still further, that I have spoken to upwards of five hundred slaves in the Carolinas alone who were sold, in Virginia, from their wives and children. Ladies generally see only the South-Side View of slavery. Yet Mrs. Douglas, of Norfolk — a comely woman — was confined in a Virginia penitentiary for the crime of teaching free colored children to read. If the woman of the South knew slavery as it is, she would not stand alone in her memorable protest against it. For young unmarried men are not the only sinners that slavery creates in the Southern States. A majority, I believe, of the married men in South Carolina support colored mistresses also. A Fugitive poem. I wish to conclude this record of my se
John Mitchel (search for this): chapter 5
sses also. A Fugitive poem. I wish to conclude this record of my second trip with an anti-slavery poem, written by my noble and gifted friend, William North, during the contest on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, at the time when John Mitchel, of unhappy memory, gave utterance to his longings for a plantation in Alabama, well stocked with fine fat negroes. It is indelibly associated in my memory with the recollections of my long journey; for often, when alone, I repeated it aloud lars and of cents, Prayer to the Prince of Darkness, From a craven army's tents. II. Let an Irish renegado, Born a slave of slavish race, Bend before the Southern Baal, In his mantle of disgrace: He who turned his back on honor, Alluding to Mitchel's alleged breaking of his parole of honor. Well may cringe to slavers grim, Well may volunteer to rivet Fetters on the negro's limb. III. But the poet has no pity On the human beast of prey, Freely speaks he, though the heavens And the earth
Scotchmen (search for this): chapter 5
slaves. I have been their favorite and confidant wherever I have gone, because I never once adopted the shiftless policy of addressing them as if conscious of being a scion of a nobler race. The foreign population of the South. I am sorry to say that the Irish population, with very few exceptions, are the devoted supporters of Southern slavery. They have acquired the reputation, both among the Southerners and Africans, of being the most merciless of negro task-masters. Englishmen, Scotchmen and Germans, with very few exceptions, are either secret abolitionists or silent neutrals. An Englishman is treated with far more and sincerer respect by the slaves than any American. They have heard of Jamaica; they have sighed for Canada. I have seen the eyes of the bondmen in the Carolinas sparkle as they talked of the probabilities of a war with the old British. A war with England Now, would, in all probability, extinguish Southern slavery forever. A Southern requiem. It is sa
Christian (search for this): chapter 5
ack. Mass'r, he added, I's heerd dat in England, a colored man is treated jest as well as dey do white folks. Is dat true, mass'r? I believe so, I replied. Is colored people treated as well as white folks at de North? Why, no, I was forced to reply, not quite. There is a little prejudice everywhere, a great deal in some places, against them. But still, at the North, a colored person need never be insulted by a white man, as he is here, unless he be a coward, or a non-resistant Christian. He may strike back. It would not do to strike back here, would it? Oh Lor‘, no! Mass'r, said the slave, looking as if frightened by the mere idea of such a thing; dey would shoot us down jest as soon as if we was cats. Well, I resumed, a colored man at the North may strike back, and not be shot down. I then related an incident, of which I was an eye witness. The last time that I travelled from Albany to Buffalo, a few months ago, there was a colored man in the cars with us.
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 5
rds italicized are so marked by the orator. Henry Berry's opinion. The third speech, delivered by Henry Berry, of Jefferson, opens in these words: Mr. Speaker: Coming from a county in which there are 4,000 slaves, being myself a slaveholropean Democrats. From Wisconsin to Georgia, I have frequently found men who did not fear to laugh at the doctrines of Jefferson as rhetorical absurdities; but, in the Seaboard Slave States, I have yet to meet the first Southerner who believes thatts the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them. Kentucky indorsed this doctrine through the pen of Thomas Jefferson: The several States, so the passage reads, who formed the instrument being sovereign and independent, have the unvereignties, of all unauthorized acts done under color of that instrument is the rightful remedy. As late as 1825, Mr. Jefferson adhered to this doctrine. See his letter to William B. Giles, dated December, 1825. The Southern Quarterly Review
th at a well Helplessness at table the Chambermaid's opinion why slaves steal the Fugitive slave act Southern Directions how to make it inoperative Ditto of the Dred Scott decision is slavery a local institution and an evil? opinion of Gov. Wilson, of South Carolina forward! the Peanut Seller's Triumph, Self-educated slaves. the population of Augusta, as I have already said, was estimated at twenty thousand. Yet it supports only two daily papers, both of which have but a limitees not suit the South now to admit that slavery is a local institution. It is national, and a blessing now, and claims, the protection of national institutions. It may be well, therefore, to remind the South of her old opinions. Read what Governor Wilson said in his message to the South Carolina legislature — opinions which were enthusiastically indorsed by the politicians and the press of the State. It was during the days of Judge Hoare's mission: There should be a spirit of concert an
I. Virginia (search for this): chapter 5
My second trip. I. Virginia. Preliminary words on insurrection I start again Chesterfield county facts social reunions North and South the poor whites and slavery education and slavery a know-nothing yet wise negro boy farming Utensils guano and negroes the Slaveocracy and the poor, Preliminary words on insurrection. my opinion of the slaveholders, and my feelings toward them, were greatly modified during my residence in Savannah. I saw so much that was noble, generous and admirable in their characters; I saw so many demoralizing pro-slavery influences — various, attractive, resistless — brought to bear on their intellects from their cradle to their tomb, that from hating I began to pity them. It is not at all surprising that the people of the South are so indifferent to the rights of the African race. For, as far as the negro is concerned, the press, the pulpit, the bench, the bar, and the stump, conspire with a unity of purpose and pertinacity of ze
William North (search for this): chapter 5
th proslavery opinions four reasons property in man is robbery of man slavery a cowardly institution Prejudice of race city, plantation, and hired-out country slaves a black Rothschild why the Southern ladies are pro-slavery a poem by William North, About Southern women and Northern travellers chiefly. I remained in Montgomery two or three weeks; sailed down the romantic Alabama to Mobile; in that place rambled for twenty-four hours; and then entered the steamer for the city of Ne States. A majority, I believe, of the married men in South Carolina support colored mistresses also. A Fugitive poem. I wish to conclude this record of my second trip with an anti-slavery poem, written by my noble and gifted friend, William North, during the contest on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, at the time when John Mitchel, of unhappy memory, gave utterance to his longings for a plantation in Alabama, well stocked with fine fat negroes. It is indelibly associated in my
d get away, I would n't come back. Mass'r, he added, I's heerd dat in England, a colored man is treated jest as well as dey do white folks. Is dat true, mass'r? I believe so, I replied. Is colored people treated as well as white folks at de North? Why, no, I was forced to reply, not quite. There is a little prejudice everywhere, a great deal in some places, against them. But still, at the North, a colored person need never be insulted by a white man, as he is here, unless he be a coe North, I said. Yes, sah, said the slave, who seemed to be satisfied with my appearance, he is a very hard master. Have you ever run away? Yes; I have run away twice. Did you run North? No, he replied; I am told no one kin get to de North from here without being taken. Besides, I do n't know de way. How far did you run? I just went round to de next county, he said. If you knew the way to the North, would you try to get there? I inquired. Would you run the risk of bei
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