hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 147 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 136 0 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 118 0 Browse Search
Jubal Early 118 0 Browse Search
Custis Lee 111 7 Browse Search
Robert Lee 100 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 83 5 Browse Search
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) 80 0 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 80 0 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert. Search the whole document.

Found 175 total hits in 56 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Winfield Scott Hancock (search for this): chapter 21
n the moral plane. Its most deadly and disastrous effect is wrought by the destruction of confidence; confidence of the out-maneuvered general in himself and in his army, of the out-maneuvered army in itself and in its general. In the case of Lee's army none of these consequences followed, when, for example, its huge adversary overlapped it upon one flank or upon both; or even turned its flank and took it in reverse — a thing which actually happened at least once in this campaign, when Hancock, on the 10th of May, at Spottsylvania, marched clean and clear around our left flank, and even, for a time, drove us in the fighting there. The men in our line fully appreciated what was happening, and yet there was not the slightest trepidation. Billy chanced to be standing near two intelligent infantry soldiers who were listening to and looking at the steady progression of the fire and the smoke of the fight, further and further in our rear, and quietly discussing the situation. At a s
Ulysses Simpson Grant (search for this): chapter 21
y, in slaughter, and in disproportion of loss Grant assaults in column, or in mass his troops rerally known or appreciated by us, namely, that Grant had attacked in column, in phalanx, or in massain refused to obey, and that at least some of Grant's corps generals approved of this refusal of treparatory? Is it not true that, years later, Grant said-looking back over his long career of blood during the war? Is it not true that, after Grant's telegram, the Federal Cabinet resolved at ler the great repulse it looked for a time as if Grant had some idea of digging up to or mining our pty at the outset, and he put hors de combat of Grant's army an equal number man for man. Mr. Swinton, p. 482 of his Army of the Potomac, puts Grant's loss at above sixty thousand men; so that Grant flank. From what I have read and heard of Grant, and the opinion I have formed of him, it is m his chief, but in it he, in effect, says that Grant did not maneuver against the Army of Northern[9 more...]
Adam Badeau (search for this): chapter 21
elieve what may be regarded as adverse criticism of Grant. I said the soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia did not generally consider Grant as a great strategist or maneuverer. His friends have entered for him a plea by way of confession and avoidance of this negative indictment — a good, sound plea. We cannot demur to it, and the Court of Impartial History will never strike it out as immaterial or improper, nor record a verdict that it is false. I have not before me just now General Badeau's life of his chief, but in it he, in effect, says that Grant did not maneuver against the Army of Northern Virginia, because he found maneuvering of no avail against that army. Other Federal generals have made in substance the same remark. Maneuvering differs from fighting as a force in war, in this, that fighting is purely physical, while maneuvering gets in its work largely upon the moral plane. Its most deadly and disastrous effect is wrought by the destruction of confidence; con
Joseph Eggleston Johnston (search for this): chapter 21
ms and laid him gently down. The home letters tumbled out of the full haversack and were dabbled with the blood of the postman; his brothers knelt about him, in a silent grief awful to look upon, and heavy-hearted comrades gathered up each his blood-stained package and gazed vacantly at it. During the great gathering of Confederate soldiers at the dedication of the Lee Monument, in Richmond, I told this story of his Cold Harbor lines and his old brigade to General Kershaw, when Gen. Joseph E. Johnston happened to be sitting near. It was too much for General Johnston. Tears started to his eyes and he reproved me sharply for telling a story that had in it only dead, unrelieved pain. He added that he must take the taste of that thing out of our mouths as quickly as possible; and, as sharpshooting seemed to be the theme, he would repeat to us a practical lecture on that subject which he once heard delivered by an expert to a novice. He said it was during the Atlanta campaign t
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 21
-our own loss was so trivial, so utterly out of proportion, and the one characteristic feature of the fight on the Federal side was not then generally known or appreciated by us, namely, that Grant had attacked in column, in phalanx, or in mass. The record of the Official Diary of our corps (Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. VII., p. 503), under date of June 3, 1864, i. very peculiar and is in part in these words: Meantime the enemy is heavily massed in front of Kershaw's salient. Anderson's, Law's, and Gregg's brigades are there to support Kershaw. Assault after assault is made, and each time repulsed with severe loss to the enemy. At eight o'clock A. M., fourteen had been made and repulsed (this means, I suppose, fourteen lines advanced). This is obviously a hurried field note by one officer, corrected later by another, in accordance with the facts known to the writer, that is, to the officer who made the later note, but not generally known at the time to the public.
