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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
ical condition (the main cause of my return); this still continues. I had expected the Convention to have adjourned before this time, but I could not have returned to Richmond ere this, for the reason mentioned. I am well aware that your whole time is occupied with public affairs, but if in the midst of your official duties and burdens you can snatch a moment for a line to me, it would afford me the utmost pleasure. Is this likely to be a general war of invasion, or are the stupids at Washington to attempt a scheme of blockade and border foray, starvation, &c., by cutting off commerce? I need not say that it will afford me the utmost pleasure to be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. M
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
chmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred muskets, altered to percussion, as a loan to the State of South Carolina, through Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Officer, South Carolina. The following letteSouth Carolina. The following letter from General R. E. Lee will be read with interest, as showing that at an early day he appreciated and sought to provide against the danger of the disorganization of the volunteer forces of the Confederacy: Coosawhatchie, South Carolina, December 26th, 1861. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: Governor — I
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
ehicle of communication of the enclosed resolutions of the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, in which your Excellency will perceive that your kindness to the citizens of Wilmington in thWilmington in their moment of danger is duly and highly appreciated. With the sincere assurance that your Excellency's kindness will always by us be remembered with gratitude, I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Wm. S. Ashe. Wilmington, N. C., September 17th, 1861. At a meeting of the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, the following proceeding was adopted: Wilmington, the following proceeding was adopted: Honorable Wm. S. Ashe having reported that he had procured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskets-- Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are letter of yesterday, enclosing resolutions adopted by the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, expressive of their thanks for the arms which it was in my power to furnish for their defence
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
great and eminent services to our noble, suffering and uncomplaining State, now afflicted by the direst calamities, and threatened with the most formidable dangers that can befall a gallant and virtuous people. God grant you, and all who labor in her cause, the success which such efforts justly merit. With sentiments of the highest regard, I remain, Governor, Very faithfully, your friend and servant, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General. headquarters first Kentucky brigade, Bowling Green, Kentucky, November 30th, 1861. Colonel — The muskets, I am informed, have reached Nashville. I am in receipt of your communication of November 12th, and am under the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmoc
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
860. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: My Dear Sir — I have caused a copy of youa letter received by him from the Governor of Virginia. I am also instructed by the General to say,t-break. I doubt very much the expediency of Virginia sending any troops to the western border, at any short time, an organized force in Northwestern Virginia, sufficient to meet a large body of tr organize a brigade for the defence of Southwestern Virginia, and the important line of the Virginible efforts to increase the military power of Virginia. The apprehension of a movement by the enemyhat he had procured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskd to his Excellency John Letcher. Governor of Virginia, for the promptness with which he has respondHenry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Office861. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: Governor — I have desired to call your at[5 more...]<
Joseph Mayo (search for this): chapter 6.39
and in the use of these arms promise to justify your kindness. I am engaged this evening with a part of my family, who have just arrived from the country, and will leave to-morrow morning. Under no other circumstances would I have failed to call upon you and thank you for the prompt and efficient manner in which you have always acted in support of my humble efforts to serve our cause, and for your present kindness in offering me the means to do so, where they are so much needed. Doctor Mayo informs me that you will leave for the salt works to-morrow morning, and as I may not meet you for a long time, allow me to express my high appreciation of your great and eminent services to our noble, suffering and uncomplaining State, now afflicted by the direst calamities, and threatened with the most formidable dangers that can befall a gallant and virtuous people. God grant you, and all who labor in her cause, the success which such efforts justly merit. With sentiments of the
Edmund Turner (search for this): chapter 6.39
ide, as far as possible, for the defence, not only of my own State, but of all the Confederate States, engaged as we are in a common cause for the maintenance of rights and institutions dear to us all. I return to the Committee my acknowledgments for their resolutions, and many thanks to you for the kind terms which you have employed in communicating them to me. I am, truly, John Letcher. Richmond, Va., October 9th, 1862. My Dear Governor — I have the honor to present to you Mr. Edmund Turner, of my staff, and to say that you will place me under the greatest of obligations by delivering to him the order for the arms which you were kind enough to offer me day before yesterday, and by informing him how and where they are to be obtained. Please let me have as many as you can spare. I shall thus be made by you doubly welcome to my new command, and in the use of these arms promise to justify your kindness. I am engaged this evening with a part of my family, who have jus
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 6.39
ed to make. I remain, most respectfully yours, &c., John Letcher. Hon. Geo. W. Summers, Charleston, Kanawha County, Va. The two following letters from President Davis are of interest: Richmond, June 7, 1861. Dear Sir — I have the honor to acknowledge ours of yesterday, covering the letter of General Floyd and its e form a part of it. Enclosed please find a copy of the letter this day addressed to General Floyd, and believe me to be, Very respectfully, yours, &c., Jefferson Davis. To His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia. Richmond, June 7th, 1861. General John B. Floyd: Dear Sir--Governor Letcher has sent me yours of ther than the best wishes for yourself personally, and for the success of the service entrusted to you. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully yours, Jefferson Davis. The letters which follow are interesting illustrations of what Virginia was enabled to do in assisting to arm the troops of other States as well as her
enant-General commanding the army, I send you the enclosed copy of a letter received by him from the Governor of Virginia. I am also instructed by the General to say, that as you have been authorized to delay proceeding to join your new post until the first of February next, you are, of course, at liberty to accept or to decline Governor Letcher's invitation to visit the encampment of cavalry, as you may think proper. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) E. D. Keys, Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Military Secretary to Lieutenant-General Scott. The following from Honorable George W. Summers, and the reply of Governor Letcher, are important: Kanawha Courthouse, May 3d, 1861. John Letcher, Esq., Governor, &c.: My Dear Sir — So far, the population on either side the Ohio remain quiet. Our former relation of good neighborhood continues. The boats in the Cincinnati trade from this Valley yet make their trips, but have had difficult
Charles Dimmock (search for this): chapter 6.39
e, Bowling Green, Kentucky, November 30th, 1861. Colonel — The muskets, I am informed, have reached Nashville. I am in receipt of your communication of November 12th, and am under the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor
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