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ed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet through his breast. At Mr. M—‘s, near the river, young Marshall, of Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The army pushed on to Warrenton, the cavalry still in advance, and on the evening of the next day Stuart rapidly advanced with his column to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of his great raid
ned to the remarks of Stuart and his staff, until he thought he could get away. The quick eye of General Stuart, however, penetrated his disguise, and he was a prisoner. It was now night, and operations were over for the day. The retreat had been admirably managed. General Meade had carried off everything. We did not capture a wagon wheel. All was beyond Bull Run. The present writer here records his own capture, viz. one oilcloth, one feed of oats, found in the road, and one copy of Harper's Magazine, full of charming pictures of rebels, running, or being annihilated, in every portion of the country. On the next morning, Stuart left Fitz Lee in front of Bull Run, to oppose any advance of the Federal cavalry there, and, taking Hampton's division, set out through a torrent of rain to make a flank movement against General Meade's right beyond the Little River Turnpike. He had intended to cross at Sudley Ford, but coming upon the Federal cavalry near Groveton, a fight ensued, a
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 2.22
ill then streaming toward Madison Court-House, Stuart came on the exterior picket of the enemy-theirldier or kindlier gentleman. Ii. At dawn Stuart was again in the saddle, pressing forward upone Federal cavalry was attacked and driven; and Stuart was pushing on, when the presence of a Federale fields on Stone House Mountain as quickly as Stuart, moving parallel to his column, and suddenly t Near Brandy it encountered what seemed to be Stuart's entire cavalry. At various openings in the way before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward one of the most curious of the war. Iii. Stuart had just passed Auburn, when General Gordon, c the Federal artillery. Who is that? said General Stuart, pointing to the figure, indistinct in the portion of the country. On the next morning, Stuart left Fitz Lee in front of Bull Run, to oppose had carried out his half of the programme, and Stuart hastened to do the rest. At the sound of Gene[54 more...]
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 2.22
being cut off, and double-quicked toward the rear. They reached the fields on Stone House Mountain as quickly as Stuart, moving parallel to his column, and suddenly their line appeared. I have rarely seen General Stuart more excited. It was a rich prize, that regiment, and it appeared in his grasp! But, unfortunately, his column was not up. He was leading a mere advance guard, and that was scattered. Every available staff-officer and courier was hurried back for the cavalry, and the Jefferson company, Lieutenant Baylor, got up first, and charged straight at the flank of the infantry. They were suddenly halted, formed line of battle, and the bright muskets fell to a level like a single weapon. The cavalry company received the fire at thirty yards, but pressed on, and would doubtless have ridden over the infantry, now scattering in great disorder, but for an impassable ditch. Before they could make a detour to avoid it, the Federal infantry had scattered, every man for himself
into a regiment of infantry which had hastily formed line of battle at the noise of the firing. Gordon, that gallant North Carolinian, at once became hotly engaged; but there was no time to stop lon still remained quiet. His headquarters that night were at Mr. H's where that brave spirit, General Gordon, of the cavalry, came to see him. It is a melancholy pleasure to recall the gallant face of Gordon, now that he is dead; to remember his charming smile, his gay humour; the elegant little speech which he made as he gallantly presented a nosegay to the fair Miss H , bowing low as he did so amumberland George's hill, the Federal artillery fought hard for a time, inflicting some loss; but Gordon was sent round by the Rixeyville Road to the left; Stuart advanced in front; and the enemy fell lowed was one of the most curious of the war. Iii. Stuart had just passed Auburn, when General Gordon, commanding the rear of his column, sent him word that a heavy force of the enemy's infantry
James City. This force was commanded by General Kilpatrick, we afterwards discovered, and this gentrse near the town where races were held, General Kilpatrick having, it is said, a favorite mare callrs retained her. I am anticipating. General Kilpatrick was in command at James City, and, drawi without embellishment or exaggeration. General Kilpatrick, commanding the Federal cavalry, had beet, a ruse was about to be practised upon General Kilpatrick, who was known to want caution, and thisrt had arranged that he should retire before Kilpatrick as he advanced, until the Federal column was signal for Stuart to face about and attack; Kilpatrick would thus be assailed in front and flank atied out exactly as Stuart had arranged. General Kilpatrick reached Bucklands, and is said to have sng to give him no rest. It is said that General Kilpatrick had scarcely uttered this threat when the subsequently-and the pursuing force, under Kilpatrick, gave Stuart no more trouble as he fell back[1 more...]
