hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
R. E. Lee 809 13 Browse Search
United States (United States) 780 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 562 2 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 448 0 Browse Search
Grant 434 30 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 410 4 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 402 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 390 2 Browse Search
Custis Lee 390 6 Browse Search
J. H. Winder 352 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. Search the whole document.

Found 377 total hits in 151 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
C. C. Thayer (search for this): chapter 37
something of a dislike of him. And yet Beauregard was wrong to make any stir about it; and the President himself only acted in accordance with Gen. Lee's suggestions, noted at the time in this Diary. Gen. Polk writes from Dunapolis that he will have communications with Jackson restored in a few days, and that the injury to the railroads was not so great as the enemy represented. Mr. Memminger, the Secretary of the Treasury, is in a black Dutch fury. It appears that his agent, C. C. Thayer, with $15,000,000 Treasury notes for disbursement in Texas, arrived at the mouth of the Rio Grande in December, when the enemy had possession of Brownsville, and when Matamoras was in revolution. He then conferred with Mr. Benjamin's friend (and Confederate States secret agent) Mr. Quintero, and Quartermaster Russell, who advised him to deposit the treasure with P. Milmo & Co.--a house with which our agents have had large transactions, and Mr. M. being son-in-law to Gov. Vidurri--to be s
louds and sunshine during the day. One of the clerks who was in the engagement, Tuesday night, March 1st, informed me that the enemy's cavalry approached slowly up the hill, on the crest of which the battalion was lying. At the word, the boys rose and fired on their knees. He says the enemy delivered a volley before they retreated, killing two of our men and wounding several. Reports from the Eastern Shore of Virginia indicate that Gen. Butler's rule there has been even worse than Lockwood's. It is said that the subordinate officers on that quiet peninsula are merely his agents, to tax and fine and plunder the unoffending people,never in arms, and who have, with few exceptions, taken the oath repeatedly. One family, however (four sisters, the Misses P.), relatives of my wife, have not yielded. They allege that their father and oldest sister were persecuted to death by the orders of the general, and they could not swear allegiance to any government sanctioning such outrages
Treasury, and that reflex of the financial tide may produce salutary results a few weeks hence. March 10 Raining fast all day. There was a rumor to-day that the enemy were approaching again, but the Secretary knew nothing of it. Major Griswold is at variance with Gen. Winder, who has relieved him as Provost Marshal, and ordered him to Americus, Ga., to be second in command of the prisons, and assigned Major Carrington to duty as Provost Marshal here. Major Griswold makes a pathetiMajor Griswold makes a pathetic appeal to the President to be allowed to stay here in his old office. The following, from the Dispatch, differs from the Examiner's account of the disposal of Col. Dahlgren's body: Col. Dahlgren's body. On Sunday afternoon last, the body of Col. Ulric Dahlgren, one of the leaders of the late Yankee raid on this city, and on whose body the paper revealing their designs, if successful, were found, was brought to this city on the York River Railroad train, and remained in the car (
er Johnston or Longstreet. He (Gen. Lee) says, however, that the 4th and 11th corps are small, and may have been consolidated; the 23d also is small; but he does not know the strength of the enemy. He thinks Pickett's Division should be sent as desired, and its place filled with troops from South Carolina, etc., where operations will probably soon cease. The Secretary sent this to the President. The President sent it back to day, indorsed, How can Pickett's division be replaced?-J. D. Henly's Battalion returned this evening; and Custis can resume his school, unless he should be among the list doomed to the rank in the field, for which he is physically incapable, as Surgeon Garnett, the President's physician, has certified. March 5 Clear and pleasant, after a slight shower in the morning. The raid is considered at an end, and it has ended disastrously for the invaders. Some extraordinary memoranda were captured from the raiders, showing a diabolical purpose, and cr
colonel Dahlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army. destitution of my family. protest from South Carolina. difficulty with P. Milmo & Co. Hon. J. W. Wall. March 1 Dark and raining. As the morning progressed, the city was a little startled by the sound of artillery in a northern dir conferred with Mr. Benjamin's friend (and Confederate States secret agent) Mr. Quintero, and Quartermaster Russell, who advised him to deposit the treasure with P. Milmo & Co.--a house with which our agents have had large transactions, and Mr. M. being son-in-law to Gov. Vidurri--to be shipped to Eagle Pass via Monterey to San Antonio, etc. But alas! and alas! P. Milmo & Co., upon being informed that fifteen millions were in their custody, notified our agents that they would seize it all, and hold it all, until certain alleged claims they held against the Confederate States Government were paid. Mr. Quintero, who sends this precious intelligence, s
