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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: the Mexican War. General Taylor occupies Corpus Christi. horsemanship of the Texans. Taylor moves to the Rio Grande. hostilities by the Mexicans. battle of Palo Alto. Resaca. volunteering. General Taylor's letter in regard to General Johnston. Asks him to join the army. he goes on horseback from Galveston and joins the army. his letters from point Isabel, detailing military operations. elected Colonel of first Texas Riflemen. pride in his Regiment. disbanded. essel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of action. The time required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palo Alto and Resaca. His wife and infant son were left at Galveston under the care of Colonel Love and his good wife. Leonard Groce, for many years General Johnston's friend, knowing his military ardor, promptly sent him a fine war-horse, which bore him nobly t
Point Isabel (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, General Taylor made a forward movement to Point Isabel, which commanded the mouth of the Rio Grandtened General Taylor's communications with Point Isabel, his base of supply. To reestablish his co General Taylor started on his return from Point Isabel, on May 7th, with 2,300 soldiers, and, on t8th, urging General Johnston to meet him at Point Isabel, and again, through their mutual friend, Th required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palonobly through the campaign. On the road to Point Isabel, General Johnston saw the tarantula for the The Texans were gathering in hot haste at Point Isabel to defend their border, and their organizatey may be allowed to tell their own story: Point Isabel, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancook: I suppose egiment to march. The troops are occupying Point Isabel, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande,ruly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I[2 more...]
Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
sbanded, father, and the men have gone home; and I thought I would come to see you, and then go back. Has General Johnston come home? No, sir. Then go back; you cannot come in here! The son hurried back to the beach, got aboard a schooner, and was with the army in time to share with his comrades under Shivers in the attack on Monterey. The following letter, written soon after the battle of Monterey, gives a sufficient view of the campaign, terminating in that fine feat of arms: Monterey, Mexico, September 28, 1846. my dear son: My regiment was disbanded at Camargo on the 24th of August, under the construction of the law given by the War Department in reference to six months volunteers. Soon after, General Taylor offered me the appointment of inspector-general of the field division of volunteers under Major-General Butler, which I accepted, as I was desirous of participating in the campaign which was about to commence. The army moved from Camargo, and was concentrated at C
Port Isabel (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
edily remedied both in means of transportation and equipment, and we have already seen a good many steamboats, adapted to river navigation, passing up the Rio Grande. The advanced guard has been pushed to Reynosa, about 60 miles above Matamoras, and several regiments are marching upon the same point; but, on account of the great quantity of rain which fell last month, their progress is necessarily slow. I am daily expecting my regiment to march. The troops are occupying Point Isabel, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande, Matamoras, and Reynosa, but we have no means of ascertaining the number-say 14,000. I visited the camp of the Louisville Legion on Brazos Island; they are a fine body of men; they are now at Burita. Rogers Lieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knew nothing
Matamoras (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ande. In spite of a protest and some acts of hostility committed by the Mexicans, a fortification was erected opposite Matamoras, afterward known as Fort Brown. On the 12th of April General Ampudia addressed a letter to General Taylor, requiring hed to river navigation, passing up the Rio Grande. The advanced guard has been pushed to Reynosa, about 60 miles above Matamoras, and several regiments are marching upon the same point; but, on account of the great quantity of rain which fell last aily expecting my regiment to march. The troops are occupying Point Isabel, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande, Matamoras, and Reynosa, but we have no means of ascertaining the number-say 14,000. I visited the camp of the Louisville Legion dney Johnston. A letter to Hancock, written August 11th, near Camargo, informs him of the movement of the troops from Matamoras to that point, and describes what he saw in his voyage up the Rio Grande. He portrays the six days journey up the tort
Camargo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
t they will acquire distinction. The commanding general is concentrating upon Camargo as rapidly as possible with the very limited means of transportation at his diiend, A. Sidney Johnston. A letter to Hancock, written August 11th, near Camargo, informs him of the movement of the troops from Matamoras to that point, and dd. The letter states: General Taylor is rapidly concentrating his force at Camargo. The regular troops are nearly all there, and the volunteers are all in motioerey, Mexico, September 28, 1846. my dear son: My regiment was disbanded at Camargo on the 24th of August, under the construction of the law given by the War Depaarticipating in the campaign which was about to commence. The army moved from Camargo, and was concentrated at Ceralvo on the 12th; and marched thence to Monterey, as inspector-general, he performed the duties of the office on the march from Camargo, and during the operations before Monterey, resulting in its capture, with zea
France (France) (search for this): chapter 10
inct would inculcate that. The desire of a speedy termination, as well as economy, points out Alvarado, or some place south of Vera Cruz (at the proper season), as the initial point of operation, retaining an army corps at Monterey, or on the route thence to Mexico. These movements would compel a concentration of the strength of Mexico at the capital, where a decisive engagement would soon be fought with adequate force and the war terminated. Mexico is to that republic what Paris is to France. If Mexico falls, her dependencies fall with her. Why, then, waste a cartridge on the castle of St. Juan d'ulloa, or throw away the public treasure in a war of marches against a country without population comparatively, as Santa F6, Chihuahua, or California? These are portions of country which Mexico does not pretend to defend against the Indians. Your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. A letter to Hancock, written August 11th, near Camargo, informs him of the movement of the troops fr
Palo Alto (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
relieved by the successes of the American troops. General Taylor started on his return from Point Isabel, on May 7th, with 2,300 soldiers, and, on the next day at noon, found the Mexican army, under General Ampudia, drawn up on the plain of Palo Alto to dispute his advance. An engagement ensued, in which the artillery acted a conspicuous part, ending in the retreat of the Mexicans with a loss of 600 men. The American loss was nine killed and 44 wounded. On the next day the American armnately, no vessel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of action. The time required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palo Alto and Resaca. His wife and infant son were left at Galveston under the care of Colonel Love and his good wife. Leonard Groce, for many years General Johnston's friend, knowing his military ardor, promptly sent him a fine war-horse, which bor
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Corpus Chriati. Six companies of Texan Rangers, under Hays, have been mustered into service. They are teaching the United States officers and soldiers how to ride. The feats of horsemanship of our frontier-men are most extraordinary. I saw one Volunteers were called for, and came pouring in from all quarters. The martial enthusiasm of the people — of the United States was only equaled by the imbecility of the Government in its preparations for the conflict. It was a political regimeication to the Secretary of War, recommending General Johnston to the favorable consideration of the President of the United States, in the strongest terms possible, for the appointment in question, which I did with a clear conscience and hearty goound that his assignment by the commanding general gave him no legal status. He was thus thrust, as it were, from the United States service. Happy and fortunate the people who can afford to cast aside as superfluous a soldier so willing and capable
Marin (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
aylor offered me the appointment of inspector-general of the field division of volunteers under Major-General Butler, which I accepted, as I was desirous of participating in the campaign which was about to commence. The army moved from Camargo, and was concentrated at Ceralvo on the 12th; and marched thence to Monterey, successively in divisions, on the 13th, 14th, and 15th, as follows: Twiggs's division on the 13th, Worth's on the 14th, and Butler's on the 15th. They were again united at Marin on the 17th, and arrived together at the forest of St. Domingo, three miles from Monterey, on the 19th. The 19th and 20th were passed in reconnoitring the position of the enemy's defenses and making the necessary disposition for the attack. These arrangements having been made, and General Worth's division having occupied the gorge of the mountain above the city on the Saltillo road, the attack was commenced by General Worth, who had by his position taken all their defenses in reverse, and
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