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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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ple, whatever spirit of emulation or competition was exhibited among us, it never met with favor. In all things their maxims were apparent: We are more numerous, and will rule as it suits ourselves--our interests must be always attended to — we know nothing of the rights, privileges, or customs of those who did most to gain our independence; all we know and remember is--ourselves These are not my ideas alone, but the sentiments of the whole South. Were not Douglas, Buchanan, Pierce, Dickinson, and infamous Butler, supposed friends of the South, fully aware of all these grievances, and did they attempt to ameliorate our condition, or seek to obtain for us common justice, or even an impartial hearing? Ambitious as they were for favor, the North was always courted, as being the most populous, and whatever praise they seemed to bestow upon us was qualified in such a manner as to be construed in any way. Douglas, of whom much has been said, was not a truthful or reliable man, for i
tended to — we know nothing of the rights, privileges, or customs of those who did most to gain our independence; all we know and remember is--ourselves These are not my ideas alone, but the sentiments of the whole South. Were not Douglas, Buchanan, Pierce, Dickinson, and infamous Butler, supposed friends of the South, fully aware of all these grievances, and did they attempt to ameliorate our condition, or seek to obtain for us common justice, or even an impartial hearing? Ambitious as te man, McClellan is the best officer they could select; but they will not keep him long a remark which seemed prophetic. Nor can we forget the part which Davis and his friends instigated Floyd, Cobb, and others to play when Cabinet Ministers to Buchanan — it may seem disreputable, but I don't think so, for self-preservation is the first law of nature. When it became evident that North and South could no longer live amicably together, and that dissolution was inevitable, Floyd, as Minister of W
ining to our rights and necessities. We have looked upon human nature incorrectly, and attributed to it more honesty and honor than it possesses, and now we feel surprised to find the world other than we expected. We might have seen long ago, that, with a great influx of abolition feeling and atheism into the country, it was time to prepare for the irrepressible conflict; instead of which, by remaining inactive, we allowed the deluge to burst upon us before the ark was ready. From the year 1832, when South-Carolina first seceded, and Jackson forced her back into the Union, until the present hour, it was clear to all that a disruption was inevitable, and it behooved us to prepare for it as quietly as South-Carolina did, and not waste our energies in useless congressional debates, which could never wring one particle of justice from the absolutism of the jaundiced-eyed majority. 'Tis true that our leaders did not exert themselves discreetly, said another, or the same results could
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