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W. E. Goolsby (search for this): chapter 39
ustin, Major H. E. Peyton, Captain Albert Ferry, Captain B. B. Waddell. Captain W. W. Porter, of Major-General Crittenden's staff, also reported for duty, and shared the duties of my volunteer staff on Monday. Brigadier-General Trudeau, of Louisiana Volunteers, also, for a part of the first day's conflict, was with me as a volunteer aide. Captain E. H. Cummins, signal-officer, also, was actively employed as a staff officer on both days. Nor must I fail to mention that Private W. E. Goolsby, Eleventh Regiment Virginia Volunteers, orderly to my headquarters since last June, repeatedly employed to carry my verbal orders to the field, discharged the duty with great zeal and intelligence. Other members of my staff were necessarily absent from the immediate field of battle, intrusted with responsible duties at these headquarters, namely: Captain F. H. Jordan, assistant adjutant-general, in charge of general headquarters; Major Eugene E. McLean, chief quartermaster; Capta
William Joseph Hardee (search for this): chapter 39
f the main line to support the extreme right of General Hardee's line. I was again ordered by General Beauregn opposed to it, in the main under the direction of Hardee. General Crittenden said to the writer that this wGibson's, and eventually by Kirk's brigade. General Hardee's report contains this account of Monday's battas left of Hindman's and Cleburne's commands, under Hardee's own eye, formed the nucleus of the defense. Clebicers killed. Bragg had two horses shot under him; Hardee was slightly wounded, his coat cut and his horse dihird and the reserve. The first line, under Major-General Hardee, was constituted of his corps, augmented on corps commanders as Major-Generals Polk, Bragg, and Hardee, and Brigadier-General Breckinridge, commanding theh the enemy. To Major-Generals Polk, Bragg, and Hardee, commanding corps, and to Brigadier-General Breckinal Bragg had two horses shot under him; that Major-General Hardee was slightly wounded, his coat rent by balls
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 39
battle at the centre. attack by Grant's army. Polk's defense at Shiloh Church. Bragg resists Lew f the 7th, at 20,000 men. Jordan also says that Polk led his troops a mile and a half to the rear ofal and position were reported that night by General Polk to General Beauregard, who gave no orders for their return. Polk joined them, in order to be sure of their early presence on the field, and leline was just formed in this position, when General Polk ordered me forward to support his line. While moving to the support of General Polk, an order reached me from General Beauregard to report to ds of troops under Cheatham and Gibson. General Polk led Cheatham's division, which had probablytout line slowly fell back in sullen defiance. Polk says: They engaged the enemy so soon as trs you want! and thus he was supplied. Captain Polk lost a leg, fighting his guns well; Hodgson order as the first. The army corps, under General Polk, followed the second line, at the distance [9 more...]
Lovell H. Rousseau (search for this): chapter 39
to it, in the main under the direction of Hardee. General Crittenden said to the writer that this was the hardest fighting he saw in the war, and was over a very narrow space. Between eight and nine o'clock, McCook's leading brigade, under Rousseau, went in on the centre, soon followed by Gibson's, and eventually by Kirk's brigade. General Hardee's report contains this account of Monday's battle: On Monday, about six o'clock, portions of my command were formed upon an alignment wtest: stubborn combats in the woods, charges, repulses, counter-charges, surges of slaughter and fury, with lulls and pauses in the heat and motion of the fray. The Federal officers rivaled their adversaries in the display of personal bravery. Rousseau behaved with great gallantry. Colonel Kirk, commanding the Fifth Brigade, McCook's division, came upon the Thirty-fourth Illinois as it wavered, appalled, before a burst of battle-flame which had killed its commander, Major Levenway. It was Ki
S. S. Heard (search for this): chapter 39
original position. Colonel Stanley, of the Ninth Texas, did the same thing with the same result. Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, of the Seventeenth Louisiana, says that, just before the retreat, having collected some two hundred stragglers into line, General Ruggles ordered them to advance, and adds: The general at this instant rode in front of the lines, and, seizing the flag from the hands of the color-bearer, gallantly led them to the charge. In this charge he was assisted by Colonel S. S. Heard. Colonel Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee, says of Captain John C. Carter: At one time he took the flag, and, urging his men forward, rendered me great assistance in moving forward the entire regiment. Major Caldwell, of the Twelfth Tennessee, says in his report: Private Fielder took charge of Companies B and G, which were left without a commissioned officer. He led these two companies all day in the thickest part of the battle. Colonel Mouton, of the Eighteent