Allen Moore (search for this): chapter 21
was a wonderful recovery. There was a gunner in Calloway's battery named Allen Moore, a backwoods Georgian and a simple-hearted fellow, but a noble, enthusiastic man and soldier. The only other living member of Moore's family was with him, a lad of not more than twelve or thirteen years; and the devotion of the elder brothe I could see the figures of the cannoneers standing out boldly against the sky. Moore was at the trail adjusting his piece for the night's work. His gunnery had bevalley and lost sight of the group, but heard Calloway's stern voice: Sit down, Moore! Your gun is well enough; the sharpshooting is not over yet. Get down! I roseew; but as I came up the sergeant stepped aside and said, See there, adjutant! Moore had fallen on the trail, the blood flowing from his wound all over his face. Htered shirt-sleeve and kissed the pale face again and again, but very quietly. Moore was evidently dead, and none of us cared to disturb the child. Presently he
Thomas Y. Scott (search for this): chapter 21
e had been a number of Yale men in the Twenty-first--the Sims, Smiths, Brandon, Scott, and perhaps others. A good many were gone, and those of us who were left were talking of them and of good times at Old Yale, when someone said, Scott, isn't it your turn to go to the spring? Yes, said Scott, submissively, I believe it is. PaScott, submissively, I believe it is. Pass up your canteens, and he loaded up and started out. There was a particularly exposed spot on the way to water, which we had tried in vain to protect more perfectly, and we heard, as usual, two or three rifle shots as Scott passed that point. In due time we heard them again as he returned, and one of the fellows said, Ha! they are waking up old Scott, again, on the home stretch. The smile had not died upon our faces when a head appeared above the traverse and a business-like voice caf yours dead out here! We ran around the angle of the work, and there lay poor Scott, prone in the ditch and almost covered with canteens. We picked him up and bor
Thomas Barksdale (search for this): chapter 21
e cup. Then he turned to me and asked my pardon for his disregard of my warning and his imprudence in getting shot, protesting still, however, that it was very hard indeed for a gentleman to walk in those filthy, abominable covered ways. The spring was perhaps the point of greatest power and pathos in all the weird drama of The lines. About this date, or very soon after, a few of us were sitting in the part of the trenches occupied by the Twenty-first Mississippi, of our old brigade,--Barksdale's, now Humphreys',--which was supporting our guns. There had been a number of Yale men in the Twenty-first--the Sims, Smiths, Brandon, Scott, and perhaps others. A good many were gone, and those of us who were left were talking of them and of good times at Old Yale, when someone said, Scott, isn't it your turn to go to the spring? Yes, said Scott, submissively, I believe it is. Pass up your canteens, and he loaded up and started out. There was a particularly exposed spot on the way to w
Edward Porter Alexander (search for this): chapter 21
t pour the water out to the Lord, as David did when the three mightiest brake through the host of the Philistines and drew water out of the well of Bethlehem that was by the gate --albeit, in a truer sense than David spoke, this water was the very blood of this man. It was about six o'clock in the evening of one of the days that followed close upon the great fight that there befell the company the very saddest loss it had yet experienced. An order had come to Captain McCarthy, from General Alexander, commanding the artillery corps, directing that the effect of the fire of several Howitzers, which were operating as mortars, from a position immediately back of the Howitzer guns, should be carefully observed and reported to him. The captain, appreciating at once the responsibility and the peril of the work, with characteristic chivalry, determined to divide it between himself and one of the most competent and careful men in the company. He was not the man to shrink, or slur over, or
pictures of Cold Harbor of 1864. The reader may recall our Old Doctor, the chief of our ambulance corps, who helped to rally the Texans and Georgians on the 10th of May at Spottsylvania, first exhorting them as gentlemen, then berating and belaboring them as cowards. No man who was ever in the Howitzers but will appreciate theconsidered it, non-combatant position, until that became unendurable to him, and then he joined the Howitzers as a private soldier; and that final flurry of the 10th of May was the first real fight he ever got into. Hearing someone say just as it was over that it had been pretty hot work, he asked with the greatest earnestness when one flank or upon both; or even turned its flank and took it in reverse — a thing which actually happened at least once in this campaign, when Hancock, on the 10th of May, at Spottsylvania, marched clean and clear around our left flank, and even, for a time, drove us in the fighting there. The men in our line fully appreciated w
1 2 3 4 5 6