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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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May 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 6.39
pids at Washington to attempt a scheme of blockade and border foray, starvation, &c., by cutting off commerce? I need not say that it will afford me the utmost pleasure to be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kind enough to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost exactly with the course you have
ies in question should be left in that region until General Floyd can complete the organization of his brigade, and, if you please, that these companies should form a part of it. Enclosed please find a copy of the letter this day addressed to General Floyd, and believe me to be, Very respectfully, yours, &c., Jefferson Davis. To His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia. Richmond, June 7th, 1861. General John B. Floyd: Dear Sir--Governor Letcher has sent me yours of the 4th instant, covering the commissions of four captains, and a statement to the effect that those officers were duly commissioned and regularly in the service of the State of Virginia, and could not therefore right-fully transfer their companies to another service. Please find enclosed a copy of my reply to him. Should he be pleased to transfer the companies to your brigade, the difficulty will thereby be removed, otherwise you will not fail to perceive they cannot be incorporated into the command
May 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 6.39
your new post until the first of February next, you are, of course, at liberty to accept or to decline Governor Letcher's invitation to visit the encampment of cavalry, as you may think proper. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) E. D. Keys, Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Military Secretary to Lieutenant-General Scott. The following from Honorable George W. Summers, and the reply of Governor Letcher, are important: Kanawha Courthouse, May 3d, 1861. John Letcher, Esq., Governor, &c.: My Dear Sir — So far, the population on either side the Ohio remain quiet. Our former relation of good neighborhood continues. The boats in the Cincinnati trade from this Valley yet make their trips, but have had difficulty in some instances in procuring freights, especially in the provision line. The people of Ohio profess to desire peace and commerce with us; but it is not to be denied that the public mind is in a sensitive condition, rendering
lockade and border foray, starvation, &c., by cutting off commerce? I need not say that it will afford me the utmost pleasure to be of any service to you in this part of the State, and I hope you will not hesitate to call upon me. Your communications, when necessary, shall be held as strictly confidential. My best respects for Mrs. L., if she is with you. With high esteem, Your obedient servant, Geo. W. Summers. Executive Department, May 10th, 1861. My Dear Sir — Your favor of May 3d has been received. Deeming it important that the suggestions you have been kind enough to make should be made known to General Lee, who has been entrusted with the defence of the State, I have taken the liberty of submitting your letter to him. General Lee concurs fully with you in the views you have presented, and the steps taken by him for the protection and defence of your section of the State coincide almost exactly with the course you have advised me to pursue. He agrees with you t
October 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6.39
bution of the arms, &c., at my disposal, it has afforded me pleasure to provide, as far as possible, for the defence, not only of my own State, but of all the Confederate States, engaged as we are in a common cause for the maintenance of rights and institutions dear to us all. I return to the Committee my acknowledgments for their resolutions, and many thanks to you for the kind terms which you have employed in communicating them to me. I am, truly, John Letcher. Richmond, Va., October 9th, 1862. My Dear Governor — I have the honor to present to you Mr. Edmund Turner, of my staff, and to say that you will place me under the greatest of obligations by delivering to him the order for the arms which you were kind enough to offer me day before yesterday, and by informing him how and where they are to be obtained. Please let me have as many as you can spare. I shall thus be made by you doubly welcome to my new command, and in the use of these arms promise to justify your k
February 1st (search for this): chapter 6.39
t respect, I have the honor to remain, Your obedient servant, Winfield Scott. Headquarters of the army, New York, October 22, 186<*>. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Hardee, First United States Cavalry: Sir — By direction of the Lieutenant-General commanding the army, I send you the enclosed copy of a letter received by him from the Governor of Virginia. I am also instructed by the General to say, that as you have been authorized to delay proceeding to join your new post until the first of February next, you are, of course, at liberty to accept or to decline Governor Letcher's invitation to visit the encampment of cavalry, as you may think proper. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) E. D. Keys, Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Military Secretary to Lieutenant-General Scott. The following from Honorable George W. Summers, and the reply of Governor Letcher, are important: Kanawha Courthouse, May 3d, 1861. John Letcher, Esq., Gove
June 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 6.39
ive any suggestions you may be pleased to make. I remain, most respectfully yours, &c., John Letcher. Hon. Geo. W. Summers, Charleston, Kanawha County, Va. The two following letters from President Davis are of interest: Richmond, June 7, 1861. Dear Sir — I have the honor to acknowledge ours of yesterday, covering the letter of General Floyd and its enclosure, to wit: three captains' commissions, which had been regularly issued by you. Permit me to express my regret, that in the ld form a part of it. Enclosed please find a copy of the letter this day addressed to General Floyd, and believe me to be, Very respectfully, yours, &c., Jefferson Davis. To His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia. Richmond, June 7th, 1861. General John B. Floyd: Dear Sir--Governor Letcher has sent me yours of the 4th instant, covering the commissions of four captains, and a statement to the effect that those officers were duly commissioned and regularly in the service of th
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