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Elkhorn, Walworth County, Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
pewter extinguisher, puts out the light that shines over many a league of land and sea. No man has any tenure of the things of this world in the grave. His power, his authority, most of his influence, die with him. There come others in his place, and all his plans, his methods, and his informing spirit, are changed. It was so in this case. General Beauregard retired to Corinth, where Van Dorn reinforced him almost immediately with 17,000 men, the strong fighters of Wilson's Creek and Elkhorn. These troops, added to the effective total reported by Jordan after the battle of Shiloh, 32,212, give an army of nearly 50,000 men fit for duty. Reinforcements were poured in from every quarter. But, with an aggregate on the rolls of 112,092, the effective total could not be gotten above a reported effective force of 52,706 men. The sick and absent numbered more than one-half the army. No sudden epidemic had smitten the camp; the sickness was the effect of causes evident from the hour
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
rtained conclusively from the movements of the enemy on the Tennessee River, and from reliable sources of information, that his aim would be to cut off my communication-in West Tennessee with the Eastern and Southern States, by operating from the Tennessee River between Crump's Landing and Eastport as a base — I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them (chiefly regiments from Louisiana) soon reached this vicinity, and, with two divisions of General Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Major-General Bragg, constituted the Army of the Mississippi. At the same time General Johnston, being at Murfreesboro, on the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
ary command a permanent one. Appendix. General Beauregard's official report. Headquarters, Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Mississippi, April 11, 1862. General: On the 2d ultimo, having ascertained conclusively from the movements of the enemy on the Tennessee River, and from reliable sources of information, that his aim would be to cut off my communication-in West Tennessee with the Eastern and Southern States, by operating from the Tennessee River between Crump's Landing and Eastport as a base — I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them (chiefly regiments from Louisiana) soon reached this vicinity, and, with two divisions of General Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Major-General Bragg, constituted the Army of
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
e with the Eastern and Southern States, by operating from the Tennessee River between Crump's Landing and Eastport as a base — I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them (chiefly regiments from Louisiana) soon reached this vicinity, and, with two divisions of General Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Major-General Bragg, constituted the Army of the Mississippi. At the same time General Johnston, being at Murfreesboro, on the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might fall on and crush the enemy should he attempt to advance from under his gunboats. The call on General Johnston was promptly complied with. His entire force was also hastened in this d
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
le of Shiloh. United States troops engaged at Shiloh. I. The night of the 6th. I. The nle of Shiloh. United States troops engaged at Shiloh. Nightfall found the victorious Confederateed his troops a mile and a half to the rear of Shiloh. This is a mistake. Clark's division, now unf advance was along the road from Pittsburg to Shiloh, and through the adjacent country to the southn, this force fell back to the neighborhood of Shiloh, which it held till ordered to retreat. On Brigade had occupied McDowell's camps between Shiloh and Owl Creek, feasting and making themselves day as the salient — the point of a wedge at Shiloh, struggling with the heaviest masses of the So fight so audaciously on any other field as at Shiloh. It is the same on the Federal side; and bir steel. But the magnitude of the contest at Shiloh, and the tremendous issues at stake, the impet countrymen in front of the rude log chapel of Shiloh, especially when it is known that on Monday, f[5 more...]
Crescent City (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
s brigade, and the remains of Jackson's, which had fallen to pieces in the night, were there. The regiments of Gladden's brigade were represented by small bands of one or two hundred men, under various commanders. Colonel Deas, with 224 men of Gladden's brigade, was aided by the Fourth Kentucky, which had become detached from Trabue's brigade. In a charge he lost half of them. The First Tennessee from Stephens's brigade, the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee from Johnson's, and the Crescent Regiment from Pond's, which had so distinguished itself on the left centre the previous afternoon, were found mingled in the confused and bloody conflict on the right. Chalmers was at one time detached from the command of his own brigade by General Withers, in order to lead one of these conglomerate commands; and Colonel Wheeler had charge of two or three regiments thrown together. General Withers strove, with great gallantry and skill, to bring order out of all this confusion; but in vai
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
,000 men, at least, arrayed against us on that day. In connection with the results of the battle I should state that the most of our men who had inferior arms exchanged them for the improved arms of the enemy. Also, that most of the property, public and personal, in the camp from which the enemy was driven on Sunday, was rendered useless or greatly damaged, except some of the tents. With this are transmitted certain papers, to wit: Order of movements, marked A. A list of the killed and wounded, marked B. A list of captured flags, marked C; and a map of the field of battle, marked D. All of which is respectfully submitted through my volunteer aide-de-camp, Colonel Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, who has in charge the flags, standards, and colors, captured from the enemy. I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General commanding. To General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General Confederate States Army, Richmond, Va.
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
rom the Tennessee River between Crump's Landing and Eastport as a base — I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them (chiefly regiments from Louisiana) soon reached this vicinity, and, with two divisions of General Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Major-General Bragg, constituted the Army of the Mississippi. At the same time General Johnston, being at Murfreesboro, on the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might fall on and crush the enemy should he attempt to advance from under his gunboats. The call on General Johnston was promptly complied with. His entire force was also hastened in this direction; and by the first of April our united forces
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 39
Sunday's battle was the most terrible that he had witnessed during his whole career. Badeau remarks (volume i., page 78) in regard to the assault on Sherman Sunday morning, that it was successful, after several hours of as desperate fighting as was ever seen on the American Continent. He says (page 89), With the exception of one or two severe struggles, the fighting of April 7th was light when compared with that of Sunday. Again (page 93): It was the fiercest fight of the war west of the Alleghanies, and, in proportion to the numbers engaged, equaled any contest during the rebellion. I have heard Sherman say that he never saw such terrible fighting afterward, and Grant compared Shiloh only with the Wilderness. He adds truly: In the battle, each party was forced to respect the fighting qualities of the other; the Northerners recognized the impetuous vigor and splendid enthusiasm of the rebels, and the latter found all the tenacity and determination of the North in those who oppose
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 39
f April our united forces were concentrated along the Mobile & Ohio Railroad from Bethel to Corinth, and on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad from Corinth to Iuka. It was then determined to assume the offensive, and strike a sudden blow at the enemy in position, under General Grant, on the west bank of the Tennessee, at Pittsburg, and in the direction of Savannah, before he was reinforced by the army under General Buell, then known to be advancing for that purpose by rapid marches from Nashville and Columbia. About the same time General Johnston was advised that such an operation conformed to the expectations of the President. By a rapid and vigorous attack on General Grant, it was expected he would be beaten back into his transports and the river, or captured, in time to enable us to profit by the victory and remove to the rear all the stores and munitions that would fall into our hands, in such an event, before the arrival of General Buell's army on the scene. It was never
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