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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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J. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 3
o Sackett's Harbor. incident in artillery-practice. ordered to Jefferson Barracks. description of the post. expedition against the Winnebagoes. Red Bird. aversion to letter-writing. the angry flute-player. General Atkinson and his wife. Johnston's standing as an officer. a suicide. his charity in judgment. religious belief. St. Louis in old times. Henrietta Preston. her family connections. Governor William Clark. Thomas H. Benton. Miss Preston's education. marriage. Mrs. JohMrs. Johnston's character. Early married life. Little of general interest remains, either in documentary form or in the memories of men, respecting the early years of Albert Sidney Johnston's army-life. He passed the furlough granted after graduation in Kentucky with his father. The following incident of this visit is related in a letter from a friend, some five years General Johnston's junior, and still living in Kentucky, highly respected: Our intercourse was always pleasant, and to me in
n the 29th of August, and returned to Jefferson Barracks September 27th. The letter to Bickley, already quoted, describing the movement of troops to preserve peace on the Northwestern frontier, continues as follows: The detachment of the Sixth Regiment which left this place was accompanied by two companies of the Fifth Regiment from St. Peter's, up the Wisconsin River as far as the portage, where it was met by a detachment of the Second Regiment from Green Bay, under the command of Major Whistler. The Winnebagoes, in council, agreed to deliver up the leading men in the several outrages committed against the whites. Accordingly, Red Bird, Le Soleil, and two others, the son and brother-in-law of Red Bird, were given up, there; and two more, afterward, at Prairie du Ohien, belonging to the Prairie La Crosse band. They bound themselves to hold a council in the spring for the determination of the boundary-line; and to permit the miners of Fever River to proceed peaceably in their d
e at the capital. In a letter written to Lieutenant Johnston that winter she says: Our street is filled with members and their families, and we are all gay. Our house has already the name of The neutral ground, where all parties meet, and must, of course, be polite to each other. Parties innumerable, weddings, and grand dinners, fill up all the evening; visits and visitors, all the morning. In this brilliant and polished society, in which moved Clay and Calhoun, Webster, Benton, Everett, and Scott, Lieutenant Johnston had his first experience of the great world; but it made slight impression on a soul bent upon martial enterprise, and impatient for strenuous action. Mrs. Johnston exerted herself to make his stay agreeable, and he shared in all the pleasures of the cultivated society in which she was an acknowledged leader. The following popular piece of verse, written in her honor by the Hon. Warren R. Davis, of South Carolina, a wit and a poet, as well as a politici
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 3
nt, enjoyed justly the confidence of his Government and of the Indian tribes. With wealth, intelligence, virtue, and popular manners, he was well fitted for his place as a leader in a young republic. His first wife, Miss Julia Hancock, was a woman of eminent graces and singular beauty: after her death he married her cousin, Mrs. Radford. His descendants and collaterals are prominent citizens of St. Louis and Louisville. Thomas H. Benton belongs to history. Counted among the first, when Jackson, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay were his competitors, his name reopens a page illustrious in American annals. His wife was a daughter of Colonel James McDowell, of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and sister of the eloquent Governor of Virginia, of the same name. She was the niece and favorite kinswoman of Major Preston and spent four or five years in his house, devoting herself for the most part, as a matter of choice, to the education of his daughter Henrietta, then a little girl. As she was a
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 3
ories of men, respecting the early years of Albert Sidney Johnston's army-life. He passed the furlough granteted in a letter from a friend, some five years General Johnston's junior, and still living in Kentucky, highlyand in which he was supposed to be interested, General Johnston wrote, December 20, 1858: My grandfatherere were many points of resemblance between Albert Sidney Johnston and his wife; and a friend, who knew them bst loyal natures, these coincidences increased. Mrs. Johnston was above middle size-five feet six inches in hearacterized as piquant, graceful, and eloquent. Mrs. Johnston was a woman of firm yet gentle temper, and, as te establishment. They made occasional visits to Mrs. Johnston's mother, at Louisville, and Lieutenant JohnstonLieutenant Johnston, writing from that city, October 3, 1830, says, The last two months I have spent pleasantly and quietly in thern at Louisville, and, immediately afterward, Lieutenant Johnston was obliged to return to Jefferson Barracks.
