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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Leonard Groce (search for this): chapter 10
l Taylor had arrived in Galveston on the 28th of April, with a request to General Johnston to join him at once. As, unfortunately, no vessel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of action. The time required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palo Alto and Resaca. His wife and infant son were left at Galveston under the care of Colonel Love and his good wife. Leonard Groce, for many years General Johnston's friend, knowing his military ardor, promptly sent him a fine war-horse, which bore him nobly through the campaign. On the road to Point Isabel, General Johnston saw the tarantula for the first time. He had been ten years in Texas, and much in the field, without seeing one; but after passing Corpus Christi they appeared in great numbers, fiercely rearing themselves up and offering battle to an approaching horse and rider. The Texans were gathering
William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 10
unded, their leader being of the former. General Johnston afterward spoke of it as a remarkable eveit. During the assault upon the city, General Johnston accompanied Hamer's brigade of Butler's dal Butler was wounded at the same point. General Johnston's horse was thrice wounded; but, though hnce of his gallant charger probably saved General Johnston's life on this occasion, as he was left ahe field on which he fell, at Shiloh. General Johnston probably entered the cornfield a few minught, after the fight was done, he came to General Johnston, and, with tears standing in his eyes, tod henceforth to be accounted his friend. General Johnston felt a deep regret when Hamer, shortly afal Butler and General Taylor certified on General Johnston's pay-account that, as inspector-general, mob, thrust out her skinny finger toward General Johnston and hissed out, Tejano! Her divination o closed active operations for some time, General Johnston, having no fixed rank or employment recog[12 more...]
of March, 1846, General Taylor made a forward movement to Point Isabel, which commanded the mouth of the Rio Grande. In spite of a protest and some acts of hostility committed by the Mexicans, a fortification was erected opposite Matamoras, afterward known as Fort Brown. On the 12th of April General Ampudia addressed a letter to General Taylor, requiring him to withdraw to the left bank of the Nueces, or that arms alone must decide the question. A little later, the Mexicans captured Captain Thornton and 60 men, and committed other overt acts of war; and, finally, threatened General Taylor's communications with Point Isabel, his base of supply. To reestablish his communications and secure his base, General Taylor marched with his army to Point Isabel, leaving a small but sufficient garrison in the fort. The Mexicans opened upon the fort with a heavy bombardment, by which the commander, Major Brown, was killed; but the garrison held out until relieved by the successes of the Ameri
was throwing shells into the main fort near the upper end of the city. These divisions approached the city under a tremendous shower of artillery and musketry from the fort and numerous batteries, suffering great loss. Twiggs's division attacked the batteries, and afterward filed off by the right flank toward a tete-de-pont (a species of fort), across a branch of the St. Juan, which runs through the city. The Tennesseans and Mississippians of Butler's division and a few regulars under Captain Backus, moving rapidly in support, attacked the first battery or redoubt, a strong work armed with artillery and escopetas or muskets, and bravely carried the work (Alexander McClung, at the head of the Mississippians of his wing of the regiment, being the first to enter), driving the enemy from it with considerable loss. The Ohio regiment, under Colonel Mitchell, entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit; but here was concentrated the fire of all
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 10
ed for the situation, and can truly say that no one desires his success more than myself. At the same time, I regret to learn that General Houston is unfriendly to General Johnston, as I am disposed to believe if he exercises his influence with Mr. Polk, he will prevent his succeeding, as most, if not all, of the appointments made or selected from Texas will be on the recommendation of General Houston. I have, this moment, received orders from Washington to take possession of the country t when a recruit. Some days before the battle, there had been an unpleasant official. difference, reaching high words, between General Johnston and Brigadier-General Hamer. This officer had been a member of Congress, and was appointed by President Polk, because of his political importance. He was not a soldier, but he was a very gallant and estimable gentleman. On the field he found the counsel and assistance of General Johnston of the utmost value to him. He was a man of quick and genero
