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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Henry Atkinson (search for this): chapter 4
ohnston's journal. movements of troops. General Atkinson's negotiations for peace. Pacific course report, as assistant adjutant-general of General Atkinson, but his private journal furnished the moar: On the 1st of April, 1832, Brigadier-General Atkinson, then commanding the right wing, Wesn obedience to the above-mentioned order, General Atkinson set off for the Upper Mississippi, with sad the power. The speakers also informed General Atkinson that Black Hawk was eight or nine miles ufatigue and insufficiency of proper food, General Atkinson selected about 900 of the best mounted von, had been interposed, under orders from General Atkinson, to cut off his retreat; and a sharp skirre to stop the effusion of blood, induced General Atkinson to desist from the pursuit of the miserabthe presence of an overpowering force, to General Atkinson, as he had yielded to General Gaines the of War addressed the following letter to General Atkinson: Department of War, October 24, 1882. [16 more...]
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 4
white settler's life was not worth a pin's fee with them. The Hon. Jefferson Davis related to the writer how, at such a time, with only threee probably killed before the main body was discovered. The Hon. Jefferson Davis told the writer that the Indians now became very insolent.o have reenlisted as a private in an independent spy company. Jefferson Davis, who was with General Gaines in his operations in 1831, was abwhence they were routed by a detachment of regulars under Lieutenant Jefferson Davis. In despair they gave themselves up to two Winnebago Indsity of his passions, and the singleness of his purpose. Hon. Jefferson Davis informed the writer that Black Hawk told him, while he was illage; and that there was no engagement not to join the Prophet. Mr. Davis said Keokuk was a politic man; but that Black Hawk was a proud, ge. He bore himself with dignity in his confinement, and thanked Mr. Davis for his kindness to him. Black Hawk saw his power pass to his
and skirmishes, and in the heavy fight at Wisconsin Heights, had greatly weakened Black Hawk's force, which had been further diminished by the desertion of his Indian allies, as the tide of war turned against him. Moreover, after the affair at Wisconsin Heights too, a detachment, under Lieutenant Ritner, sent from Prairie du Chien, intercepted a party of the Sacs attempting to descend the Wisconsin, and killed fifteen men and captured four men and thirty-two women and children. When Black Hawk reached the Mississippi, and was preparing to effect its passage on the 1st of August, he found the steamboat Warrior ready to dispute the crossing. This boat, with a detachment of troops and a cannon, had been interposed, under orders from General Atkinson, to cut off his retreat; and a sharp skirmish ensued, with the effect, at least, of retarding his flight until the assault of the main body on August 2d. The fight on that day, known as the battle of the Bad Axe, from a stream near by
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 4
ts in regard to the campaign based upon Lieutenant Johnston's report, as assistant adjutant-generallowing extracts from a letter of his to Lieutenant Johnston, written in December, 1833, after the cmpelled to punish. The following is Lieutenant Johnston's account of the occurrences of the warcil. The minutes of the council, in Lieutenant Johnston's handwriting, give the speech of Generrriors, after a desperate conflict. Lieutenant Johnston remarks in his journal: The truthy reason of undergrowth and swamps. Lieutenant Johnston says in his journal: The volunteees below Fort Winnebago. A letter from Mrs. Johnston to her mother gives the following account three miles of the Wisconsin River. In Mrs. Johnston's letter, already quoted, occurs the folloldiers to overtake the mounted Indians; but Mr. Johnston was more sanguine. His letter is not here. cross the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien. Mr. Johnston thinks they will be overtaken before they r[8 more...]