XXXVI. march, 1864 Attempt to capture Richmond. Governor Vance and Judge Pearson preparations to blow up the Libby prisoners. letter from General Lee. proposal to execute Dahlgren's raiders. General Butler on the Eastern Shore. colonel Dahlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army. destitution of my family. protest from South Carolina. difficulty with P. Milmo & Co. Hon. J. W. Wall. March 1 Dark and raining. As the morning progressed, the city was a little startled by the sound of artillery in a northern direction, and not very distant. Couriers and horsemen from the country announced the approach of the enemy within the outer fortifications; a column of 5000 cavalry. Then Hon. James Lyons came in, reporting that the enemy were shelling his house, one and a half miles from the city. And Gen. Elzey (in command) said, at the department, that a fight was in progress; and that Brig.-Gen. Custis Lee was directing it in per
Z. B. Vance (search for this): chapter 37
XXXVI. march, 1864 Attempt to capture Richmond. Governor Vance and Judge Pearson preparations to blow up the Libby prisoners. letter from General Lee. proposal to execute Dahlgren's raiders. General Butler on the Eastern Shore. colonel Dahlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army To-day Gen. Hampton sent in 77 prisoners, taken six miles above town-one lieutenant-colonel among them; and Yankee horses, etc. are coming in every hour. Gov. Vance writes that inasmuch as Judge Pearson still grants the writ of habeas corpus, and discharges all who have put substitutes in the army, on the ground of the uncodepartments, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, are to be enrolled, and perhaps the greater number will be detailed to their present employments. Gov. Vance is here, and the President is about to appoint some of his friends brigadiers, which is conciliatory. Gen. Longstreet has written a letter to the President,
William Porcher Miles (search for this): chapter 37
eater number will be detailed to their present employments. Gov. Vance is here, and the President is about to appoint some of his friends brigadiers, which is conciliatory. Gen. Longstreet has written a letter to the President, which I have not seen. The President sent it to the Secretary to-day, marked confidential. It must relate either to subsistence or to important movements in meditation. If the latter, we shall soon know it. March 25 Raining moderately. Yesterday Mr. Miles, member of Congress from South Carolina, received a dispatch from Charleston, signed by many of the leading citizens, protesting against the removal of 52 companies of cavalry from that department to Virginia. They say so few will be left that the railroads, plantations, and even the City of Charleston will be exposed to the easy capture of the enemy; and this is approved and signed by T. Jordan, Chief of Staff. It was given to the Secretary of War, who sent it to Gen. Bragg, assuring hi
Willoughby Newton (search for this): chapter 37
r. He says the disaster at Vicksburg was owing to Gen. Pemberton's disobedience of orders. He was ordered to concentrate his army and give battle before the place was invested, and under no circumstances to allow himself to be besieged, which must of course result in disaster. He says, also, that he was about to manceuvre in such manner as would have probably resulted in the saving a large proportion of his men, when, to his astonishment, he learned that Gen. P. had capitulated. Willoughby Newton reports that the enemy are building a number of light boats, to be worked with muffled oars, at Point Lookout, Md., and suggests that they may be designed to pass the obstructions in the James River, in another attempt to capture Richmond. It is said Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith, trans-Mississippi, has been made a full general, and that Major-Gen. Sterling Price relieves Lieut.-Gen. Holmes, who is to report at Richmond. If this be so, it is very good policy. Gen. Lee is still he
James Lyons (search for this): chapter 37
hlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army. destitution of my family. protest from South Carolina. difficulty with P. Milmo & Co. Hon. J. W. Wall. March 1 Dark and raining. As the morning progressed, the city was a little startled by the sound of artillery in a northern direction, and not very distant. Couriers and horsemen from the country announced the approach of the enemy within the outer fortifications; a column of 5000 cavalry. Then Hon. James Lyons came in, reporting that the enemy were shelling his house, one and a half miles from the city. And Gen. Elzey (in command) said, at the department, that a fight was in progress; and that Brig.-Gen. Custis Lee was directing it in person. But an hour or so after the report of artillery ceased, and the excitement died away. Yet the local troops and militia are marching out as I write; and a caisson that came in an hour ago has just passed our door, returning to the field. Of course the
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...