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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Washington. Now let us see, of both sides, who were interested in this first campaign against Richmond; these extracts are from official dispatches. General Scott to McClellan, July 18: McDowell yesterday drove the enemy beyond Fairfax Courthouse. He will attack the entrenched camp, Manassas Junction, today. Beaten there the enemy may retreat both upon Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley. I may reinforce him (Patterson) to enable you to bay Johnston. Secretary Cameron to Governor Curtin, July 18: The Pennsylvania troops were expected to have joined the forces going into battle this week. I trust there will be no delay to prevent them sharing the honors of the expected battle General Scott to McClellan, July 21, A. M: Johnston has amused Patterson and reinforced Beauregard. McDowell this morning forcing the passage of Bull Run. In two hours he will turn the Manassas Junction and storm it to-day with superior force. General Scott to the commanding
Thornton A. Washington (search for this): chapter 1.30
en killed, and that his brother, Lincoln's Secretary of War, had sent a friend, one Arnold Harris, a lobby member about Washington, to ask for his body. As he did not come under a flag of truce, General Johnston ordered him into custody and sent him to Richmond. The Republican secretary chose to ignore the existence of our authority and the rank and position of our officers by sending a verbal message and without a flag, just as the Ministers of King George were wont to act towards General Washington and the Continental Congress during the first revolution, and therefrom our officers chose to send the aforesaid Mr. Harris to prison. I have just heard that five more of Ellsworth's Zouaves—Old Abe's pet lambs—were captured to-day in the woods near Centreville, one of whom was Colonel Farnham, the successor of Ellsworth. He had been wounded and the other remained behind to take care of him. While on a visit yesterday to the Seventh Regiment I had the satisfaction of examining the
James Lawson Kemper (search for this): chapter 1.30
I never felt before the words of Holy writ, as terrible as an enemy with banners. The artillery companies did good service also. Those engaged were the New Orleans Washington Artillery, Latham's Battery from Lynchburg, Imboden's from Staunton, Kemper's from Alexandria, Thomas's from Richmond, Pendleton's from Lexington, Rogers's from Leesburg, and the Wise Artillery, Captain Arburtus. The Washington Artillery and Latham's Battery and Kemper's were in position to do most, but all his companieKemper's were in position to do most, but all his companies manoeuvred well and delivered their fires with great effect. I do not believe that I have informed you in any of my letters that Colonel Cameron, of one of the Pennsylvania regiments, had been killed, and that his brother, Lincoln's Secretary of War, had sent a friend, one Arnold Harris, a lobby member about Washington, to ask for his body. As he did not come under a flag of truce, General Johnston ordered him into custody and sent him to Richmond. The Republican secretary chose to igno
Theophilus H. Holmes (search for this): chapter 1.30
back about the camps, witnessing the drilling of troops and seeing everything that was to be seen about a large army. General Winfield Scott was too old to command, hence General McDowell was in charge of the United States troops on the 21st with the following brigadiers under him: Generals Burnside, Porter, Wilcox, Franklin, Howard, Sherman, Keys, Schenck, Richardson, Blenkers, and Runyon, while General Beauregard had under him Generals Bonham, D. R. Jones, Longstreet, Hampton, Ewell, and Holmes. General Joseph E. Johnston, who was in charge of the Army of the Shenandoah, reinforced Beauregrrd on the 21st, after a forced march from the Valley of Virginia, his brigadiers being T. J. Jackson, Barnard E. Bee, and E. K. Smith. The twelve companies of cavalry were commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. In examining my file of papers, the Louisville Daily Courier, I find the following letters in the evening edition of August 5, 1861. The first is copied from the Atlanta (Ga.) Confeder
Philip Sheridan (search for this): chapter 1.30
sitation, he stooped down and gently lifted him upon his back and bore him away to a place of safety. This was Lieutenant P. T. Oliver, a prosperous merchant and a most excellent citizen of the city of Athens. Our soldiers never resorted to such barbarous treatment of men as the water torture, practiced by the United States troops in the war in the Philippines. Nor did we burn houses down over the heads of women and children (as I witnessed in the Valley of Virginia), by the order of General Sheridan, and approved by the United States Government at Washington. Now let us see, of both sides, who were interested in this first campaign against Richmond; these extracts are from official dispatches. General Scott to McClellan, July 18: McDowell yesterday drove the enemy beyond Fairfax Courthouse. He will attack the entrenched camp, Manassas Junction, today. Beaten there the enemy may retreat both upon Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley. I may reinforce him (Patterson) to ena