C. F. Smith (search for this): chapter 4
above Blue Mounds. The Indians rose the crest of a hill on horseback, set up a yell, and fired, when they discovered the whites. The mounted men formed, yelled as dreadfully as the enemy, dismounted, and charged on them. There was one man killed, and eight wounded, but none badly. Between thirty-five and forty Indians were killed, and it was supposed that numbers were wounded. They were pursued till night, when they escaped, much shattered, to an island in the Wisconsin; leaving (as Captain Smith writes) many old men, and sick and dead children, on their march. They also abandoned all their heavy baggage. The whites had but one day's provisions, and were, consequently, compelled to return for more. Though the volunteers had marched that day forty miles, and were drenched with a six hours rain, they attacked the Indians with great spirit. Black Hawk, however, made a gallant stand, to enable his women and children to get across the river, which they succeeded in doing; and
Fox Indians (search for this): chapter 4
dges of Winnebagoes, and many Kickapoos, Pottawattamies, and other Indians, were present with the British band in the campaign of 1832. The his conspiracy — not by direct collision between the white men and Indians, but by one of those bloody outrages of one tribe upon another, sohe Falls of St. Anthony, surrounded as it was by powerful bands of Indians, precluded the possibility of drawing any portion of the force fro Here the commanding officer was informed that the British band of Indians, under Mucatah-mich-i-ca-Kaik Spelled, by McKenny and Hall, Mash us to keep at peace, and have nothing to do with the Rock River Indians. We will do so. In token of our intentions, you see we have laid neral Atkinson, having sent several persons to the British band of Indians, and hearing nothing of them, resolved to dispatch two young Sacs y authorities, thus: The hostile incursions of the Sac and Fox Indians necessarily led to the interposition of the Government. A porti
g on July 20th; but, in consequence of information received from Generals Henry and Dodge, the command was marched, on July 21st, toward Blue Mounds, one hundred miles distant, where a junction was effected on the 24th with General Henry, who had fallen back there for provisions. In their forced march along a ridge, through a swampy and flooded country, the troops suffered from storms, want of drinking-water, and dysentery, caused by the raw pork and dough, which was their only food. On the 25th, the regulars, with Alexander's and Henry's brigades, moved to within three miles of the Wisconsin River. In Mrs. Johnston's letter, already quoted, occurs the following: We got letters again last night, dated the 27th. Our men had hurried on to the scene of action, as soon as the express arrived, leaving their sick and baggage at Blue Mounds. They were constructing rafts, to cross the Wisconsin at that point, for it was much swollen with late rains. They expected to get over th
gements to adhere to the British cause in the event of war. In 1811, however, another deputation from the tribe visited Washington City, and offered their services in the impending war, but were requested by the President to remain neutral. In 1812 they again offered to assist the Americans, but were told to stay peaceably at home, to which command the greater part of the tribe reluctantly submitted. About two hundred of the more restless braves, eager for blood and plunder, joined the Brit, and Osages, in many battles, and truthfully claimed that he had killed many foes with his own hand. He seems from the first to have had an aversion to the Americans, and to have cherished an hereditary friendship for the British. In the War of 1812 he had led to their aid about two hundred of his own tribe, and commanded a band numbering in all about five hundred warriors. He shared in the hostilities against the Americans in that war, though without special distinction; but, at its close,
were drenched with a six hours rain, they attacked the Indians with great spirit. Black Hawk, however, made a gallant stand, to enable his women and children to get across the river, which they succeeded in doing; and his band made their escape during the night in bark canoes. He was said to have lost sixty-eight men, but this number probably included those fugitives killed and captured by Lieutenant Ritner. The volunteers fell back to Blue Mounds, where they arrived on the evening of the 23d, and were joined next day by the main body. During the campaign, Black Hawk's people had suffered much from want of provisions; many subsisted on the roots and bark of trees, and some starved to death. On the 14th of July several families of Winnebagoes came into camp, much in need of provisions. July 16th, General Atkinson received dispatches from General Scott. He speaks of the deplorable condition of his command of regular troops at Chicago and elsewhere on the lakes, as far as Detr
payment of $2,234.50, and an annuity of $1,000, they relinquished all their lands outside certain prescribed limits. In 1810, when war was impending between the United States and Great Britain, the emissaries of the latter power induced a hundred or a hundred and fifty Sacs to visit the British agent on the island of St. Joseph, in Lake Huron, where they received arms, ammunition, and other presents, and most probably made engagements to adhere to the British cause in the event of war. In 1811, however, another deputation from the tribe visited Washington City, and offered their services in the impending war, but were requested by the President to remain neutral. In 1812 they again offered to assist the Americans, but were told to stay peaceably at home, to which command the greater part of the tribe reluctantly submitted. About two hundred of the more restless braves, eager for blood and plunder, joined the British, and shared in the military operations on the northwestern fr
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