Julia Hancock (search for this): chapter 3
rgy and intellect from which unthrift debarred the hero. He had early in life obtained great celebrity by his explorations, in conjunction with Lewis, of the sources of the Columbia River and in the Far West. He was Governor of Missouri for many years, and, as Indian agent, enjoyed justly the confidence of his Government and of the Indian tribes. With wealth, intelligence, virtue, and popular manners, he was well fitted for his place as a leader in a young republic. His first wife, Miss Julia Hancock, was a woman of eminent graces and singular beauty: after her death he married her cousin, Mrs. Radford. His descendants and collaterals are prominent citizens of St. Louis and Louisville. Thomas H. Benton belongs to history. Counted among the first, when Jackson, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay were his competitors, his name reopens a page illustrious in American annals. His wife was a daughter of Colonel James McDowell, of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and sister of the eloquent Govern
Josiah Stoddard Johnston (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 2: early army-life. Furlough passed in Kentucky. anecdote illustrating his benevolence. visit to Washington City. society there, in 1826. Mrs. J. S. Johnston. brilliant offer of General Scott to him declined. its influence on his career. ordered to Sackett's Harbor. incident in artillery-practice. ordered to Jefferson Barracks. description of the post. expedition against the Winnebagoes. Red Bird. aversion to letter-writing. the angry flute-player. General Atkinson and his wife. Johnston's standing as an officer. a suicide. his charity in judgment. religious belief. St. Louis in old times. Henrietta Preston. her family connections. Governor William Clark. Thomas H. Benton. Miss Preston's education. marriage. Mrs. Johnston's character. Early married life. Little of general interest remains, either in documentary form or in the memories of men, respecting the early years of Albert Sidney Johnston's army-life. He passed the furlough gra
James McDowell (search for this): chapter 3
tted for his place as a leader in a young republic. His first wife, Miss Julia Hancock, was a woman of eminent graces and singular beauty: after her death he married her cousin, Mrs. Radford. His descendants and collaterals are prominent citizens of St. Louis and Louisville. Thomas H. Benton belongs to history. Counted among the first, when Jackson, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay were his competitors, his name reopens a page illustrious in American annals. His wife was a daughter of Colonel James McDowell, of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and sister of the eloquent Governor of Virginia, of the same name. She was the niece and favorite kinswoman of Major Preston and spent four or five years in his house, devoting herself for the most part, as a matter of choice, to the education of his daughter Henrietta, then a little girl. As she was a woman of fine accomplishments and uncommon literary culture, as well as of a sprightly temper and vigorous intellect, she not only taught her pupil t
Edward Harris (search for this): chapter 3
reform me, which to a great extent was effectual, could have prompted his action. This kind of personal effort for the good of others is commonly given more grudgingly than advice, or even than money; but it does more good than either, because it evinces sympathy, and not merely benevolence. In explaining to the writer that he had divested himself of all claim to some land in which he was supposed to be interested, General Johnston wrote, December 20, 1858: My grandfather, Edward Harris, gave to my brother, J. H. Johnston, my sisters, and myself, 640 acres of land in Ohio. When I came of age I gave to Mr. Byers my interest in this land, and whatever else I inherited from my father, being a share in a small farm, a few negroes, and a homestead of small value. It was not much, but, whatever it was, I gave it all for the benefit of my sisters. My recollection is, that my father told me that his brothers united in this action. During the fall of 1826 Lieutenant Jo
Thomas L. Alexander (search for this): chapter 3
ed, after the lapse of some years, by her brilliant and beautiful sisters, made Jefferson Barracks something more than a mere military post; it was a delightful and elegant home for the gay and gallant young soldiers serving here their apprenticeship in arms. There was at this period of his life no officer more highly regarded in the regiment than the adjutant. Captain Eaton says of him that, while no man was more approachable, no one could remain unimpressed by his dignity; and Colonel Thomas L. Alexander, who joined the regiment in 1830, says that, possessing in an extraordinary degree the confidence, esteem, and admiration of the whole regiment, he was the very beau-ideal of a soldier and an officer. How early he began to exercise that forbearance in judging his fellowmen which afterward became so characteristic, may be seen in a letter to Eaton, written in this period: Our friend and fellow-soldier has destroyed himself. Being entirely unprepared for such an event, you
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