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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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John B. Floyd (search for this): chapter 6.39
Richmond, June 7, 1861. Dear Sir — I have the honor to acknowledge ours of yesterday, covering the letter of General Floyd and its enclosure, to wit: three captains' commissions, which had been regularly issued by you. Permit me to express nd, if you can consistently do so, I would be glad that the companies in question should be left in that region until General Floyd can complete the organization of his brigade, and, if you please, that these companies should form a part of it. Enclosed please find a copy of the letter this day addressed to General Floyd, and believe me to be, Very respectfully, yours, &c., Jefferson Davis. To His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia. Richmond, June 7th, 1861. General John B. General John B. Floyd: Dear Sir--Governor Letcher has sent me yours of the 4th instant, covering the commissions of four captains, and a statement to the effect that those officers were duly commissioned and regularly in the service of the State of Virginia, and
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 6.39
to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost erough Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Officer, South Carolina. The following letter from General R. E. Lee will be read with interest, as showing that at an early day he appreciated and sought to provide against the danger of the disorganization of the volunteer feffected but little, and if he will leave his big floating guns, that sweep over the lowlands like a scythe, I hope he will not have everything his own way. With my best wishes, my dear Governor, for your health and happiness, and kind regards to all around you, I remain with high respect, truly and sincerely yours, R. E. Lee.
John Letcher (search for this): chapter 6.39
Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. The following letters are of interestction of autographs. Upon a request of Governor Letcher that Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, United Stays. New York, October 22, 1860. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: My Dear Sir, 1861. General John B. Floyd: Dear Sir--Governor Letcher has sent me yours of the 4th instant, hereby most earnestly tendered to his Excellency John Letcher. Governor of Virginia, for the prompt communicating them to me. I am, truly, John Letcher. Richmond, Va., October 9th, 1862. My good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred musth Carolina, December 26th, 1861. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: Governor — [9 more...]
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 6.39
nor Letcher that Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, United States Army, be allowed to come to Richmond to drill the Virginia cavalry then encamped at the Fair Grounds, General Scott wrote the following letters. General Hardee complied with the request, and drilled the cavalry several days. New York, October 22, 1860. His Excellency Johle Colonel Hardee will take pleasure in meeting the wishes of your Excellency. With great respect, I have the honor to remain, Your obedient servant, Winfield Scott. Headquarters of the army, New York, October 22, 186<*>. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Hardee, First United States Cavalry: Sir — By direction of the Lieutenan proper. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) E. D. Keys, Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Military Secretary to Lieutenant-General Scott. The following from Honorable George W. Summers, and the reply of Governor Letcher, are important: Kanawha Courthouse, May 3d, 1861. John Letc
o be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kind enough to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost exactly with the course you have advised me to pursue. He agrees with you that it would be impossible for us to raise a force at this time sufficiently strong to resist the large bodies of troops in the S
Carter L. Stevenson (search for this): chapter 6.39
I know of no way of ensuring the re-enlistment of our regiments, except by the passage of a law for drafting them for the war, unless they volunteer for that period. The great object of the Confederate States is to bring the war to a successful issue. Every consideration should yield to that; for without it we can hope to enjoy nothing that we possess, and nothing that we do possess will be worth enjoying without it. I have also wished to speak of one of our best officers. Colonel Carter L. Stevenson. He has been and still is in Western Virginia, acting as Adjutant-General of General Loring. He ought to be at the head of a regiment. He is a faithful, energetic officer, and at this time I should suppose not wanted in his present position. Cannot he get a Virginia regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel S. Bassett French as Lieutenant-Colonel, and be sent out here? I want troops badly, and want them for the war. I fear Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond,
George W. Summers (search for this): chapter 6.39
obedient servant, (Signed) E. D. Keys, Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Military Secretary to Lieutenant-General Scott. The following from Honorable George W. Summers, and the reply of Governor Letcher, are important: Kanawha Courthouse, May 3d, 1861. John Letcher, Esq., Governor, &c.: My Dear Sir — So far, ns, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kinm you upon the subject of your letter, and to receive any suggestions you may be pleased to make. I remain, most respectfully yours, &c., John Letcher. Hon. Geo. W. Summers, Charleston, Kanawha County, Va. The two following letters from President Davis are of interest: Richmond, June 7, 1861. Dear Sir — I have the<
W. G. Eason (search for this): chapter 6.39
for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I herewith send you a receipt of the Governor for the same. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. His Excellency Governor Letcher, present. Charleston, South Carolina, December 3d, 1861. Received from Governor Letcher, of the State of Virginia, five hundred muskets, altered to percussion, as a loan to the State of South Carolina, through Mr. Henry Spannick, as special agent for the State of Virginia. W. G. Eason, Assistant Ordnance Officer, South Carolina. The following letter from General R. E. Lee will be read with interest, as showing that at an early day he appreciated and sought to provide against the danger of the disorganization of the volunteer forces of the Confederacy: Coosawhatchie, South Carolina, December 26th, 1861. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: Governor — I have desired to call your attention to the necessity of making provision for replacing the V
S. Bassett French (search for this): chapter 6.39
as Adjutant-General of General Loring. He ought to be at the head of a regiment. He is a faithful, energetic officer, and at this time I should suppose not wanted in his present position. Cannot he get a Virginia regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel S. Bassett French as Lieutenant-Colonel, and be sent out here? I want troops badly, and want them for the war. I fear Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is very strong, and his fleet all-powerful in these waters. As yet he has effected but little, and if he will leave his big floating guns, that sweep over the lowlands like a scythe, I hope he will not have everything his own way. With my best wishes, my dear Governor, for your health and happiness, and kind regards to all around you, I remain with high respect, truly and sincerely yours, R. E. Lee.
W. J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 6.39
e addition to our collection of autographs. Upon a request of Governor Letcher that Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, United States Army, be allowed to come to Richmond to drill the Virginia cavalry then encamped at the Fair Grounds, General Scott wrote the following letters. General Hardee complied with the request, and drilled the cavalry several days. New York, October 22, 1860. His Excellencyr of Virginia: My Dear Sir — I have caused a copy of your letter to be forwarded to Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, who is, I think, still at West Point, though relieved from duty there. It is not comrvice whatever, not strictly within the line of his official duties, but I think it probable Colonel Hardee will take pleasure in meeting the wishes of your Excellency. With great respect, I hav servant, Winfield Scott. Headquarters of the army, New York, October 22, 186<*>. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Hardee, First United States Cavalry: Sir — By direction of the Lieutenant-General comma
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