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de of the harbor, and it was the only artillery garrison on that side. Colonel Dunovant's infantry regiment was in the rear of the fort as a supporting force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention of the artillery garrison on the Hilton Head side, which comprised the German Artillery batallion, Colonel John A. Wagener, from Charleston; Company A, Captain D. Werner, Lieutenants D. Leseman, G. Linstedt, F. W. Wagener; Company B, Captain H. Harms, Lieutenants F. Melchers, B. Meyerhoff (killed), H. Klatte; who as bravely shared the honors and sacrifices of that day. In 1871 General John A. Wagener was elected Mayor of Charleston by a very complimentary vote. The Federal fleet of eighteen ships, carrying 200 guns, sailed around an eliptical course, between the shore batteries, delivering their broadsides with terrible effect against the Bay Point and Hilton Head forts.
L. C. Nowell (search for this): chapter 1.13
y, 4 guns, two sections, four guns, 1st regiment, United States regulars, three howitzers, manned by sailors, eleven guns. It is safe to estimate the total force at 4,000 men. The Confederate force was, by actual count, 405 men for duty, under the command of Colonel W. S. Walker, who earned the sobriquet of Live Oak in this fight, and was subsequently promoted brigadier general. The Charleston Light Dragoons, dismounted as infantry, Captain B. H. Rutledge; Lieutenants R. H. Colcock, L. C. Nowell, James W. O'Hear; Rutledge Mounted Riflemen (on foot), Captain W. L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.13
ar the section of artillery, he said, Go to the rear of that battery, file to the left and charge! I obeyed orders—all but the charging! On the right of the battery I looked around and found Lieutenant Reid and eight men. How the cannon shot tore down that hill and up that road. I could see where the 55th had charged and the dead lying there. Wagner always seemed to me the most terrible of our battles, but the musketry at Honey Hill! ( Georgians, under Willis, Edwards, Wilson, Cook and Jackson, and 3d South Carolina cavalry, as infantry, under Major John Jenkins responsible), was something fearful. The rebel yell was more prominent (artillery, cavalry and infantry, all responsible) than ever I heard it! Good management of the enemy. It is only fair to say that the Confederate management seems to have been excellent from first to last. The energy which brought a force from Western Georgia to the coast of Carolina so opportunely that it got in position only ten minutes bef
Maxcy Gregg (search for this): chapter 1.13
he personal friendship thus begun lasted uninterruptedly until Captain Earle's recent lamented death. The company known during the war as Earle's Battery was organized in August, 1861, by (Rev.) W. H. Campbell as captain, for service in Colonel Maxcy Gregg's infantry regiment. It soon attracted a large membership, and the lieutenants were: G. W. Holtzclaw, first; W. E. Earle, second; James Furman, third. There being need for artillerists, Colonel Gregg consented to release the command; in Colonel Gregg consented to release the command; in numbers it was large enough for two companies. Captain W. H. Campbell was promoted major, and Lieutenants Holtzclaw and Earle were made captains. Captain Earle's company as a compliment was named for Dr. James C. Furman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Greenville city. Its three officers were Lieutenants James Furman, a son of Dr. Furman; E. H. Graham, Jr., S. S. Kirby (Citadel, 1860), and Anderson. (In United States War Records and other war publications Earle's Battery is not
ines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four guns. Lampkin's (Va.) Light Battery, four pieces. Major Morgan, with two companies of cavalry. Captain Izard's company, of the 11th regiment, infantry. Captain Joseph Blythe Allston's company, of Abney battalion of sharpshooters. Charleston was well represented at Pocotaligo, a battle of most desperate character in attack and defence! for a part of the day the field pieces were engaged at the short range of from sixty to eighty yards; the odds were ten to one, but the enemy finally abandoned the field, and retreated to their water base, protected by gunboats. The Confederate casualties were 145-36 per cent. of the force engaged—in killed and wounded; the Federal losses are believed t
A. W. Wilson (search for this): chapter 1.13
I did. Arriving near the section of artillery, he said, Go to the rear of that battery, file to the left and charge! I obeyed orders—all but the charging! On the right of the battery I looked around and found Lieutenant Reid and eight men. How the cannon shot tore down that hill and up that road. I could see where the 55th had charged and the dead lying there. Wagner always seemed to me the most terrible of our battles, but the musketry at Honey Hill! ( Georgians, under Willis, Edwards, Wilson, Cook and Jackson, and 3d South Carolina cavalry, as infantry, under Major John Jenkins responsible), was something fearful. The rebel yell was more prominent (artillery, cavalry and infantry, all responsible) than ever I heard it! Good management of the enemy. It is only fair to say that the Confederate management seems to have been excellent from first to last. The energy which brought a force from Western Georgia to the coast of Carolina so opportunely that it got in position onl
William A. Courtenay (search for this): chapter 1.13
eir management of the Fight—Splendid discipline of the infantry, cavalry and Artillery forces engaged. [Reference may be made to preceding articles by Hon. William A. Courtenay, ante pp. 52 and 62. This was received from the accomplished writer since they were printed although it preceded them in the date of original publication. Whilst the articles are mutually illustrative they are not affected in their value by being printed as they are in this volume. Major Courtenay writes as to the artillery heroes of the Battle of Honey Hill: It was just wonderful what the boys did—Why, a rabbit could not have crossed the road. —Ed.] It is remarkable enoug which the loyalty of the armies to the flag and the forbearance of the people in their homes for the sake of The Cause have forbid all reference to or mention! Lee wore the gray! Since then 'Tis right's and honor's hue! He honored it, that man of men, And wrapped it round the true. Wm. A. Courtenay. Innisfallen, October,
Grayson Zealy (search for this): chapter 1.13
each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familiar with the
B. Meyerhoff (search for this): chapter 1.13
egiment was in the rear of the fort as a supporting force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention of the artillery garrison on the Hilton Head side, which comprised the German Artillery batallion, Colonel John A. Wagener, from Charleston; Company A, Captain D. Werner, Lieutenants D. Leseman, G. Linstedt, F. W. Wagener; Company B, Captain H. Harms, Lieutenants F. Melchers, B. Meyerhoff (killed), H. Klatte; who as bravely shared the honors and sacrifices of that day. In 1871 General John A. Wagener was elected Mayor of Charleston by a very complimentary vote. The Federal fleet of eighteen ships, carrying 200 guns, sailed around an eliptical course, between the shore batteries, delivering their broadsides with terrible effect against the Bay Point and Hilton Head forts. It was a day of disaster to the Confederate arms; a most unequal combat, but the Beaufort and Germa
A. Victor Kanapaux (search for this): chapter 1.13
pulation has been uniformly public-spirited and devoted to the best interests of city and State. The following were officers in 1861: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants M. P. O'Connor, L. F. LeBleux, G. W. Aimar, A. Victor Kanapaux. By assignment to special duties and other causes, changes occurred during the war, and at the date of the Honey Hill battle (1864) the following were commissioned officers: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants, senior first, C. J. Zealy; junior first, A. Victor Kanapaux; second, T. W. Bolger. Two guns and thirty-six men, under Lieutenant Zealy, were detached from Bee's Creek Battery and sent to Honey Hill. No passing commendation does justice to that meritorious officer, Lieutenant Zealy, whose career in the war was marked by devotion to the cause and a cheerful and most efficient discharge of duty. If he had done no more than serve his guns in the desperate fight down the road in the morning fight near Bolan Church he would be entitled to the hi
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