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James M. Goggin (search for this): chapter 20
r of his brigades into action not far from where we had burned the house to dislodge the skirmishers. Keitt's men gave ground, and in attempting to rally them their colonel fell mortally wounded. Thereupon the regiment went to pieces in abject rout and threatened to overwhelm the rest of the brigade. I have never seen any body of troops in such a condition of utter demoralization; they actually groveled upon the ground and attempted to burrow under each other in holes and depressions. Major Goggin, the stalwart adjutant-general of the division, was attempting to rally them, and I did what I could to help him. It was of no avail. We actually spurred our horses upon them, and seemed to hear their very bones crack, but it did no good; if compelled to wriggle out of one hole they wriggled into another. So far as I recollect, however, this affair was of no real significance. Our other troops stood firm, and we lost no ground. I think none of the guns of the battery were engaged.
l back on my reserves, in pretty fair order, but slightly demoralized. My reserves were the officers and men of the battalion, all of whom I think were fond of me. If I mistake not, Frazier's battery led the column. I am certain it did a little later. Calloway, its commanding officer, to whom we have already been introduced, was one of the very best of soldiers, as the reader will soon be prepared to admit. He was the first man I fell in with as I fell back, Colonel Cabell and little Barrett, his courier, being ahead of the column. Calloway asked me if I didn't think we were running some risk, entirely unsupported as we seemed to be, and outside our lines. I told him what had occurred, and he smiled grimly. Then I fell back further to the old battery. The column was pretty well closed up that morning; everybody seemed to feel it well to be so. I was strongly attached to the old company and particularly to the captain, who was a magnificent fellow. It was early on a beau
Robert Falligant (search for this): chapter 20
n of his command splendid services of Lieut. Robt. Falligant, of Georgia, with a single gun hot firidges and getting ready June 2d removal of Falligant's lone gun at night. After feeling our lid opened fire on the right flank, and all of Falligant's horses fell at the first volley. The enemade did not, however, advance one foot after Falligant's horses were shot; but it was already consi of June, when it was moved back, every time Falligant's gun fired while I was at headquarters, Gethen he would express his determination that Falligant's gallantry and services should receive theirshaw's old brigade, one of those supporting Falligant's gun, came in, reporting that his part of tttle work, under the mouth of the piece, and Falligant kneeled by him and pressed his finger where on, to bridge two or three ravines, to visit Falligant's gun several times and to keep it supplied en heard him call, in a low tone, Falligant, Falligant! Then I heard the sort of groan or grumble [5 more...]
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (search for this): chapter 20
another. So far as I recollect, however, this affair was of no real significance. Our other troops stood firm, and we lost no ground. I think none of the guns of the battery were engaged. Meanwhile the three divisions of our corps-the First, since Longstreet's wounding, under command of Major-General R. H. Anderson-had settled into alignment in the following order, beginning from the left: Field, Pickett, Kershaw. On the right of Kershaw's was Hoke's division, which had been under Beauregard and had joined the Army of Northern Virginia only the night before. The ground upon which our troops had thus felt and fought their way into line was the historic field of Cold Harbor, and the day was the first of June, 1864. In the afternoon a furious attack was made on the left of Hoke and right of Kershaw; and Clingman's, the left brigade of Hoke and Wofford's, the right brigade of Kershaw gave way, and the Federal troops poured into the gap over a marshy piece of ground which had
Walter Herron Taylor (search for this): chapter 20
e, seeing the respective commanding officers in person. On the first round I did not find General Lee at his quarters, and was told that he had ridden down the road to the lines. When I reached the lines I heard he had passed out in front. Following him up, I found him in the rain with a single piece of horse artillery, feeling the enemy. My second ride was made largely at night, and, as I remember, every officer I desired to see was asleep, except at Army Headquarters, where I found Colonel Taylor in his tent on his knees, with his prayer-book open before him, and General Lee in his tent, wide-awake, poring over a map stretched upon a temporary table of rough plank, with a tallow candle stuck in a bottle for a light. I remember saying to myself, as I delivered my message and withdrew, Does he never, never sleep? Again General Grant slid to the east, and we moved off upon a parallel line. I think it was during this detour-or it may have been an earlier or a later one--that I w
