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Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Robert Browning).

Found 100 total hits in 30 results.

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Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 538
Of vestures, making hair a wild-beast matting. Winter, too, if one told of it -- bird-slaying -- Such as, unbearable, Idaian snow brought -- Or heat, when waveless, on its noontide couches Without a wind, the sea would slumber falling -- Why must one mourn these? O'er and gone is labour: O'er and gone is it, even to those dead ones, So that no more again they mind uprising. Why must we tell in numbers those deprived ones, And the live man be vexed with fate's fresh outbreak? Rather, I bid full farewell to misfortunes! For us, the left from out the Argeian army, The gain beats, nor does sorrow counterbalance. So that 't is fitly boasted of, this sunlight, By us, o'er sea and land the aery flyers, "Troia at last taking, the band of Argives Hang up such trophies to the gods of Hellas Within their domes -- new glory to grow ancient!" Such things men having heard must praise the city And army-leaders: and the grace which wrought them -- Of Zeus, shall honoured be. Thou hast my whole word.
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 538
Of vestures, making hair a wild-beast matting. Winter, too, if one told of it -- bird-slaying -- Such as, unbearable, Idaian snow brought -- Or heat, when waveless, on its noontide couches Without a wind, the sea would slumber falling -- Why must one mourn these? O'er and gone is labour: O'er and gone is it, even to those dead ones, So that no more again they mind uprising. Why must we tell in numbers those deprived ones, And the live man be vexed with fate's fresh outbreak? Rather, I bid full farewell to misfortunes! For us, the left from out the Argeian army, The gain beats, nor does sorrow counterbalance. So that 't is fitly boasted of, this sunlight, By us, o'er sea and land the aery flyers, "Troia at last taking, the band of Argives Hang up such trophies to the gods of Hellas Within their domes -- new glory to grow ancient!" Such things men having heard must praise the city And army-leaders: and the grace which wrought them -- Of Zeus, shall honoured be. Thou hast my whole word.
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 583
in the old -- "to learn well." But these things most the house and Klutaimnestra Concern, 't is likely: while they make me rich, too. KLUTAIMNESTRA. I shouted long ago, indeed, for joyance, When came that first night-messenger of fire Proclaiming Ilion's capture and dispersion. And someone, girding me, said, "Through fire-bearers Persuaded -- Troia to be sacked now, thinkest? Truly, the woman's way, -- high to lift heart up! " By such words I was made seem wit-bewildered: Yet still I sacrificedTroia to be sacked now, thinkest? Truly, the woman's way, -- high to lift heart up! " By such words I was made seem wit-bewildered: Yet still I sacrificed; and, -- female-song with, -- A shout one man and other, through the city, Set up, congratulating in the gods' seats, Soothing the incense-eating flame right fragrant. And now, what's more, indeed, why need'st thou tell me? I of the king himself shall learn the whole word: And, -- as may best be, -- I my revered husband Shall hasten, as he comes back, to receive: for -- What's to a wife sweeter to see than this light (Her husband, by the god saved, back from warfare) So as to open gates? This
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 613
From clear interpreters -- a speech most seemly. But speak thou, herald! Meneleos I ask of: If he, returning, back in safety also Will come with you -- this land's beloved chieftain? HERALD. There's no way I might say things false and pleasant For friends to reap the fruits of through a long time. CHOROS. How then if, speaking good, things true thou chance on? HERALD. For not well-hidden things become they, sundered. The man has vanished from the Achaic army, He and his ship too. I announce no falsehood. CHOROS. Whether forth-putting openly from Ilion, Or did storm -- wide woe -- snatch him from the army? HERALD. Like topping bowman, thou hast touched the target, And a long sorrow hast succinctly spoken. CHOROS. Whether, then, of him, as a live or dead man Was the report by other sailors bruited? HERALD. Nobody knows so as to tell out clearly Excepting Helios who sustains earth's nature. CHOROS. How say'st thou then, did storm the naval army Attack and end, by the celestials' anger?
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 699
To Ilion Wrath, fulfilling her intent, This marriage-care -- the rightly named so -- sent: In after-time, for the tables' abuse And that of the hearth-partaker Zeus, Bringing to punishment Those who honoured with noisy throat The honour of the bride, the hymenseal note Which did the kinsfolk then to singing urge. But, learning a new hymn for that which was, The ancient city of Priamos Groans probably a great and general dirge, Denominating Paris "The man that miserably marries": -- She who, all the while before, A life, that was a general dirge For citizens' unhappy slaughter, bore.
