hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Braxton Bragg 454 2 Browse Search
J. C. Pemberton 439 1 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 348 0 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 335 5 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 299 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 292 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 283 1 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 226 0 Browse Search
Grant 206 72 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. Search the whole document.

Found 603 total hits in 114 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Bondurant (search for this): chapter 5
ied a line of rifle-pits, strengthened by a redoubt, and covered by abatis. Here the resistance was obstinate; for the Federal troops, commanded by an officer of tried courage, fought as soldiers usually do under good leaders, and time and vigorous efforts were required to drive them from their position. But the resolution of Garland's and George B. Anderson's brigades, that pressed forward on the left through an open field, under a destructive fire; the admirable service of Carter's and Bondurant's batteries, and a skillfully combined attack upon the Federal left, under General Hill's direction, by Rodes's brigade in front, and that of Rains in flank, were finally successful, and the enemy abandoned their intrenchments. Just then reinforcements were received from their second line, and they turned to recover their lost position. But to no purpose — they were driven back, fighting, upon their second line-Couch's division at Seven Pines. R. II. Anderson's brigade, transferred by
r's and Kearney's divisions on the right. General Sumner, the ranking Federal officer on the field,eral McClellan's troops advanced very slowly. Sumner's, Franklin's, and Porter's corps, were on ands. The left, however, was thrown back to face Sumner's corps at Fair Oaks. In an hour or two Longs-General Hatton, of Tennessee, killed; and General Sumner's was twelve hundred and twenty-three, acctream, which had swept away their bridges, and Sumner's corps at Fair Oaks was six miles from those nited See map. on the front and left flank of Sumner's corps. Such advantage of position and supernd fell back to their camps on Monday. General Sumner stated to the committee on the conduct of nd the railroad and Fair Oaks, was confronting Sumner's corps. General Sumner's extravagant staten less than one hundred thousand, nor that of Sumner's corps less than twenty thousand; nor his fors than thirteen or fourteen thousand. General Sumner's corps was united at Fair Oaks Saturday e[1 more...]
nemy until the 26th of June, because he was employed, from the 1st until then, in forming a great army, by bringing, to that which I had commanded, fifteen thousand General Holmes told me in General Lee's presence, just before the fight began on the 31st, that he had that force ready to join me when the President should give the order. I have also the written testimony of Colonel Archer Anderson, then of General Holmes's staff, that he brought that number into General Lee's army. men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, which the victories of Cross Keys and Port Republic had rendered disposable.
y it: it was too soon, however. We should have gained the advantage fully by a day's delay. This would also have given us an accession of about eight thousand men that arrived from the south next morning, under Major-General Holmes and Brigadier-General Ripley; they had been ordered to Richmond without my knowledge, nor was I informed of their approach. Such information would have induced me to postpone the attack. After this battle of Seven Pines-or Fair Oaks, as the Northern people prefer then the President should give the order. I have also the written testimony of Colonel Archer Anderson, then of General Holmes's staff, that he brought that number into General Lee's army. men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two
orps, were on and above the railroad, and Heintzelman's and Keyes's below it, and on the Williamsburg road. The last two, af upon my first design — that of assailing Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps as soon as, by advancing, they should sufficiently at might cross the Chickahominy to assist Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps; or, if none came, he was to fall upon the right fld drove them back to the main position of the first line of Keyes's corps-Casey's division. It occupied a line of rifle-pits's position, bore a prominent part in the last contest. Keyes's corps, united in this second position, was assailed with ps at Fair Oaks was six miles from those of Heintzelman and Keyes, which were near Bottom's Bridge; but the Confederate forcelthough his statement shows clearly that all his troops and Keyes's Kearney's division; Hooker's was not engaged. that foughing ranking officer, he could have united Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps to his own, and attacked the Confederates both in f
hickahominy, by the road to the Grape-vine Ford. A few minutes after this, a battery, at the point where this infantry had disappeared, opened its fire upon the head of the Confederate column. A regiment sent against it was received with a volley of musketry, as well as canister, and recoiled. The leading brigade, commanded by Colonel Law, then advanced, and so much strength was developed by the enemy, that General Smith formed his other brigades and brought them into battle on the left of Law's. An obstinate contest began, and was maintained on equal terms; although the Confederates engaged superior numbers in a position of their own choosing. I had passed the railroad some little distance with Hood's brigade, when the action commenced, and stopped to see its termination. But, being confident that the Federal troops opposing ours were those whose camps I had just seen, and therefore not more than a brigade, I did not doubt that General Smith was quite strong enough to cope w
J. R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 5
opposing General Banks, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, still under my direction. The President had placed Brigadier-General J. R. Anderson, with nine thousand men, in observation of General McDowell, who was at Fredericksburg with forty-two thousar and General Lee at eighteen thousand a month before, was then reduced to nine thousand by detachments to Branch and J. R. Anderson. On leaving the Rapidan, I had requested Generals Jackson and Ewell to send their letters to me through the Adjun the 27th, Branch's brigade was attacked by Porter's corps, and suffered severely in the encounter. It was united with Anderson's on the same day, however, at the point designated for their junction. There a division was formed of these troops, toGeneral A. P. Hill, just promoted, was assigned. In the afternoon a party of cavalry left near Fredericksburg by General Anderson, to observe McDowell's movements, reported that his troops were marching southward. As the expediency of the junct
enemy until the 26th of June, because he was employed, from the 1st until then, in forming a great army, by bringing, to that which I had commanded, fifteen thousand General Holmes told me in General Lee's presence, just before the fight began on the 31st, that he had that force ready to join me when the President should give the order. I have also the written testimony of Colonel Archer Anderson, then of General Holmes's staff, that he brought that number into General Lee's army. men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, which the victories of Cross Keys and Port Republic had rendered disposable.
to be followed, at two o'clock next morning, by G. W. Smith's, which was to keep the New Kent road. The baggage was to move next, in rear of which D. H. Hill's and Longstreet's divisions were to march. This order of march was based on the idea that a part of the Federal army might pass us by the river. About four o'clock P. M., the cavalry rear-guard, on the Yorktown road, was driven in, and rapidly followed by the enemy. Brigadier-General McLaws was sent with the two brigades nearest, Kershaw's and Semmes's, to support the rear-guard. He met the enemy near and beyond Fort Magruder, made his dispositions with prompt skill and courage, and quickly drove the Federal troops from the field, taking a piece of artillery. At sunset a rearguard of two brigades of Longstreet's division-Anderson's and Pryor's, commanded by General Anderson-occupied Fort Magruder and four of the little redoubts on its right, and two of those on the left. At daybreak on the 5th, Smith's division and th
Wilcox's and A. P. Hill's brigades were sent to the assistance of the troops engaged, and, as the Federal force on the field continued to increase, Pickett's and Colston's brigades also reenforced ours. At noon the fighting was reported by Longstreet and Stuart to be so sharp, that D. H. Hill's division, which had marched seveground — the southeastern part of that in which Williamsburg stands. The contest was just leaving the wood and entering the open ground when I first saw it. Here Colston's brigade joined the Confederate, and Kearney's division the Federal troops engaged. But in the open ground the Confederates were more rapidly successful than inoon, being reinforced apparently, the Federals (several brigades) assumed the offensive, and attacked him. In the mean time General Hill had sent two regiments of Colston's brigade to him. Although largely outnumbered, Pickett met this attack with great resolution, and after a brisk but short action repulsed the enemy, who disappea
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12