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Fernando Wood (search for this): chapter 26
down and pick up any found in the street. The boarding-houses are breaking up, and rooms, furnished and, unfurnished, are rented out to messes. One dollar and fifty cents for beef, leaves no margin for profit, even at $100 per month, which is charged for board, and most of the boarders cannot afford to pay that price. Therefore they take rooms, and buy their own scanty food. I am inclined to think provisions would not be deficient, to an alarming extent, if they were equally distributed. Wood is no scarcer than before the war, and yet $30 per load (less than a cord) is demanded for it, and obtained. The other day Wilmington might have been taken, for the troops were sent to Beauregard. Their places have since been filled by a brigade from Longstreet. It is a monstrous undertaking to attempt to subjugate so vast a country as this, even with its disparity of population. We have superior facilities for concentration, while the invader must occupy, or penetrate the outer lines
William Porcher Miles (search for this): chapter 26
the State, Treasury, War, and Navy departments, and also to the Attorney General. I shall be curious to know what the Secretary thinks of this plan. No matter what the Secretary of War thinks of it; he declined my plan of deriving supplies directly from the people, and then adopted it. April 29 Gen. Beauregard is eager to have completed the Torpedo ram, building at Charleston, and wants a great gun for it. But the Secretary of the Navy wants all the iron for mailing his gun-boats. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, says the ram will be worth two gun-boats. The President of the Manassas Gap Railroad says his company is bringing all its old iron to the city. Wherefore? The merchants of Mobile are protesting against the impressment by government agents of the sugar and molasses in the city. They say this conduct will double the prices. So Congress did not and cannot restrain the military authorities. Gen. Humphrey Marshall met with no success in Kentucky. He writes that
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 26
depots of provisions near the Rappahannock. Beauregard ready to defend Charleston. he has rebuffedw. enemy giving up plunder in Mississippi. Beauregard is busy at Charleston. Gen. Marshall, of Keto our people, so confident are they that Gen. Beauregard will beat them. April 5 Snow fell a were in readiness to begin the attack. And Beauregard was prepared to receive it. To-morrow we shaws from Charleston. Success there will make Beauregard the most popular man in the Confederacy, Leeteeth of published orders. April 11 Gen. Beauregard telegraphs that Gen. Walker has destroyedhave been taken, for the troops were sent to Beauregard. Their places have since been filled by a bated in a few brief hours, under the fire of Beauregard's batteries. They complain that England furkely to be benefited as any one else. Gen. Beauregard is urging the government to send more heaople, and then adopted it. April 29 Gen. Beauregard is eager to have completed the Torpedo ra
Virginians (search for this): chapter 26
the West. Night before last another riot was looked for in this city by the mayor, and two battalions of Gen. Elzey's troops were ordered into the city. If the President could only see the necessity of placing this city under the command of a native Southern general, he might avoid much obloquy. The Smiths, Winders, and Elzeys, who are really foreigners, since the men from their States are not liable to conscription (vide Judge Campbell's decision), are very obnoxious to the people. Virginians can never be reconciled to the presence of a mercenary Swiss guard, and will not submit to imported masters. Notwithstanding the Enquirer urges it, and Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, persistently advocates it, Congress still refuses to confer additional powers on the President. Twice, within the last week, Congress has voted down the proposition to clothe the President with power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Congress has likewise refused to reconsider the vote postponing the
is in violation of an act of Congress, and general orders. It appears that grave judges are not all inflexibly just, and immaculately legal in their decisions. Col. Lay ordered the commandant of conscripts (Col. Shields) to give the man a protection, without any reason therefor. It is now said large depots of provisions are apture of Charleston, and gold declined heavily. This report was circulated by some of the government officials, at Washington, for purposes of speculation. Col. Lay announced, to-day, that he had authority (oral) from Gen. Cooper, A. and I. G., to accept Marylanders as substitutes. Soon after he ordered in two, in place ofight altogether. But he works on; and few or no visitors are admitted. He remains at his dwelling, and has not been in the executive office these ten days. Col. Lay was merry again to-day. He ordered in another foreign substitute (in North Carolina). Pins are so scarce and costly, that it is now a pretty general practic
