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Groveton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ad, and one copy of Harper's Magazine, full of charming pictures of rebels, running, or being annihilated, in every portion of the country. On the next morning, Stuart left Fitz Lee in front of Bull Run, to oppose any advance of the Federal cavalry there, and, taking Hampton's division, set out through a torrent of rain to make a flank movement against General Meade's right beyond the Little River Turnpike. He had intended to cross at Sudley Ford, but coming upon the Federal cavalry near Groveton, a fight ensued, and the column could not cross there without having the movement unmasked. Stuart accordingly turned to the left; made a detour through Gainsville; and advancing, amid a violent storm, bivouacked that night beyond the Little Catharpin. The General on this day kept his entire staff and surroundings in great good-humour, by his songs and laughter, which only seemed to grow more jovial as the storm became more violent. I hope the reader will not regard this statement as unw
Cumberland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
tchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as we used to call them, was heard a few miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison, along the base of the Blue Ridge, to flank General Meade's right, cu
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ea entered the minds of the enemy, it must have been encouraged by Young's next move. He had held his ground without flinching; and now, as night descended, he ordered camp fires to be built along two miles of front, and bringing up his splendid brass band, played the Bonnie Blue flag and Dixie with defiant animation. This ruse seemed to decide the matter; the Federal commander made no further effort to advance; and in the morning there was not a Federal soldier on the south bank of the Rappahannock. Their corps of infantry and two brigades of cavalry had fallen back in good order: and the laughing Young remained master of the situation. Stuart had pushed on, meanwhile, toward Warrenton Springs, and just as the fight above described commenced, a gallant affair took place above. The enemy were attacked in the town of Jeffersonton, and after a hot fight forced back to Warrenton Springs, where the Jefferson Company again distinguished itself. The attempt was made to charge over t
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
l ever better understood the difficult art of coolly retiring without loss, and promptly advancing to his former position at the right moment. As in other sketches, the writer will aim rather to present such details and incidents as convey a clear idea of the actual occurrence, then to indulge in historical generalization. Often the least trifling of things are trifles. In October, 1863, General Meade's army was around Culpeper Court-House, with the advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the
James City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
nemy-their advance force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, being near the little village of James City. The picket on a little stream was driven in, and pushing on to Thoroughfare Mountain (not tohed on without stopping, and speedily became engaged with the main force of Federal cavalry at James City. This force was commanded by General Kilpatrick, we afterwards discovered, and this gentlemannt, but her captors retained her. I am anticipating. General Kilpatrick was in command at James City, and, drawing up his cavalry on the high ground beyond, prepared to receive Stuart's attack. l had moved unseen to their position on the Sperryville road, thanks to the stand of Stuart at James City; and now, for the first time, the enemy seemed to understand the nature of the blow about to bIt was the gay and gallant P. M. B. Young, of Georgia, who had been left with his brigade near James City, and now came to Rosser's assistance. Young passed through the Court-House at a trot, hastene
as captured. General Meade had swept clean. There were even very few empty boxes. On Cumberland George's hill, the Federal artillery fought hard for a time, inflicting some loss; but Gordon was sent round by the Rixeyville Road to the left; Stuart advanced in front; and the enemy fell back toward Brandy. The reader will remember that General Fitz Lee had been left on the Lower Rapidan to repulse any assault in that direction, and the expected assault had been made. I think it was General Buford who attacked him; but the attack was unsuccessful, and as the enemy fell back Fitz Lee pressed forward on the track of the retreating column toward Brandy. We now heard the thunder of his guns upon the right as he pushed on toward the Rappahannock, and everything seemed to be concentrating in the neighbourhood of Fleetwood Hill, the scene of the sanguinary conflict of the 9th of June preceding. There the great struggle, in fact, took place-Stuart pressing the main column on their line
Cumberland George (search for this): chapter 2.22
sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as we used to call them, was heard a few miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison, along the base of the Blue bbish. Not a wagon, ambulance, or piece of artillery, I believe, was captured. General Meade had swept clean. There were even very few empty boxes. On Cumberland George's hill, the Federal artillery fought hard for a time, inflicting some loss; but Gordon was sent round by the Rixeyville Road to the left; Stuart advanced in
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 2.22
ch outraged, it would appear, at the hasty manner in which Stuart had compelled him to evacuate Culpeper; and he now felt an ardent desire, before the campaign ended, to give the great cavalier a Roland for his Oliver. With about 3,000 cavalry he accordingly crossed Bull Run, following upon Stuart's track as the latter fell back; and soon he had reached the little village of Bucklands, not far from New Baltimore. Stuart had disappeared; but these disappearances of Stuart, like those of Jackson, were always dangerous. In fact, a ruse was about to be practised upon General Kilpatrick, who was known to want caution, and this ruse was of the simplest description. Stuart had arranged that he should retire before Kilpatrick as he advanced, until the Federal column was beyond Bucklandsthen Fitz Lee, who had fallen back from Manassas on the line of the Orange Railroad, would have an opportunity to fall upon the enemy's flank and rear. The sound of Fitz Lee's guns would be the signal
head, and, in the face of a heavy and determined fire from a double line of Federal sharpshooters, they charged across. The Federal force gave way before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet through his breast. At Mr. M—‘s, near the river, young Marshall, of Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The
n. Often the least trifling of things are trifles. In October, 1863, General Meade's army was around Culpeper Court-House, with the advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as we used to call them, was heard a few miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons
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