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Daniel Stephens McCarthy (search for this): chapter 21
hooting the covered way the spring death of Captain McCarthy, of the Howitzers how it occurred on the line it had yet experienced. An order had come to Captain McCarthy, from General Alexander, commanding the artiller style, Who's that's dead? When we told him Captain McCarthy, of the Howitzers, he said musingly: McCarthy,McCarthy, McCarthy; why, that's the name of the folks that took care oa me, when I was wounded so bad last year. Well,McCarthy; why, that's the name of the folks that took care oa me, when I was wounded so bad last year. Well, here's the cannons from his hat. And so it was; his hat, as we suppose, had gone over the works, and his badnd then all, save his cousin, Dan, afterwards Lieutenant McCarthy, who went into Richmond with his body, turned the house. As the sash went up the man said: Captain McCarthy was killed on the lines awhile ago. If you wan that, as the night threatened to be stormy, young McCarthy had better go home and get some proper wraps and pavy battery of maledictions. The day after Captain McCarthy's death, my brother, being in almost the exact
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 21
Chancellorsville in 1863, and again from the Rapidan to Cold Harbor in 1864, cannot but set opposite to the picture just sketched that of Lee holding the front of Hooker's 92,000 with scant 14,000 muskets, while with about one-third (1-3) his numbers he utterly crushed in the right flank and rear of Hooker's great host. It shouldHooker's great host. It should not be forgotten in this connection, and in endeavoring to form a just estimate of Lee's operations throughout this campaign of 1864, that in the death of Jackson, Lee had lost his great offensive right arm, to which, at Chancellorsville and theretofore, he had looked to carry into execution his confounding strategies and his ove, of which different Federal officers have spoken under different names, in expressing their high estimate of the Army of Northern Virginia. It is this which General Hooker terms discipline, in his remarkable testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, already quoted, in the course of which, speaking of Lee's army,
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 21
musketry bronze guns Splotched and Pitted like smallpox epitome of the Campaign of 1864 maneuvering of no avail against Lee's Army did that Army make Lee, or Lee that Army? There were two battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. Lee, or Lee that Army? There were two battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaughter. It is undisputed that both McClellan's army and Grant's outnumbered Lee's,--Grant's overwhelminLee that Army? There were two battles at Cold Harbor, one in 1862 and one in 1864. In 1862 the Confederates attacked and drove the Federals from their position; in 1864 the Federals attacked, but were repulsed with frightful slaughter. It is undisputed that both McClellan's army and Grant's outnumbered Lee's,--Grant's overwhelmingly,--and it is asserted that the position occupied by the Federals in 1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twelve days; the battle Lee's,--Grant's overwhelmingly,--and it is asserted that the position occupied by the Federals in 1862 and the Confederates in 1864 was substantially the same. We were in line of battle at Cold Harbor of 1864. from the 1st to the 12th of June-say twelve days; the battle proper did not last perhaps that many minutes. In some respects, at least, it was one of the notable battles of history-certainly in its brevity measured in time, and its length measured in slaughter — as also in the disproportion of the losses. A
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 21
ught at Chancellorsville in 1863, and again from the Rapidan to Cold Harbor in 1864, cannot but set opposite to the picture just sketched that of Lee holding the front of Hooker's 92,000 with scant 14,000 muskets, while with about one-third (1-3) his numbers he utterly crushed in the right flank and rear of Hooker's great host. It should not be forgotten in this connection, and in endeavoring to form a just estimate of Lee's operations throughout this campaign of 1864, that in the death of Jackson, Lee had lost his great offensive right arm, to which, at Chancellorsville and theretofore, he had looked to carry into execution his confounding strategies and his overpowering, resistless attacks. This last suggestion was made as bearing upon a just and balanced view of the campaign in general, as well as an estimate of the ability displayed by Lee in the conduct of it. I ask leave to submit one other reflection of like general bearing, as well as tending to explain and relieve what m
Morgan Calloway (search for this): chapter 21
g wound in the temple. It was a wonderful recovery. There was a gunner in Calloway's battery named Allen Moore, a backwoods Georgian and a simple-hearted fellow,to see that the guns were properly arranged for night firing. As I approached Calloway's position the sharpshooting had almost ceased, and down the line I could see p. I descended into a little valley and lost sight of the group, but heard Calloway's stern voice: Sit down, Moore! Your gun is well enough; the sharpshooting is quiet sabbath evening, on the banks of Swift Creek, to witness a baptism, and Calloway, at the water's edge, tenderly handed this child to the officiating minister, y odd bullet holes through a dog tent, which was stretched immediately back of Calloway's guns, and he walked backward and forward between this tent and his pieces duer shot away. It is fair to say the same ball may have made two holes through Calloway's little tent; but on the other hand, many balls may have passed through the s
