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Peter C. Hains (search for this): chapter 18
e advanced, and Tidball's battery, by piece, using canister, to drive back the Confederate sharp-shooters. The Fifth Corps (General Porter's) was ordered to be ready for like service. When Richardson swung his line up along the crest at the Piper House, Pleasonton advanced troopers and batteries, crossed the bridge at a gallop by the Fifth Regular Cavalry, Farnsworth's brigade, Rush's brigade, two regiments of the Fifth Brigade under B. F. Davis, and the batteries of Tidball, Robertson, Hains, and Gibson. The batteries were put into action under the line of skirmishers, that were reinforced by Sykes's division of the Fifth and Tenth Infantry under Lieutenant Poland. General Hill seized a musket and by example speedily collected a number of men, who joined him in reinforcing the line threatened by this heavy display. The parts of brigades under General Pryor, Colonels Cummings, Posey, and G. T. Anderson afterwards got up to help the brigade of Evans already there. By these
J. G. Walker (search for this): chapter 18
among the fallen early in the day McLaws and Walker in time to meet Sumner's advance under SedgwicG. Walker coming up took place on Hood's left, Walker leaving two regiments to fill a vacant place boops engaged suffered proportionally. Hood's, Walker's, and G. T. Anderson's, though longer engagede. Early's regiments were in the wood between Walker and the cavalry, and the detachments under Colesh supply of ammunition, leaving the guard to Walker's two brigades, G. T. Anderson's brigade on WaWalker's right, part of Early's brigade on Walker's left, and the regiments under Colonels Grigsby andWalker's left, and the regiments under Colonels Grigsby and Stafford off the left front. McLaws's division was called for, and on the march under conduct of Mfollowed by the other brigades. McLaws and Walker, pushing their success, were joined by G. T. A guns; McLaws's division and the other part of Walker's were in front of threatenings of parts of Fr. During the lull, after the rencounter of Walker's, Hill's, and Hood's divisions against Mansfi[4 more...]
Harry T. Hays (search for this): chapter 18
o a point on the Hagerstown road about three-quarters of a mile north of the battle-ground, where General Doubleday established his thirty-gun battery. Jackson's and Hooker's men had fought to exhaustion, and the battle of the Twelfth Corps, taken up and continued by Mansfield, had taken defensive relations, its chief mortally wounded. Generals Lawton, Ripley, and J. R. Jones were severely wounded, and Colonel Douglas, commanding Lawton's brigade, killed. A third of the men of Lawton's, Hays's, and Trimble's brigades were reported killed or wounded. Four of the field officers of Colquitt's brigade were killed, five were wounded, the tenth and last contused by a shell. All of Jackson's and D. H. Hill's troops engaged suffered proportionally. Hood's, Walker's, and G. T. Anderson's, though longer engaged, did not lose so severely. General Hooker's aggregate of loss was 2590; General Mansfield's, 1746. The Federal batteries, of position, on the east side were more or less
s offensive and defensive the artillery battalions under Lieutenant-Colonel S. D. Lee and Major Frobel were in active combat, the former from ies. McLaws's column came up at nine o'clock. He reported at General Lee's Headquarters, where he was ordered at rest, and afterwards reported to me, with General Lee's orders for his own division, and asked the disposition to be made of R. H. Anderson's. He was ordered to sendof the Antietam. After this fight the artillery battalions of S. D. Lee and Frobel, quite out of ammunition, retired to replenish. The br line was throbbing at every point, so that I dared not call on General Lee for help. Sergeant Ellis thought that he could bring up ammunitnd Burnside's fronts, as soon as they could rise to the plateau. S. D. Lee's batteries were back on the crest, replenished of ammunition, wh's, Hill's, and Hood's divisions against Mansfield's last fight, General Lee and myself, riding together under the crest of General D. H. Hil
Richard H. Rush (search for this): chapter 18
o enter the battle as soon as the attack by Richardson should open the way. To meet these orders skirmishers were advanced, and Tidball's battery, by piece, using canister, to drive back the Confederate sharp-shooters. The Fifth Corps (General Porter's) was ordered to be ready for like service. When Richardson swung his line up along the crest at the Piper House, Pleasonton advanced troopers and batteries, crossed the bridge at a gallop by the Fifth Regular Cavalry, Farnsworth's brigade, Rush's brigade, two regiments of the Fifth Brigade under B. F. Davis, and the batteries of Tidball, Robertson, Hains, and Gibson. The batteries were put into action under the line of skirmishers, that were reinforced by Sykes's division of the Fifth and Tenth Infantry under Lieutenant Poland. General Hill seized a musket and by example speedily collected a number of men, who joined him in reinforcing the line threatened by this heavy display. The parts of brigades under General Pryor, Colon
