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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Burnsville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
d proceeded to take military possession. All the transports, 69 in number, conveying nearly 40,000 men, were soon debarking the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where the railroad was destroyed. Gen. Sherman's first division was next March 14. conveyed up the river to Tyler's Landing, just across the Mississippi State line; whence the 6th Ohio cavalry was dispatched to Burnsville, on the Memphis and Charleston road, some miles eastward of Corinth, which was likewise destroyed without resistance. The expedition then returned unmolested to Savannah. These easy successes, and the fact that no enemy came near or seemed to meditate annoyance, must have imbued our leading officers with a contempt for the power or the prowess of their enemy; since our regiments, as they arrived, were mainly debarked at Pittsburg Landing, on the side of the Tennessee nearest to and wit
Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
by a more easterly route, advancing through Murfreesboroa, Shelbyville, Fayetteville, to Huntsville, Ala., which he surprised at day-light, April 9. capturing 17 locomotives and a large number of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of a life. He took April 29. Bridgeport, Ala., with a force of five regiments, by striking rapidly and attacking from a quarter whence he was not looked for, driving out a force nearly equal in number to his own, with a loss of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inc
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ma. Battle of Mill Spring capture of Fort Henry naval bombardment of Fort Donelson Gen. Pihis Railroad, two strong and spacious works; Fort Henry, commanding the Tennessee from its eastern bexpected to support each other if assailed. Fort Henry, situated on a point or bend of the river, a ascended that stream to within ten miles of Fort Henry, where his transports halted, Feb. 4-5. whesitation in the attack; when, after an Forts Henry and Donelson. hour's mutual cannonade, a 24g force was overtaken, some three miles from Fort Henry, by our cavalry, who were easily repulsed, be — was a much larger and stronger work than Fort Henry, covering a level plateau of nearly a hundreing it with troops or supplies, crossed from Fort Henry Feb. 12. to the neighborhood of Donelson,ut 17,000. Directly after the capture of Fort Henry, Commander Phelps, with the wooden gunboats y strengthened, to the Tennessee, just above Fort Henry, where several gunboats and a large number o
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
here the railroad was destroyed. Gen. Sherman's first division was next March 14. conveyed up the river to Tyler's Landing, just across the Mississippi State line; whence the 6th Ohio cavalry was dispatched to Burnsville, on the Memphis and Charleston road, some miles eastward of Corinth, which was likewise destroyed without resistance. The expedition then returned unmolested to Savannah. These easy successes, and the fact that no enemy came near or seemed to meditate annoyance, must havlight, April 9. capturing 17 locomotives and a large number of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropri
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Iii. Kentucky--Tennessee--Alabama. Battle of Mill Spring capture of Fort Henry naval bomMitchel repossesses Huntsville and most of North Alabama. the river Tennessee, taking rise in the in a generally W. S. W. direction, entering Alabama at its N. E. corner; and, after a detour of ss, toward the lower end of its course through Alabama, and thence by smaller boats at high stages otraverses very much as the Tennessee does northern Alabama, passing Nashville, its capital, bending lable force, consisting of six Tennessee, one Alabama, and one Mississippi regiments of infantry, s00 Kentuckians, and a thin regiment each from Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas. The fort was commandedxpected appearance of the National flag in North Alabama, where slaves were comparatively few, and This force, together with the remnants of two Alabama and one Tennessee regiment, made a large bodyport, but holding firmly and peaceably all of Alabama north of that river. Had he been even modera
Prestonburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tumn of 1861 and the Winter following. The close of 1861 left Gen. Humphrey Marshall, commanding the Confederate forces in south-eastern Kentucky, intrenched at Paintville, Johnson county, intent on gathering supplies and recruiting. Col. James A. Garfield, of Ohio, commanding a Union brigade consisting of the 42d Ohio, 14th Kentucky, and a squadron of Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Jan. 7, 1862. without resistance, and pushing on to Prestonburg, Floyd county; hear which town, at the forks of Middle creek, he encountered Marshall, whom he put to flight with little loss on either side. Garfield reported his full strength in this engagement at 1,800, and estimated that of Marshall at 2,500. Marshall was obliged to retreat into Virginia. Cumberland Gap was abandoned without resistance to the Unionists next month; About Feb. 22. and Gen. Garfield, with 600 men, made a rapid excursion March 16. to Pound Gap, where he surprised a R
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
the Tennessee does northern Alabama, passing Nashville, its capital, bending N. W. into Kentucky so of its garrison. Gen. Gideon J. Pillow Of Nashville, Tennessee. had been in command there Sinor is army a line of retreat up river toward Nashville. The attack of Pillow on our right, held bycon creek, Johnston commenced his retreat on Nashville; so that, when Mitchel had reached Feb. 1t Gen. Johnston had decided not to fight for Nashville, but to continue his retreat; which he did, protect and preserve the public property in Nashville until it could be regularly turned over to ta of six gunboats, apparently for service at Nashville; but, when all was ready, dropped down the Mo fight losing battles for Bowling Green and Nashville, and had thus brought off his army intact anthe Ohio had been delayed on its march from Nashville, repairing roads and rebuilding the bridge ol, with a division of Buell's army, had left Nashville simultaneously with his commander, but by a [13 more...]
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ried consultations and whispered adicus in every quarter, whence bank directors rushed to impel specie and other valuables toward the cars, soon to bear them to Chattanooga, to Columbia, and other points of comparative safety. Gov. Harris and his Legislature, with the State archives and treasure, betook themselves swiftly to MemphShiloh, the surviving Rebel leader dispatched a messenger to Corinth with this exhilarating dispatch for Richmond: battle-field of Shiloh, Via Corinth and Chattanooga, April 6th, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General: We have this morning attacked the enemy in strong position in front of Pittsburg; and, after a severe ba he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have captured Chattanooga; which was assailed, June 6. under his orders, by Gen. Negley, who was driven off by a Rebel force under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. Mitchel's activity and energy
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
thin reach, by refusing to fight losing battles for Bowling Green and Nashville, and had thus brought off his army intact and undemoralized; retreating across the Tennessee and into a region at once undevastated and unappalled by war, full of resources, wherein devotion to the Union had been utterly suppressed, if not eradicated, and whence, by a net-work of railroads and telegraphs, he communicated easily with Richmond, and with every portion of the Cotton States. The recent evacuation of Columbus by Polk was probably ordered by him, in obedience to his policy of concentrating around Corinth the greatest possible force, with intent to rush upon and overwhelm the Union army, so carelessly encamped just before him on the hither bank of the Tennessee. Having a spy in nearly every dwelling in southern Tennessee, he was doubtless aware that the command of that army had just been turned over by Gen. C. F. Smith, an experienced and capable soldier, to Gen. Grant, so recently from civil lif
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
g the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where the railroad was destroyed. Gen. Sherman's first division was next March 14. conveition near our lines. Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was thereupon ordered out, and advanced to Adamsville, on the road to Purdy; but, meeting no opponent, after passing a night in drenching rain, it returned to its camp. On Saturday, there was firin, whereof the carriage had been disabled. Lew. Wallace was at Crump's Landing, with his force extended on the road to Purdy, when he received, at 11 1/2 A. M., Grant's order to bring his division into the fight. He had been anxiously awaiting t Railroad at Glendale, three miles farther, and partially destroying it; while the Ohio road was in like manner broken at Purdy. Col. Elliott, with two regiments of cavalry, was dispatched on the night of the 27th to flank Corinth and cut the rai
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