Jubal Early (search for this): chapter 21
ould not have dared to leave man for man in Lee's front; that it would have been utterly unsafe for him to do so — a statement I am certainly not prepared to dispute. Well, then; he might have left two for one in front of Lee, and yet have free from 13,000 to 36,000 men with which to turn his flank-and yet he failed utterly to turn it. The figures here used are those of Col. Walter Taylor, and are less favorable to Lee than those of most of the Confederate authorities upon the war. General Early, for example, says that Lee, at the outset, had less than 50,000 effectives of all arms under his command. It is not my purpose to accentuate this contrast in any unfair or unpleasant way, and yet an intelligent soldier of the Army of Northern Virginia, who fought at Chancellorsville in 1863, and again from the Rapidan to Cold Harbor in 1864, cannot but set opposite to the picture just sketched that of Lee holding the front of Hooker's 92,000 with scant 14,000 muskets, while with abo
Benjamin Grubb Humphreys (search for this): chapter 21
rned to me and asked my pardon for his disregard of my warning and his imprudence in getting shot, protesting still, however, that it was very hard indeed for a gentleman to walk in those filthy, abominable covered ways. The spring was perhaps the point of greatest power and pathos in all the weird drama of The lines. About this date, or very soon after, a few of us were sitting in the part of the trenches occupied by the Twenty-first Mississippi, of our old brigade,--Barksdale's, now Humphreys',--which was supporting our guns. There had been a number of Yale men in the Twenty-first--the Sims, Smiths, Brandon, Scott, and perhaps others. A good many were gone, and those of us who were left were talking of them and of good times at Old Yale, when someone said, Scott, isn't it your turn to go to the spring? Yes, said Scott, submissively, I believe it is. Pass up your canteens, and he loaded up and started out. There was a particularly exposed spot on the way to water, which we ha
of Kershaw's old brigade, which was supporting our guns at Cold Harbor, were three young men, brothers, whose cool daring in battle attracted our special admiration. We did not know the names of these gallant fellows, but had christened them Tom, Dick, and Harry. A day or two after the great fight a fourth and youngest, a mere lad, who had been wounded at the Wilderness, came on his crutches to visit his brothers, and they had a hard time getting him safely into the trench. We noticed they cahe sultry noon, except, of course, the spiteful sputter of the sharpshooters, all the men from his neighborhood were soon busy painfully scribbling on scraps of paper and in the cramped trenches, letters for Fred to carry home. Meanwhile, Tom, Dick and Harry surrounded their pet, as he evidently was; and indeed he was a lovely thing. We had not specially noted that the other young men were gentlemen. In fact, that did not so specially appear through the dirt and rags. We had readily seen
George Gibson (search for this): chapter 21
d. At first he could not think where he might get one, but it soon occurred to him that he had seen upon the streets within a few days a new wagon of John and George Gibson, Builders, and he went to Mr. George Gibson's house and waked him. Upon hearing the sad news, Mr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, bMr. George Gibson's house and waked him. Upon hearing the sad news, Mr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, but to go with him to the lines. He added, however, that the horse and vehicle were kept at a considerable distance from his house and that, as the night threatened to be stormy, young McCarthy had better go home and get some proper wraps and protections and meet him at an appointed place and time. As the boy reached home, or soonMr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, but to go with him to the lines. He added, however, that the horse and vehicle were kept at a considerable distance from his house and that, as the night threatened to be stormy, young McCarthy had better go home and get some proper wraps and protections and meet him at an appointed place and time. As the boy reached home, or soon after, an ambulance drove up to the door and his Cousin Dan and the South Carolina soldier bore the captain's body into the house. As soon as they had deposited it and helped the family to arrange it as they desired, Dan kissed his uncle, aunt, and cousins, and was bidding them good-by, when the old gentleman made signs for him
Moore was evidently dead, and none of us cared to disturb the child. Presently he rose,--quiet still, tearless still,--gazed down at his dead brother, then around at us, and breathing the saddest sigh I ever heard, said: Well, I am alone in the world! The preacher-captain sprang to his side, and placing his hand on the poor lad's shoulder, said confidently: No, my child; you are not alone, for the Bible says: When my father and my mother forsake me, then the Lord will take me up; and Allen was both father and mother to you; besides, I am going to take you up, too; you shall sleep under my blanket to-night. There was not a dry eye in the group; and when, months afterwards, the whole battalion gathered on a quiet sabbath evening, on the banks of Swift Creek, to witness a baptism, and Calloway, at the water's edge, tenderly handed this child to the officiating minister, and receiving him again when the ceremony was over, threw a blanket about the little shivering form, carried
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