Hildebrand (search for this): chapter 39
n's Texas Rangers; and John Morgan, with some of his men. Sherman advanced with two brigades and the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and, receiving the support of a column from General Wood, proceeded cautiously on a reconnaissance. Marching with Hildebrand's unfortunate Third Brigade in front, he came upon Forrest's cavalry command. He at once threw out the Seventy-seventh Ohio Regiment, supported by the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, when Forrest, perceiving the Federal infantry somewhat disordered iifty yards of the Federal line. A volley greeted him, inflicting a severe wound in his side, and mortally wounding his horse. Nevertheless, in spite of special efforts to kill him, he got back to his men, and away. Sherman reports fifteen of Hildebrand's men killed and twenty-five wounded, which does not seem to include the cavalry, and he makes no mention of seventy-five prisoners, said by Colonel Jordan to have been captured and carried off. No steps were taken in pursuit. There is one
ery narrow space. Between eight and nine o'clock, McCook's leading brigade, under Rousseau, went in on the centre, soon followed by Gibson's, and eventually by Kirk's brigade. General Hardee's report contains this account of Monday's battle: On Monday, about six o'clock, portions of my command were formed upon an alin the heat and motion of the fray. The Federal officers rivaled their adversaries in the display of personal bravery. Rousseau behaved with great gallantry. Colonel Kirk, commanding the Fifth Brigade, McCook's division, came upon the Thirty-fourth Illinois as it wavered, appalled, before a burst of battle-flame which had killed its commander, Major Levenway. It was Kirk's own regiment. He seized a flag, rushed forward, and steadied the line again; while doing this he was severely wounded in the shoulder. McCook's troops deserve the more credit for their persistent attacks, as they had marched twenty-two miles the day before, and a portion of them
the adjacent country to the southeast. Here Breckinridge's two brigades, under Bowen and Statham, and what was left of Hindman's and Cleburne's commands, under Hardee's own eye, formed the nucleus of the defense. Cleburne, who had gone in on Sundkansas in a counter-charge, and repulsed them. Here fell Lieutenant- Colonel Patton, its sole surviving field officer. Hindman's troops fought near by, with almost identical results. The Southern troops held the Federal army at bay with obstiny wounded, and had three horses shot under him. Brigadier-Generals Clark, Bowen, and Johnson, were severely wounded, and Hindman was injured by a shell exploding under his horse and killing it. Colonel Smith, who succeeded Bushrod Johnson in commandd a severe wound also on the first day, which will deprive the army of his valuable services for some time. Brigadier-General Hindman, engaged in the outset of the battle, was conspicuous for a cool courage efficiently employed in leading his me
him; and then McCook. The interval between McCook and Wallace was occupied by such commands of Grant's army as the officers had been able to get into shape. Badeau Life of Grant, page 86) says: All the camps originally occupied by the national troops were in the hands of the enemy, but the rebel advance had been checke The Comte de Paris says (volume i., page 542) that Sherman told him that Sunday's battle was the most terrible that he had witnessed during his whole career. Badeau remarks (volume i., page 78) in regard to the assault on Sherman Sunday morning, that it was successful, after several hours of as desperate fighting as was ever nd march was turned into a siege of the South. Halleck took chief command on the 9th, and Grant, though left nominally second in command, was, as his biographer, Badeau, admits, under a cloud, unconsulted, unemployed, and in disgrace. If he had not possessed excellent qualities for war, not to be disregarded in perilous times, h
mand, at his headquarters. This was on the extreme left; where my brigade became engaged in the fight, which continued until the contest between the armies ceased. The attack of the Federal army was well conducted, systematic, and spirited. Ammen's brigade was opposed to Chalmers, next the river; and Hazen's brigade, on Nelson's right, charged with great dash and success, until it was cut up by cross-fires from Breckinridge's command. Hazen and Ammen were driven back, but were rallied onAmmen were driven back, but were rallied on Terrell's artillery, and on Crittenden's left brigade under Smith, and their own reserve under Bruce. The regiments in reserve of the Army of the Tennessee were also brought up. Nelson must have displayed conspicuous gallantry in this conflict. He is said to have been recognized animating his men by Kentuckians on the Confederate side. Crittenden's division moved simultaneously with Nelson's, and with well-delivered blows; but, as has been seen, they were unavailing to break down the wal
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