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Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Jamestown, Captain Barney, and the Yorktown, Captain Tucker, down from Richmond; while he went out with the Raleigh and Beaufort --two of the smallest class of gunboats, saved by Captain Lynch from Roanoke Island. This combined force-four of the ve another raked the frigate; till, trembling like a cardhouse, she hauled down her colors and raised the white flag. The Beaufort ranged alongside and received the flag of the Congress, and her captain, William R. Smith, and Lieutenant Pendergrast as prisoners of war. These officers left their side-arms on the Beaufort and returned to the Congress; whennotwithstand-ing the white flag — a hot fire was opened from shore upon the Beaufort, and she was compelled to withdraw. Lieutenant Robert MinorBeaufort, and she was compelled to withdraw. Lieutenant Robert Minor was then sent in a boat from the Virginia to fire the frigate; but was badly wounded by a Minie-ball, from under the white flag; and Captain Buchanan was seriously hit in the leg by the same volley. Then it was determined to burn the Congress with
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
tions for the fitting out of privateers. The first venture, the Sumter, was bought, equipped and put into commission at the end of April; than useless gunboats, been put into saucy and swift wasps like the Sumter, their stings must have driven northern commerce from the sea; and a bushwhacker, and Joseph E. Johnston but a guerrilla! When the Sumter began her work, she was soon followed by the Florida --a vessel somition; ag is the later substitution of the Alabama for the worn-out Sumter. During the long war, these three vessels-and but two of them ath railroad iron. There were also two small ones on the stocks at Charleston, and another at Savannah. The great difficulty of procuring propments of the Norfolk Navy Yard; the refuse of the harbor boats of Charleston, New Orleans, Savannah and Mobile to select from; and had, besidenvolved; for though James river, some of the western streams, and Charleston harbor were literally sown with torpedoes, yet only in rare and
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Robert E. Lee a marauder-Wade Hampton but a bushwhacker, and Joseph E. Johnston but a guerrilla! When the Sumter began her work, she was soon followed by the Florida --a vessel somewhat better, but still of the same class. Under the dashing and efficient Maffitt, the Florida, too, wrought daring destruction. Her record, likeFlorida, too, wrought daring destruction. Her record, like that of her rival, is too familiar for repetition; ag is the later substitution of the Alabama for the worn-out Sumter. During the long war, these three vessels-and but two of them at one time — were the only cruisers the Confederacy had afloat; until just before its close, the Shenandoah went out to strike fresh terror to the rate navy. This is the general title of privateer, given to all vessels not cooped up in southern harbors. Regularly-commissioned cruisers, like the Alabama and Florida, the property of the Navy Department, and commanded by its regularly-commissioned officers, were no more privateers than were the Minnesota, or Kearsage. There
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 31
ase. There is no necessity for defense of Captain Semmes' position; but it may be well to record how blind is the hate which still attempts to brand as Pirate a regularly-commissioned officer in service, whose long career gained him nothing but respect under the northern-nothing but glory under the southern flag. If Raphael Semmes be a pirate, then was the northern recognition of belligerents but an active lie! Then was Robert E. Lee a marauder-Wade Hampton but a bushwhacker, and Joseph E. Johnston but a guerrilla! When the Sumter began her work, she was soon followed by the Florida --a vessel somewhat better, but still of the same class. Under the dashing and efficient Maffitt, the Florida, too, wrought daring destruction. Her record, like that of her rival, is too familiar for repetition; ag is the later substitution of the Alabama for the worn-out Sumter. During the long war, these three vessels-and but two of them at one time — were the only cruisers the Confederacy
nel at Newport News, blockading the mouth of James river and cutting off communication from Norfolk. The Congress frigate was lying near her, off the News; while the Minnesota lay below, under the guns of Fortress Monroe. The Ericsson Monitor — the first of her class, and equally an experiment as her rebel rival-had come round a few days before to watch the Virginia, as the new iron-clad was now rechristened. The great ship being ready, Flag-Officer Buchanan ordered the Jamestown, Captain Barney, and the Yorktown, Captain Tucker, down from Richmond; while he went out with the Raleigh and Beaufort --two of the smallest class of gunboats, saved by Captain Lynch from Roanoke Island. This combined force-four of the vessels being frail wooden shells, formerly used as river passenger boats-carried only twenty-seven guns. But Buchanan steamed boldly out, on the morning of the 8th of March, to attack an enemy carrying quite two hundred and twenty of the heaviest guns in the United Sta
Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 31
Mr. Mallory iron-clads vs. cruisers the parole of Pirate Semmes what iron-clads might have done Treasury and Navy the a few weeks she ran out of New Orleans, in command of Raphael Semmes, and the stars and bars were floating solitary, but de held power in 1866. In the January of that year, Raphael Semmes was seized and thrown into prison. He was now chargedxisted! From incontrovertible testimony, we know that Captain Semmes only raised the white flag, after his vessel began to vengeance on a disarmed enemy, raised the absurd plea that Semmes became a prisoner of war by raising the white flag; that bIt would have no doubt been chivalric and beautiful in Raphael Semmes to have drowned in the ocean, because the boat of the f, a release. There is no necessity for defense of Captain Semmes' position; but it may be well to record how blind is torthern-nothing but glory under the southern flag. If Raphael Semmes be a pirate, then was the northern recognition of bell
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 31
act of the Kearsage leaving him to drown was, in itself, a release. There is no necessity for defense of Captain Semmes' position; but it may be well to record how blind is the hate which still attempts to brand as Pirate a regularly-commissioned officer in service, whose long career gained him nothing but respect under the northern-nothing but glory under the southern flag. If Raphael Semmes be a pirate, then was the northern recognition of belligerents but an active lie! Then was Robert E. Lee a marauder-Wade Hampton but a bushwhacker, and Joseph E. Johnston but a guerrilla! When the Sumter began her work, she was soon followed by the Florida --a vessel somewhat better, but still of the same class. Under the dashing and efficient Maffitt, the Florida, too, wrought daring destruction. Her record, like that of her rival, is too familiar for repetition; ag is the later substitution of the Alabama for the worn-out Sumter. During the long war, these three vessels-and but t
he sea; and the United States ports would have been more effectually blockaded, from a thousand miles at sea, than were those of the southern fleet-bound coast. It may not be irrelevant here to allude to the finale of the Confederate cruisers; and to recall the most inane farce of all those enacted by the madmen who held power in 1866. In the January of that year, Raphael Semmes was seized and thrown into prison. He was now charged — not with having violated his parole given to General Grant, who was personally and morally responsible for his persecution — not with doing aught but obeying the laws themselves ; but he was charged with having escaped, the year before, from the custody of a man whose prisoner he was not and had never been — with having broken from a durance that ought to have existed! From incontrovertible testimony, we know that Captain Semmes only raised the white flag, after his vessel began to sink; that he stayed on her deck until she went down beneath hi<
at carried the grave responsibility for loss of that city, and for the far graver disaster of the closing of the whole river and the blockade of the trans-Mississippi. For had the Louisiana been furnished with two companion ships of equal strength-or even had she been completely finished and not had been compelled to succumb to accidents within, while she braved the terrific fire from without — the Federal fleet might have been crushed like egg-shells; the splendid exertions of Hollins and Kennon in the past would not have been nullified; the blood of McIntosh and Huger would not have been useless sacrifice; and the homes of the smiling city and the pure vicinage of her noble daughters might not have been polluted by the presence of the commandant, who crawled in after the victorious fleet. Norfolk, however, had comeinto southern possession, by the secession of Virginia; and the vast resources of her navy-yard-only partly crippled by the haste of the Federal retreat-stimulated th
S. R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 31
Who the southern sailors were regular and provisional Navy-bills popular estimate of Mr. Mallory iron-clads vs. cruisers the parole of Pirate Semmes what iron-clads might have done Treabordinate officers, for shore duty in its work-shops and navy-yards. The acceptability of Mr. Mallory to the people, at the outset of his career, has been noted. They believed that his long expethe counsel and aid of some of the most efficient of the scientific sailors of the Union. Mr. Mallory took charge of the Navy Department in March, 1861. At this time the question of iron-clads hned against. The old adage about giving a bad name, however, was more than illustrated in Mr. Mallory's case. He had no doubt been unfortunate; but that he really was guilty of one-half the erro result of circumstance, every accident, every inefficiency of a subordinate was visited upon Mr. Mallory's head. Public censure always makes the meat it feeds on; and the secretary soon became the
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