n to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. I. General Meade's retreat from Culpeper, in October, 1863,w miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvioce of artillery, I believe, was captured. General Meade had swept clean. There were even very feward Warrenton Springs, still aiming to cut General Meade off from Manassas. On the next day commenosed between the two retreating columns of General Meade-infantry, cavalry, and artillery-and theseoor men, and let us say no more about it. General Meade was behind Bull Run fortifying. Thus trous attempt to bring on a pitched battle with Meade. That was his design, as it was General MeadeGeneral Meade's design in coming over to Mine Run in the succeeding December. Both schemes failed. From the hi. The retreat had been admirably managed. General Meade had carried off everything. We did not cat of rain to make a flank movement against General Meade's right beyond the Little River Turnpike.[9 more...]
d bring on a general engagement between the two armies. The plan was a simple one. Ewell and A. P. Hill were to move out with their corps from the works on the Rapidan, and marching up that stream, places in the abandoned works, and repulse any assault. Once across the Upper Rapidan, Ewell and Hill would move toward Madison Court-House with the rest of Stuart's cavalry on their right flank, to was the morning of the ioth of October when, moving on the right of the long column of Ewell and Hill then streaming toward Madison Court-House, Stuart came on the exterior picket of the enemy-their At dawn Stuart was again in the saddle, pressing forward upon the retiring enemy. Ewell and Hill had moved unseen to their position on the Sperryville road, thanks to the stand of Stuart at Jamehe curiously mingled warp and woof of war. It was the Army of Northern Virginia, led by Ewell and Hill, with General Lee commanding in person, which sustained these losses, and failed in the object wh
e permitted to fall back without molestation, and his command was to be present at the Buckland races. This comic episode will be briefly described, and the event related just as it occurred, without embellishment or exaggeration. General Kilpatrick, commanding the Federal cavalry, had been very much outraged, it would appear, at the hasty manner in which Stuart had compelled him to evacuate Culpeper; and he now felt an ardent desire, before the campaign ended, to give the great cavalier a Roland for his Oliver. With about 3,000 cavalry he accordingly crossed Bull Run, following upon Stuart's track as the latter fell back; and soon he had reached the little village of Bucklands, not far from New Baltimore. Stuart had disappeared; but these disappearances of Stuart, like those of Jackson, were always dangerous. In fact, a ruse was about to be practised upon General Kilpatrick, who was known to want caution, and this ruse was of the simplest description. Stuart had arranged that
Henry E. Peyton (search for this): chapter 2.22
ny battle pictures in this discursive sketch, he omits a detailed account of the hard fight which followed. It was among the heaviest of the war, and for a time nothing was seen but dust, smoke, and confused masses reeling to and fro; nothing was heard but shouts, cheers, yells, and orders, mixed with the quick bang of carbines and the clash of sabres-above all, and the continuous thunder of the artillery. It was as mixed up as any fight of the war, and at one time General Stuart, with Colonel Peyton, of General Lee's staff, and one or two other officers, found himself cut off by the enemy. He got out, joined his column to Fitz Lee's, and charging the Federal forces, cavalry and infantry --the latter being drawn up on Fleetwood Hill-pressed them back to the Rappahannock, which they hastened to cross. General Meade has thus retreated from Culpeper, but it was the cleanest retreat on record, as far as the present writer's observation extended. He imitated it in December at Mine Run
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