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April 25th (search for this): chapter 26
agonist, but did not fall. He attempted to fire again, but the pistol missed fire. Ford's next shot missed D. and wounded a man in Main Street, some seventy paces beyond; but his next fire took effect in Dixon's breast, who fell and expired in a few moments. Many of our people think that because the terms of enlistment of so many in the Federal army will expire next month, we shall not have an active spring campaign. It may be so; but I doubt it. Blood must flow as freely as ever! April 25 We have bad news from the West. The enemy (cavalry, I suppose) have penetrated Mississippi some 200 miles, down to the railroad between Vicksburg and Meridian. This is in the rear and east of Vicksburg, and intercepts supplies They destroyed two trains. This dispatch was sent to the Secretary of War by the President without remark. The Enquirer this morning contained a paragraph stating that Gen. Pemberton was exchanging civilities with Gen. Sherman, and had sent him a beautiful bou
April 24th (search for this): chapter 26
f the war amount now to $60,000,000 per month, or $720,000,000 per annum. This enormous expenditure is owing to the absurd prices charged for supplies by the farmers, to save whose slaves and farms the war is waged, in great part. They are charging the government $20 per hundred weight, or $400 per ton for hay! Well, we shall soon see if they be reluctant to pay the taxes soon to be required of them-one-tenth of all their crops, etc. If they refuse to pay, then what will they deserve? April 24 We lost five fine guns and over a hundred men on the Nansemond; and we learn that more of the enemy's gunboats and transports have passed Vicksburg! These are untoward tidings. Gens. Pemberton and French are severely criticised. We had a tragedy in the street to-day, near the President's office. It appears that Mr. Dixon, Clerk of the House of Representatives, recently dismissed one of his under clerks, named Ford, for reasons which I have not heard ; whereupon the latter notified
April 23rd (search for this): chapter 26
r-superfine, $31 to $32; extra, $34; family, $36; hay is in very small supply-sales at $15 per cwt.; lard, $1.65 to $1.70 per pound ; potatoes-Irish, $3 to $10; sweet, $10 to $11 per bushel; rice, 25 to 33 cents per pound; wheat, $6.50 to $7 per bushel. Groceries.-Sugars have a declining tendency: we quote brown at $1.15 to $1.25; molasses, $9 to $10 per gallon; coffee, $4 to $4.50; salt, 45 cents per pound; whisky, $28 to $35; apple brandy, $24 to $25; French brandy, $65 per gallon. April 23 The President's health is improving. His eye is better; and he would have been in his office to-day (the first time for three weeks) if the weather (raining) had been fine. The expenses of the war amount now to $60,000,000 per month, or $720,000,000 per annum. This enormous expenditure is owing to the absurd prices charged for supplies by the farmers, to save whose slaves and farms the war is waged, in great part. They are charging the government $20 per hundred weight, or $400 pe
April 30th (search for this): chapter 26
as pullets' eggs. The Federal papers have accounts of brilliant successes in Louisiana and Missouri, having taken 1600 prisoners in the former State and defeated Price at Cape Girardeau in the latter. Whether these accounts are authentic or not we have no means of knowing yet. We have nothing further from Mississippi. It is said there is some despondency in Washington. Our people will die in the last ditch rather than be subjugated and see the confiscation of their property. April 30 The enemy are advancing across the Rappahannock, and the heavy skirmishing which precedes a battle has begun. We are sending up troops and supplies with all possible expedition. Decisive events are looked for in a few days. But if all of Longstreet's corps be sent up, we leave the southern approach to the city but weakly defended. Hooker must have overwhelming numbers, else he would not venture to advance in the face of Lee's army! Can he believe the silly tale about our troops bein
April 29th (search for this): chapter 26
h, that this paper came into my hands with fortynine others to-day, at the department, where I shall wholly remain hereafter. The President seemed struck with the idea, and indorsed a reference on it to the State, Treasury, War, and Navy departments, and also to the Attorney General. I shall be curious to know what the Secretary thinks of this plan. No matter what the Secretary of War thinks of it; he declined my plan of deriving supplies directly from the people, and then adopted it. April 29 Gen. Beauregard is eager to have completed the Torpedo ram, building at Charleston, and wants a great gun for it. But the Secretary of the Navy wants all the iron for mailing his gun-boats. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, says the ram will be worth two gun-boats. The President of the Manassas Gap Railroad says his company is bringing all its old iron to the city. Wherefore? The merchants of Mobile are protesting against the impressment by government agents of the sugar and molasses
April 28th (search for this): chapter 26
tations. April 27 A dispatch from Montgomery, Ala., states that the enemy have penetrated as far as Enterprise, Miss., where we had a small body of troops, conscripts. If this be merely a raid, it is an extraordinary one, and I feel some anxiety to learn the conclusion of it. It is hard to suppose a small force of the enemy would evince such temerity. But if it be supported by an army, and the position maintained, Vicksburg is doomed. We shall get no more sugar from Louisiana. April 28 The enemy's raid in Mississippi seems to have terminated at Enterprise, where we collected a force and offered battle, but the invaders retreated. It is said they had 1600 cavalry and 5 guns, and the impression prevails that but few of them will ever return. It is said they sent back a detachment of 200 men some days ago with their booty, watches, spoons, jewelry, etc. rifled from the habitations of the non-combating people. ! saw Brig.-Gen. Chilton to day, Chief of Gen. Lee's Staff.
