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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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J. Bankhead Magruder (search for this): chapter 6.39
et you for a long time, allow me to express my high appreciation of your great and eminent services to our noble, suffering and uncomplaining State, now afflicted by the direst calamities, and threatened with the most formidable dangers that can befall a gallant and virtuous people. God grant you, and all who labor in her cause, the success which such efforts justly merit. With sentiments of the highest regard, I remain, Governor, Very faithfully, your friend and servant, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General. headquarters first Kentucky brigade, Bowling Green, Kentucky, November 30th, 1861. Colonel — The muskets, I am informed, have reached Nashville. I am in receipt of your communication of November 12th, and am under the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distr
enemy at the opening of the next campaign. On the plains of Manassas, for instance, the enemy will resume operations, after a year's preparation and a winter of repose, fresh vigorous and completely organized, while we shall be in the confusion and excitement of reorganizing ours. The disbanding and reorganizing an army in time of peace is attended with loss and expense. What must it be in time of active service in the presence of the enemy prepared to strike? I have thought that General McClellan is waiting to take the advantage which that opportunity will give him. What is then to stand between him and Richmond? I know of no way of ensuring the re-enlistment of our regiments, except by the passage of a law for drafting them for the war, unless they volunteer for that period. The great object of the Confederate States is to bring the war to a successful issue. Every consideration should yield to that; for without it we can hope to enjoy nothing that we possess, and nothing t
William S. Ashe (search for this): chapter 6.39
ill always by us be remembered with gratitude, I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Wm. S. Ashe. Wilmington, N. C., September 17th, 1861. At a meeting of the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, the following proceeding was adopted: Honorable Wm. S. Ashe having reported that he had procured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskets-- Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are eminently duesponded to the application for arms by this Committee. Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be handed to Mr. Ashe, with the request that he will communicate the same to Governor Letcher. S. D. Wallace, Secretary. Richmond, Va., September 21st, 1861. Honorable Wm. S. Ashe: Dear Sir — I have had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday, enclosing resolutions adopted by the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, expressive of their thanks for the arms which it wa
S. D. Wallace (search for this): chapter 6.39
ured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskets-- Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are eminently due and are hereby most earnestly tendered to his Excellency John Letcher. Governor of Virginia, for the promptness with which he has responded to the application for arms by this Committee. Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be handed to Mr. Ashe, with the request that he will communicate the same to Governor Letcher. S. D. Wallace, Secretary. Richmond, Va., September 21st, 1861. Honorable Wm. S. Ashe: Dear Sir — I have had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday, enclosing resolutions adopted by the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, expressive of their thanks for the arms which it was in my power to furnish for their defence. In the distribution of the arms, &c., at my disposal, it has afforded me pleasure to provide, as far as possible, for the defence, not only of my own State, but of al
C. G. Memminger (search for this): chapter 6.39
, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred muskets, altered to percussion, as a loan to the State of South Carolina, through Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Officer, South Carolina. The following letter from General R. E. Lee will be read with interest, as showing that at an early day he appreciated
S. B. Pickens (search for this): chapter 6.39
er the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred muskets, altered to percussion, as a loan to the State of South Carolina, through Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State
Henry Spannick (search for this): chapter 6.39
My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred muskets, altered to percussion, as a loan to the State of South Carolina, through Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Officer, South Carolina. The following letter from General R. E. Lee will be read with interest, as showing that at an early day he appreciated and sought to provide against the danger of the disorganization of the volunteer forces of the Confederacy: Coosawhatchie, South Carolina, December 26th, 1861. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: Governor — I have desired to call your atten
for drafting them for the war, unless they volunteer for that period. The great object of the Confederate States is to bring the war to a successful issue. Every consideration should yield to that; for without it we can hope to enjoy nothing that we possess, and nothing that we do possess will be worth enjoying without it. I have also wished to speak of one of our best officers. Colonel Carter L. Stevenson. He has been and still is in Western Virginia, acting as Adjutant-General of General Loring. He ought to be at the head of a regiment. He is a faithful, energetic officer, and at this time I should suppose not wanted in his present position. Cannot he get a Virginia regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel S. Bassett French as Lieutenant-Colonel, and be sent out here? I want troops badly, and want them for the war. I fear Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is very strong, and his fleet all-
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 6.39
h such efforts justly merit. With sentiments of the highest regard, I remain, Governor, Very faithfully, your friend and servant, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General. headquarters first Kentucky brigade, Bowling Green, Kentucky, November 30th, 1861. Colonel — The muskets, I am informed, have reached Nashville. I am in receipt of your communication of November 12th, and am under the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I
unties, volunteer companies, home guards, &c. Our mountains are full of rifles, and if invaded, we shall give a good account of ourselves. The question with us is, whether we are not better off, left to ourselves, than to have a small and inadequate force sent to us, which might merely serve as an excuse for an outbreak. What we need is guns in the hands of our own companies. Whether it might be well to have some troops in the interior, at long distance from the river — such a point as Grafton or Piedmont, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad--might be worthy of consideration. Troops in any of the counties on the rivers would most probably cut off every supply from below, both for the army and the resident population. I have ventured to throw out these suggestions, not formally, as to the commander-in-chief, but in the freedom of private friendship, knowing your anxiety to do your whole duty in this crisis, and your wish to obtain information from every part of the State.
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