John C. Hays (search for this): chapter 10
. As Mexico not only asserted a general right to the sovereignty of Texas, but also set up a special claim to the country between the Rio Grande and the Nueces, as belonging to Tamaulipas, General Taylor, pending negotiations, established himself at Corpus Christi, near the mouth of the Nueces, where he remained until March 8, 1846. Love, writing to General Johnston in September, 1845, says: General Taylor has 4,000 soldiers at Corpus Chriati. Six companies of Texan Rangers, under Hays, have been mustered into service. They are teaching the United States officers and soldiers how to ride. The feats of horsemanship of our frontier-men are most extraordinary. I saw one of them pick up from the ground three dollars, each fifty yards apart, at full speed, and pass under the horse's neck at a pace not much short of full speed. On the 8th of March, 1846, General Taylor made a forward movement to Point Isabel, which commanded the mouth of the Rio Grande. In spite of a prot
nown as Fort Brown. On the 12th of April General Ampudia addressed a letter to General Taylor, reqay at noon, found the Mexican army, under General Ampudia, drawn up on the plain of Palo Alto to dit to give me General Taylor's draft with his (Ampudia's) signature, as early in the morning as I wosaddled, he joined me, and we rode on for General Ampudia's headquarters, at the Grand Plaza of Monm that I was there by appointment to meet General Ampudia, and wished to pass. Hie sent a soldier ate of affairs we saw the adjutant-general of Ampudia coming on horseback. We knew that he spoke E he would accompany us to the quarters of General Ampudia. He appreciated both his necessity and one, that neither of us would ever see it set. Ampudia received us with the extravagant demonstrati my holster when our horses were in charge of Ampudia's orderly. After we had ridden, perhaps a mirom violence only by the opportune arrival of Ampudia's adjutant-general. As it was evident tha[1 more...]
Thomas F. McKinney (search for this): chapter 10
would have to contend with a greatly superior force of Mexicans, he called for volunteers to sustain his movement. The Texan Legislature promptly passed a bill raising the quota of that State. It was proposed to confer upon the Governor, who was himself requested to take chief command, the appointment of field and staff officers; and, under this supposition, Governor Henderson wrote, May 8th, urging General Johnston to meet him at Point Isabel, and again, through their mutual friend, Thomas F. McKinney, assuring him that he should receive rank next to himself in the Texan contingent. A messenger from General Taylor had arrived in Galveston on the 28th of April, with a request to General Johnston to join him at once. As, unfortunately, no vessel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of action. The time required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palo Alto and
Charles W. Field (search for this): chapter 10
ny orders, but if you will move your regiment to the right place the rest may follow you. I moved off across a small stream, and through a field to the front of the tete-de-pont, which covered the front of the Purissima Bridge, where I met Captain Field, of the United States Infantry, with his company, and Colonel Mansfield, of the United States Engineers. Under their advice, a plan was formed for immediate attack; and, while we were making the needful dispositions, General Hamer, who had ied to show him the importance of our position. He was not convinced, but persisted in his own view. My men were withdrawn from the several posts assigned to them; but before this could be done the division had gone a considerable distance. Captain Field withdrew with me, and was killed while crossing the open field, by fire from the main fort. This field was inclosed by a high fence made of chaparral-bushes beaten down between upright posts. My regiment (the First Mississippi) was follo
demonstrations of his nation, ordered our horses to be taken care of, and invited us to breakfast with him. Declining the invitation, he was reminded of the object of our visit, and of the desire to avoid further delay in the exchange of the articles of capitulation. He promptly delivered the duplicate left with him, which he had signed; and we took formal leave of him. A little incident occurred during our brief visit, which illustrates one aspect of the Mexican character. In the Black-Hawk campaign, your father had given me one of a pair of pistols, and it was in my holster when our horses were in charge of Ampudia's orderly. After we had ridden, perhaps a mile, out of Monterey, on our way to General Taylor's headquarters, in leaping a ditch the flap of my holster flew up, and I discovered that the pistol had been stolen while we were holding an official interview with the general-in-chief. It was the loss of a weapon valued more for its associations than its intrinsic worth,
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