rris to prison. I have just heard that five more of Ellsworth's Zouaves—Old Abe's pet lambs—were captured to-day in the woods near Centreville, one of whom was Colonel Farnham, the successor of Ellsworth. He had been wounded and the other remained behind to take care of him. While on a visit yesterday to the Seventh Regiment I had the satisfaction of examining their flag. It has fourteen bullet holes in it and the flag staff was struck in four places. After Colonel Bartow's fall Lieutenant Paxton, of Virginia, asked leave, the color-bearer being wounded, to carry the flag. His request was granted, and be and W. L. Norman, one of the color guards of DeKalb county, were the first to place it upon the captured battery. There is another incident which deserves public mention, and which shows of what stuff the Georgia boys are made. William DeJarnette, of the Rome Light Guard, having been slightly wounded and left behind, concealed himself in the bushes. The Second Rhode Island
f cavalry were commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. In examining my file of papers, the Louisville Daily Courier, I find the following letters in the evening edition of August 5, 1861. The first is copied from the Atlanta (Ga.) Confederacy. It reads as follows: The battle was a decided success, and was fought with distinguished gallantry by all our troops who participated in it. It is but just to say, however, that the Fourth Alabama Regiment, Colonel Jones, the Seventh Georgia, Colonel Gartrell, and the Eighth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner, both under Acting-Brigadier Bartow; the Fourth South Carolina, Colonel Sloane; Hampton's Legion, Colonel Hampton; the Sixth North Carolina, Colonel Fisher, and the Eleventh and Seventh Virginia did the hardest fighting, suffered most, and bore the brunt of the battle. Colonel Kershaw's and Colonel Cash (South Carolina) regiments came into action late, but did most effective service in the pursuit, which continued nearly to Centrevill
rmy. General Winfield Scott was too old to command, hence General McDowell was in charge of the United States troops on the 21st with the following brigadiers under him: Generals Burnside, Porter, Wilcox, Franklin, Howard, Sherman, Keys, Schenck, Richardson, Blenkers, and Runyon, while General Beauregard had under him Generals Bonham, D. R. Jones, Longstreet, Hampton, Ewell, and Holmes. General Joseph E. Johnston, who was in charge of the Army of the Shenandoah, reinforced Beauregrrd on the 21st, after a forced march from the Valley of Virginia, his brigadiers being T. J. Jackson, Barnard E. Bee, and E. K. Smith. The twelve companies of cavalry were commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. In examining my file of papers, the Louisville Daily Courier, I find the following letters in the evening edition of August 5, 1861. The first is copied from the Atlanta (Ga.) Confederacy. It reads as follows: The battle was a decided success, and was fought with distinguished gallantry by all
August 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.30
rals Bonham, D. R. Jones, Longstreet, Hampton, Ewell, and Holmes. General Joseph E. Johnston, who was in charge of the Army of the Shenandoah, reinforced Beauregrrd on the 21st, after a forced march from the Valley of Virginia, his brigadiers being T. J. Jackson, Barnard E. Bee, and E. K. Smith. The twelve companies of cavalry were commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. In examining my file of papers, the Louisville Daily Courier, I find the following letters in the evening edition of August 5, 1861. The first is copied from the Atlanta (Ga.) Confederacy. It reads as follows: The battle was a decided success, and was fought with distinguished gallantry by all our troops who participated in it. It is but just to say, however, that the Fourth Alabama Regiment, Colonel Jones, the Seventh Georgia, Colonel Gartrell, and the Eighth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner, both under Acting-Brigadier Bartow; the Fourth South Carolina, Colonel Sloane; Hampton's Legion, Colonel Hampton; the
August 10th, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 1.30
The First Manassas. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, August 10, 1902.] A man who was there tells about the great skedaddle. discipline of our troops. The lack of it was most Conspicuous—a writer who visited Beauregard's Camp when a boy recalls the great battle. Was there ever a more humiliating scene enacted in this country of ours than that as shown by the demoralized and fleeing United States troops at the first battle of Manassas? It has been some consolation to us old Confederates who have suffered so long and patiently since the close of the Civil war to know that the army of General McDowell, on the 21st day of July, 1861, composed of several thousand old regulars and 25,000 volunteers, were badly whipped by the Southern troops, who numbered not over 21,000, and of that number only about 16,000 were actually engaged. They had every advantage of us in means, ammunition, provisions, transportation, etc. Our regiments were made up of all grades and conditions of
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