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 18
Gettysburg, exceeding it in number of killed and wounded, but each of these dragged its tragedy through several days. Taking Confederate losses in killed and wounded as the criterion of magnitude in battles, the Seven Days Battle (following McClellan's retreat), Gettysburg, and Chickamauga exceeded Sharpsburg, but each of these occupied several days, and on no single day in any one of them was there such carnage as in this fierce struggle. The Confederates lost in killed and wounded in sed of his new authority, the brigades assembled at points most suited to their convenience, in rear of D. H. Hill's brigades. But time was up. Confederate affairs were not encouraging. Our men were all leg-weary and heavy to handle, while McClellan, with his tens of thousands, whom he had marched in healthful exercise the past two weeks, was finding and pounding us from left to right under converging fire of his batteries east and west of the Antietam. The signal of the approaching st
R. E. Rodes (search for this): chapter 18
the chapel, where Early's regiments had formed a rallying line. When Hill's right was struck and pressed so severely, Rodes's brigade, the reserve of his division, was ordered out to support his right. The brigade advanced in good strong battle, but General Rodes reported that he could not move his Sixth Alabama Regiment in time, notwithstanding his personal efforts; that with the support of that regiment the battle line of the Confederates could have waited other supports. General Sune section, that short of ammunition and working hands. General Hill rallied the greater part of G. B. Anderson's and Rodes's brigades in the sunken road. Some of Ripley's men came together near Miller's guns at the Hagerstown pike. General R. ved the severe attack in firm holding for a long half-hour, the enemy pressing closer at intervals, until an order of General Rodes's was misconstrued and part of his brigade under Lieutenant- Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama Regiment, was fo
Paul J. Semmes (search for this): chapter 18
ield's command. In the mean time General Mansfield had been killed, and a portion of his corps (formerly Banks's) had also been thrown into confusion. Report of Committee, part i. p. 368. He passed Greene's brigade of the Twelfth, and marched through the wood, leaving the Dunker chapel on his left. As McLaws approached, General Hood was sent to give him careful instructions of the posture, of the grounds, and the impending crisis. He marched with his brigades, --Cobb's, Kershaw's, Semmes's, and Barksdale's. The leading brigade filed to the right, before the approaching march. Kershaw's leading regiment filed into line as Sedgwick's column approached the south side of the Dunker chapel wood,--the latter on a diagonal march,while Kershaw's regiment was in fair front against it. Relative positions of McLaws and other Confederates and Sedgwick at their opening. The regiment opened prompt fire, and the other regiments came into line in double time, opening fire by company as
Holzburton (search for this): chapter 18
ort of the gun all eyes were turned to see the occasion of it, and then to observe the object, when the shell was seen to explode as if in the hands of the officer. It had been dropped squarely upon the drawing-table, and Lieutenant Wagner was mortally wounded. Of this shot, Captain A. B. More, of Richmond, Virginia, wrote, under date of June 16, 1886,-- The Howitzers have always been proud of that shot, and, thinking it would interest you, I write to say that it was fired by Corporal Holzburton, of the Second Company, Richmond Howitzers, from a ten-pound Parrott. Of the first shot, Major Alfred A. Woodhull, under date of June 8, 1886, wrote,--On the 17th of September, 1862, I was standing in Weed's battery, whose position is correctly given in the map, when a man on, I think, a gray horse, appeared about a mile in front of us, and footmen were recognized near. Captain Weed, who was a remarkable artillerist, himself sighted and fired the gun at the horse, which was struck.
John W. Fairfax (search for this): chapter 18
to retire to save itself, and as Barlow came upon our centre, the battery on our left was for a time thrown out of fire lest they might injure friend as much as foe. Barlow marched in steady good ranks, and the remnants before him rose to the emergency. They seemed to forget that they had known fatigue; the guns were played with life, and the brave spirits manning them claimed that they were there to hold or to go down with the guns. As our shots rattled against the armored ranks, Colonel Fairfax clapped his hands and ran for other charges. The mood of the gunners to a man was one of quiet but unflinching resolve to stand to the last gun. Captain Miller charged and double-charged with spherical case and canister until his guns at the discharge leaped in the air from ten to twelve inches. When the crest was reached, the rush that was expected to sweep us away paused,--the Confederates became hopeful. Soon the advancing ranks lay behind the crest, and presently drew nearer
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