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nd we are here waiting for orders. The telegraph has caught the general infection, and after getting within eight miles or us has stopped, waiting for insulators. The late Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer. From the Philadelphia Press, of the 21st inst., we extract the following: Gen. Zollicoffer was well known to the public as a politician and editor. He was born in Mewry county, Tenn., on the 19th of May, 1812. He was a printer by trade, and when quite a young man he published a paper some trouble, especially if supported by raids upon our coast. It still looks as though Texas might be a theatre of war within a twelvemonth or less. From the Potomac — a Federal Transport done for. The Fredericksburg Herald, of the 21st inst., says: We have a report that a large transport ship attempted to pass the battery at Cockpit Point, on the Potomac, on Friday, but was brought to by a well-directed fire. The vessel is reported to have been struck — how often we do not k
January 20th (search for this): article 16
ced — death of Gen. Zollicoffer. Cincinnati, Jan. 20. --A combined attach was made to-day on Gen. er particulars of Saturday's battle. Cincinnati, Jan. 20. --The Lexington, Ky., correspondent of the C a Brilliant victory at Somerset, Ky. Cincinnati Jan. 20. --A battle was fought at Somerset, Ky., on S— the Federal victory confirmed. Louisville, Jan. 20. --General Thomas telegraphs to headquarters of the losses on either side. Louisville, Jan. 20. --The recent fight took place on Sunday, ins from a grand reconnaissance to Columbus. Cairo, Jan. 20. --(Special dispatch to the Chicago Journal.)federates Evacuating their position. Washington, Jan. 20. --Information has been received from partiesonfirmed report--Hon. James Guthrie. Washington, Jan. 20. --The report that General Wool had sent a nory. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by L
from Missouri.&c. &c. &c. From the latest Northern and Southern papers which have been received we make up the following interesting summary of news. Although the news of our defeat in Kentucky lacks official confirmation, still the very reliable information which was received yesterday at the War Department leaves very little doubt that we have suffered a severe reverse in that quarter: Advance of the Federals--Paris and Danville in danger. From the Memphis Avalanche, of the 20th inst., we take the following: It appears to be generally believed, from all the indications, that the long-threatened advance of the Federals is now in progress. A gentleman who reached this city, in the late train last night, states that the Federals, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danvi
January 17th (search for this): article 16
bserver. Being elected State Printer, he held that office till 1842, when he removed to Nashville, where for some time he was editor of an old-line whig newspaper of that city, called the Banner, using his position as a stepping stone to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached this city last night to the effect that, yesterday, a large body of rebels, numbering about 5,000 men, in command of Jeff Thompson, advanced upon a Federal detachment of 300 troops, under Col. Mills, at a distance of about twenty-three miles from Ironton, and gave them battle. A desperate conflict ensued, resulting in the loss of many killed and wounded on both sides. The Federals, overpowered by numbers, had, at latest acc
January 15th (search for this): article 16
land river, and ninety miles east of Frankfort, the capital of the State. Official dispatches.--the Feeling in Washington. Washington. Jan. 21. --The Government has received dispatches fully confirming the intelligence from Kentucky. The facts reported in the press dispatches are substantially correct. The news causes intense delight here. The position of the Federal troops. The position of the troops at Somerset, is thus described in a letter from there, dated January 15, which we clip from the Philadelphia Press, of the 21st. The status here is simply this: Crittenden having taken the command of the troops at Mill Spring, while Zollicoffer has gone to Nashville, remains with the bulk of his 12,000 men, entrenched, and defended by 11 pieces of field artillery, and some 20 of the cannon manufactured in the Confederacy, and warranted to burst on the third discharge. His right flank is protected by the river, his left by White Oak Creek, (a stream with h
, Tenn., on the 19th of May, 1812. He was a printer by trade, and when quite a young man he published a paper at Paris, in Tennessee, and subsequently was proprietor of the Columbian Observer. Being elected State Printer, he held that office till 1842, when he removed to Nashville, where for some time he was editor of an old-line whig newspaper of that city, called the Banner, using his position as a stepping stone to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached this city last night to the effect that, yesterday, a large body of rebels, numbering about 5,000 men, in command of Jeff Thompson, advanced upon a Federal detachment of 300 troops, under Col. Mills, at a distance of about twenty-three miles from Ironton
waiting for insulators. The late Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer. From the Philadelphia Press, of the 21st inst., we extract the following: Gen. Zollicoffer was well known to the public as a politician and editor. He was born in Mewry county, Tenn., on the 19th of May, 1812. He was a printer by trade, and when quite a young man he published a paper at Paris, in Tennessee, and subsequently was proprietor of the Columbian Observer. Being elected State Printer, he held that office till 1842, when he removed to Nashville, where for some time he was editor of an old-line whig newspaper of that city, called the Banner, using his position as a stepping stone to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached thi
May 19th, 1812 AD (search for this): article 16
es this side of Columbia, or was at last accounts, waiting till a creek runs down, and we are here waiting for orders. The telegraph has caught the general infection, and after getting within eight miles or us has stopped, waiting for insulators. The late Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer. From the Philadelphia Press, of the 21st inst., we extract the following: Gen. Zollicoffer was well known to the public as a politician and editor. He was born in Mewry county, Tenn., on the 19th of May, 1812. He was a printer by trade, and when quite a young man he published a paper at Paris, in Tennessee, and subsequently was proprietor of the Columbian Observer. Being elected State Printer, he held that office till 1842, when he removed to Nashville, where for some time he was editor of an old-line whig newspaper of that city, called the Banner, using his position as a stepping stone to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for thr
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