Daniel Stephens McCarthy (search for this): chapter 20
him what had occurred, and he smiled grimly. Then I fell back further to the old battery. The column was pretty well closed up that morning; everybody seemed to feel it well to be so. I was strongly attached to the old company and particularly to the captain, who was a magnificent fellow. It was early on a beautiful spring morning, and we were again passing through a tract of undesolated, undesecrated country-greenness, quiet, the song of birds, the scent of flowers, all about us. Captain McCarthy was on foot, walking among his men, his great arms frequently around the necks of two of them at once — a position which displayed his martial, manly figure to great advantage. I dismounted, one of the fellows mounting my horse, and walked and talked and chatted with the men, and particularly with the captain. He was altogether an uncommon person, marked by great simplicity, sincerity, kindliness, courage, good sense, personal force, and a genius for commanding men. He had been rat
William Tatum Wofford (search for this): chapter 20
t of Kershaw; and Clingman's, the left brigade of Hoke and Wofford's, the right brigade of Kershaw gave way, and the Federal lost, and our lines were left in very bad shape. While Wofford was bending back the right of his line to connect with Hoks were shot; but it was already considerably in advance of Wofford's left, with which it was not connected at all, until the s taken in reaching the gun — that is, we went down behind Wofford's left flank, and from that point ran across a field coverThis route afforded the best protection, but after we left Wofford's position the protection amounted to nothing. The sharpsr the little bridge, and were just passing out from behind Wofford's left flank and heading for Kershaw's line, when someone ome conviction and I felt sure I was talking with General Wofford. He positively forbade the attempt, and did not seem disper us almost noiselessly, along the sassafras field toward Wofford's line. In a few moments we reached the goal, returning o
tured the piece, but they did not relish coming out into the open. I was struck with the splendid fighting spirit of Campbell, the tall, lean, keen-eyed, black-haired gunner of the piece; but he was entirely too reckless, standing erect except whld do so for a moment, but spring up again when the gun fired. Suddenly I heard the thud of a minie striking a man, and Campbell's arms flew up as he fell backward, ejaculating, Oh, God! I'm done forever! We lifted the poor fellow around, across t the blood was spouting, while I took the gunner's place at the trail. Every time the gun was discharged I noticed how Campbell's face — which was almost directly under the bellowing muzzle — was contorted, but he urged me to keep up the fire, untifety-kitchen. The man's back was turned toward us, his elbows were on his knees, and his head sunk in his hands. After Campbell's death, as he was still sitting there, thinking he must be wounded, I proposed to one of the men to run out and bring h
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 20
with my friend and commander, and I assured him I would not obtrude my advice again. I reined in my horse, waiting for Calloway, and rode with him at the head of his battery. I had scarcely joined him, when Colonels Fairfax and Latrobe, of Longstreet's staff, and Captain Simonton, of Pickett's, dashed by, splendidly mounted, and disappeared in a body of woods but a few hundred yards ahead. Hardly had they done so, when pop! pop! pop! went a half dozen carbines and revolvers; and a moment So far as I recollect, however, this affair was of no real significance. Our other troops stood firm, and we lost no ground. I think none of the guns of the battery were engaged. Meanwhile the three divisions of our corps-the First, since Longstreet's wounding, under command of Major-General R. H. Anderson-had settled into alignment in the following order, beginning from the left: Field, Pickett, Kershaw. On the right of Kershaw's was Hoke's division, which had been under Beauregard and h
Edward Stiles (search for this): chapter 20
him and suggested whether there was not danger in our proceeding as we were, a battalion of artillery unaccompanied by infantry, out and beyond the last picket post. The colonel was a strict constructionist, and he shut me up at once by saying: Stiles, that is the responsibility of the general officer who sent me my orders. I am ordered to Beulah Church and to Beulah Church I am going. This is the nearest road. I looked up at him in some little surprise, but said no more; having fired, I nopurpose of hauling it off. I could see nothing, but by this time my suspicion had become conviction and I felt sure I was talking with General Wofford. He positively forbade the attempt, and did not seem disposed to yield until my cousin, Col. Edward Stiles, of the Sixteenth Georgia, of-his brigade, who knew the General well, joined us and suggested as a compromise that we should make the attempt without taking the horses any further; to which I agreed, upon condition that he would furnish me
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