nor even feel a scarcity of provisions in future. We shall be cutting wheat in another month in Alabama and other States. Among the other rumors, it is said Hooker is falling back toward Washington, but these are merely rumors. The President is in a very feeble and nervous condition, and is really threatened with the los It was a Federal account of the retaking the Queen of the West, reported by Mr. Benjamin; and hence, it is not generally believed. It is thought by many that Hooker will change his base from the Rappahannock to the Pamunky, embarking his army in transports. If this be so, we shall again have the pleasure of hearing the thundion. Decisive events are looked for in a few days. But if all of Longstreet's corps be sent up, we leave the southern approach to the city but weakly defended. Hooker must have overwhelming numbers, else he would not venture to advance in the face of Lee's army! Can he believe the silly tale about our troops being sent from Vi
J. H. Winder (search for this): chapter 26
e evil of scarcity. I mean those who have allowed transportation to forestallers and extortioners. Gen. Elzey and Gen. Winder waited upon the Secretary of War in the morning, asking permission to call the troops from the camps near the city, tonying the authority of the government to declare martial law, such as existed in this city under the administration of Gen. Winder. It was a great blunder, and alienated thousands. We have a seasonable rain to-day. April 16 The Federal pawn knowledge, that an innocent man had been confined in prison nearly two years, in consequence of a mistake of one of Gen. Winder's subordinates in writing his name, which was Simons; he wrote it Simmons! April 20 We have nothing definite froand he responded in the affirmative. I am glad the Secretary of War has stopped the blockaderun-ning operations of Gen. Winder and Judge Campbell, Assistant Secretary of War. Until to-day, Gen. W. issued many passports which were invariably app
E. Barksdale (search for this): chapter 26
ident could only see the necessity of placing this city under the command of a native Southern general, he might avoid much obloquy. The Smiths, Winders, and Elzeys, who are really foreigners, since the men from their States are not liable to conscription (vide Judge Campbell's decision), are very obnoxious to the people. Virginians can never be reconciled to the presence of a mercenary Swiss guard, and will not submit to imported masters. Notwithstanding the Enquirer urges it, and Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, persistently advocates it, Congress still refuses to confer additional powers on the President. Twice, within the last week, Congress has voted down the proposition to clothe the President with power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Congress has likewise refused to reconsider the vote postponing the consideration of the bill to create a Court of Claims. Judge S--was here, working for it; but was doomed to disappointment. A few nights since a full Federal band c
John Mitchel (search for this): chapter 26
ast Saturday. He says Senators, on the most urgent public business, are subjected to the necessity of writing their names on a slate, and then awaiting the pleasure of some lackey for permission to enter the Secretary's office. He was quite severe in his remarks, and moved a call on the President for certain information he desired. The Sentinel abuses Congress for differing with the President in regard to the retention of diplomatic agents in London, etc. And the Enquirer, edited by John Mitchel, the fugitive Irishman, opens its batteries on the Sentinel. So we go. April 14 We have nothing additional from Gen. Wise's expedition against Williamsburg; but it was deprecated by our people here, whose families and negroes have been left in that vicinity. They argue that we cannot hold the town, or any portion of the Peninsula in the neighborhood; and when the troops retire, the enemy will subject the women and children to more rigorous treatment, and take all the slaves. We
ood must flow as freely as ever! April 25 We have bad news from the West. The enemy (cavalry, I suppose) have penetrated Mississippi some 200 miles, down to the railroad between Vicksburg and Meridian. This is in the rear and east of Vicksburg, and intercepts supplies They destroyed two trains. This dispatch was sent to the Secretary of War by the President without remark. The Enquirer this morning contained a paragraph stating that Gen. Pemberton was exchanging civilities with Gen. Sherman, and had sent him a beautiful bouquet! Did he have any conception of the surprise the enemy was executing at the moment? Well, Mississippi is the President's State, and if he is satisfied with Northern generals to defend it, he is as likely to be benefited as any one else. Gen. Beauregard is urging the government to send more heavy guns to Savannah. ! saw an officer to-day just from Charleston. He says none of the enemy's vessels came nearer than 900 yards of our batteries, and tha
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