April 27th (search for this): chapter 26
centum on the prices of merchandise. Some suppose this arrangement has the sanction of certain members of our government. The plausibility of this scheme (if it really exists) is the fact that steamers having munitions of war rarely get through the blockading fleet without trouble, while those having only merchandise arrive in safety almost daily. Gen. D. Green intimates that Mr. Memminger, and Frazer & Co., Charleston, are personally interested in the profits of heavy importations. April 27 A dispatch from Montgomery, Ala., states that the enemy have penetrated as far as Enterprise, Miss., where we had a small body of troops, conscripts. If this be merely a raid, it is an extraordinary one, and I feel some anxiety to learn the conclusion of it. It is hard to suppose a small force of the enemy would evince such temerity. But if it be supported by an army, and the position maintained, Vicksburg is doomed. We shall get no more sugar from Louisiana. April 28 The enemy'
k. the President's well eye said to be failing. a reconnoissance! we are planting much grain. picking up pins. beautiful season. Gen. Johnston in Tennessee. Longstreet's successes in that State. Lee complains that his army is not fed. we fear for Vicksburg now. enemy giving up plunder in Mississippi. Beauregard is busy at Charleston. Gen. Marshall, of Kentucky, fails to get stock and hogs. Gen. Lee calls for Longstreet's corps. the enemy demonstrating on the Rappahannock. April 1 It is said we have taken Washington, a village in North Carolina. And it is represented that large supplies of meat, etc. can be taken from thence and the adjacent counties. Every day we look for important intelligence from Charleston, and from the West. Mr. Seddon, the Secretary of War, has receded from his position in regard to resident aliens. April 2 This morning early a few hundred women and boys met as by concert in the Capitol Square, saying they were hungry, and mu
ucky, fails to get stock and hogs. Gen. Lee calls for Longstreet's corps. the enemy demonstrating on the Rappahannock. April 1 It is said we have taken Washington, a village in North Carolina. And it is represented that large supplies of meat, etc. can be taken from thence and the adjacent counties. Every day we look for important intelligence from Charleston, and from the West. Mr. Seddon, the Secretary of War, has receded from his position in regard to resident aliens. April 2 This morning early a few hundred women and boys met as by concert in the Capitol Square, saying they were hungry, and must have food. The number continued to swell until there were more than a thousand. But few men were among them, and these were mostly foreign residents, with exemptions in their pockets. About nine A. M. the mob emerged from the western gates of the square, and proceeded down Ninth Street, passing the War Department, and crossing Main Street, increasing in magnitude
he instrumentality of emissaries. Some of the women, and others, have been arrested. We have news of the capture of another of the enemy's gunboats, in Berwick Bay, Louisiana, with five guns. It is said to have been done by cavalry. A dispatch just received from Charleston states that the enemy's monitors were approaching the forts, seven in number, and that the attack was commencing. This isjoyful news to our people, so confident are they that Gen. Beauregard will beat them. April 5 Snow fell all night, and a depth of several inches covers the earth this morning. It will soon melt, however, as it is now raining. The Northern invaders who anticipate a pleasant sojourn during the winter and spring in this climate, have been very disagreeably disappointed in these expectations. A surgeon was arrested yesterday for saying there was a power behind the throne greater than the throne. Upon being asked by the mayor what power he alluded to, he answered the people. H
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