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 782
Approach then, my monarch, of Troia the sacker, of Atreus the son! How ought I address thee, how ought I revere thee, -- nor yet overhitting Nor yet underbending the grace that is fitting? Many of mortals hasten to honour the seeming-to-be -- Passing by justice: and, with the ill-faring, to groan as he groans all are free. But no bite of the sorrow their liver has reached to: They say with the joyful, -- one outside on each, too, As they force to a smile smileless faces. But whoever is good at distinguishing races In sheep of his flock -- it is not for the eyes Of a man to escape such a shepherd's surprise, As they seem, from a well-wishing mind, In watery friendship to fawn and be kind. Thou to me, then, indeed, sending an army for Helena's sake, (I will not conceal it) wast -- oh, by no help of the Muses! -- depicted Not well of thy midriff the rudder directing. -- convicted Of bringing a boldness they did not desire to the men with existence at stake. But now -- from no outside o
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 810
AGAMEMNON. First, indeed, Argos, and the gods, the local, 'T is right addressing -- those with me the partners In this return and right things done the city Of Priamos: gods who, from no tongue hearing The rights o' the cause, for Ilion's fate man-slaught'rous Into the bloody vase, not oscillating, Put the vote-pebbles, while, o' the rival vessel, Hope rose up to the lip-edge: filled it was not. By smoke the captured city is still conspicuous: Até's burnt offerings live: and, dying with them, The ash sends forth the fulsome blasts of riches. Of these things, to the gods grace many-mindful 'T is right I render, since both nets outrageous We built them round with, and, for sake of woman, It did the city to dust -- the Argeian monster, The horse's nestling, the shield-bearing people That made a leap, at setting of the Pleiads, And, vaulting o'er the tower, the raw-flesh-feeding Lion licked up his fill of blood tyrannic. I to the gods indeed prolonged this preface; But -- as for thy
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 855
rgeians here, my worships! I shall not shame me, consort-loving manners To tell before you: for in time there dies off The diffidence from people. Not from others Learning, I of myself will tell the hard life I bore so long as this man was 'neath Ilion. First: for a woman, from the male divided, To sit at home alone, is monstrous evil -- Hearing the many rumours back-revenging: And for now This to come, now That bring after Woe, and still worse woe, bawling in the household! And truly, if so maorce! From this cause, sure, the boy stands not beside me -- Possessor of our troth-plights, thine and mine too -- As ought Orestes: be not thou astonished! For, him brings up our well-disposed guest-captive Strophios the Phokian -- ills that told on both sides To me predicting -- both of thee 'neath Ilion The danger, and if anarchy's mob-uproar Should overthrow thy council; since 't is born with Mortals, -- whoe'er has fallen, the more to kick him. Such an excuse, I think, no cunning carries!
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 887
rned thee Seeing, that filled more than their fellow-sleep-time. Now, all this having suffered, from soul grief-free I would style this man here the dog o' the stables, The saviour forestay of the ship, the high roof's Ground-prop, son sole-begotten to his father, -- Ay, land appearing to the sailors past hope, Loveliest day to see after a tempest, To the wayfaring-one athirst a well-spring, -- The joy, in short, of 'scaping all that 's -- fatal! I judge him worth addresses such as these are -- Envy stand off! -- for many those old evils We underwent. And now, to me -- dear headship! -- Dismount thou from this car, not earthward setting The foot of thine, O king, that's Ilion's spoiler! Slave-maids, why tarry? -- whose the task allotted To strew the soil o' the road with carpet-spreadings. Immediately be purple-strewn the pathway, So that to home unhoped may lead him -- Justice! As for the rest, care shall -- by no sleep conquered -- Dispose things -- justly (gods to aid!) appointed.
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 975
CHOROS. Wherefore to me, this fear -- Groundedly stationed here Fronting my heart, the portent-watcher -- flits she? Wherefore should prophet-play The uncalled and unpaid lay, Nor -- having spat forth fear, like bad dreams -- sits she On the mind's throne beloved -- well-suasive Boldness? For time, since, by a throw of all the hands, The boat's stern-cables touched the sands, Has past from youth to oldness, -- When under Ilion rushed the ship-borne bands.
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