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Horatio Rogers (search for this): chapter 1
liam B. Barton. Bird Island (E, 3d R. 1. Artillery, Capt. James E. Bailey, and E, 1st N. Y. Engineers, Capt. James E. Place), Maj. Oliver T. Beard. Tybee Island, Acting Brig.-Gen. Q. A. Gillmore: 7th Conn., Col. Alfred H. Terry; 8th Mich., Col. William M. Fenton; 46th N. Y., Col. Rudolph Rosa; 1st N. Y. Engineers, (Co's A and D, Lieut. Thomas B. Brooks and Capt. Frederick E. Graef), Lieut.-Col. James F. Hall; B, F, and H, 3d R. I. Artillery, Capts. L. C. Tourtellot, Pardon Mason, and Horatio Rogers, Jr.; detachment A, U. S. Engineers, Sergeant James E. Wilson. Confederate forces. Col. Charles H. Olmstead: Montgomery Guard, Capt. L. J. Gilmartin; German Volunteers, Capt. John H. Steigen; Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. T. W. Sims; Wise Guard, Capt. M. J. McMullan; Washington Volunteers, Capt. John McMahon. Of the garrison and armament of Fort Pulaski, General A. R. Lawton said in his report: As there have been no returns received from Fort Pulaski for some time, I cannot give
Martello Tower (search for this): chapter 1
ing to their labor before break of day and returning to camp after nightfall. The garrison of the fort was either unsuspicious or indifferent; at any rate, the natural difficulties of our task received no increment through interference from that quarter. The ability of their guns to punish impertinent intrusion had been already shown. Two soldiers of the 46th New York, which had occupied the island as a precautionary measure before the siege operations began, having strolled out to Martello Tower and light-house, Tybee Island. From a War-time sketch. the end of the sand point nearest the fort, conceived the idea of issuing a challenge to the enemy after the fashion described in the Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. The fort accepted the situation and replied with a shot from a Blakely gun which had recently run the blockade at Wilmington. One of the men was cut in two; the other retreated in disorder, and could not be induced to return and pay the last offices to his ill-starred
Egbert L. Viele (search for this): chapter 1
; and it was decided, without depending on the gun-boats, to tow the flats to the Mud River wharf, and haul the guns across the marsh. The landing was made without accident; and the pieces, mounted on their carriages and limbered Brigadier-General Egbert L. Viele, at the siege of Fort Pulaski Commander of the Union forces on Daufuskie Island. From a photograph. up, were moved forward on shifting runways of 3-inch planks laid end to end. Lieutenant Wilson, with thirty-five men, took charge. The garrison was found to consist of 385 men, the opposing land forces at Fort Pulaski, Ga. Union forces. Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, department commander. Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Benham, division commander. Daufuskie Island, Brig.-Gen. Egbert L. Viele: 6th Conn., Col. John L. Chatfield; 8th Me. (5 co's), Lieut.-Col. Ephraim W. Woodman; 48th N. Y., Col. James H. Perry. Jones Island (K, 1st N. Y. Engineers, Capt. H. L. Southard, and G, 3d R. I. Artillery, Capt. John H. Gould), Lieut.-C
Charles H. Olmstead (search for this): chapter 1
mpracticable. The Confederate commander, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, appears quite naturally to have been govson to the fort, with a summons to surrender. Colonel Olmstead briefly declined to comply with the demand, sad. At the entrance [of Fort Pulaski] stood Colonel Olmstead, the commandant. He showed the way to his ownade the rounds of the fort under the escort of Colonel Olmstead, who introduced us to his officers, and were t. . . . As soon as the surrender was complete, Colonel Olmstead turned to his officers and began making some r James E. Wilson. Confederate forces. Col. Charles H. Olmstead: Montgomery Guard, Capt. L. J. Gilmartin; ittle over 400 men, and commanded by Colonel C. H. Olmstead. The armament consisted of five 10-inch Columbiadaving. Such was the condition of affairs when Colonel Olmstead called a council of officers in a casemate; anns and the flag was lowered. Early in the day Colonel Olmstead had no doubt of his ability to silence every b
Alexander R. Lawton (search for this): chapter 1
ions against it absolutely impracticable. The Confederate commander, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, appears quite naturally to have been governed by the opinions of his superior officers; The officer in command of the department was Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton, C. S. A.--Editors. and the measures adopted for adding strength and safety to the work were of the most meager character. Moreover, General Joseph G. Totten, Chief Engineer United States Army, wrote, in reply to a letter requesting rd, Capt. L. J. Gilmartin; German Volunteers, Capt. John H. Steigen; Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. T. W. Sims; Wise Guard, Capt. M. J. McMullan; Washington Volunteers, Capt. John McMahon. Of the garrison and armament of Fort Pulaski, General A. R. Lawton said in his report: As there have been no returns received from Fort Pulaski for some time, I cannot give you the precise strength of the garrison. It consisted, however, of five companies, numbering a little over 400 men, and commanded b
Samuel R. James (search for this): chapter 1
ortar2600 yards. No. 7, 2 heavy 13-inch mortar2400 yards. No. 8, 3 10-in. Columbiads and 1 8-in.1740 yards. No. 9, 5 30-pounder Parrott rifles and 1 48-pounder James rifle (old 24-pounder)1670 yards. No. 10, 2 84-pounder James rifles (old 42-pounders), and 2 64-pounder James rifles (old 32-pounders)1650 yards. No. 11, 4 10-inJames rifles (old 42-pounders), and 2 64-pounder James rifles (old 32-pounders)1650 yards. No. 11, 4 10-inch siege mortars1650 yards. Tybee Island is mostly a mud marsh, like other marsh islands on this coast, varied, however, by ridges and hummocks of firm ground. The distance along the north shore, from the landing-place to the advanced batteries, on the sand ridge above mentioned, is about two and a half miles. Over the last James rifles (old 32-pounders)1650 yards. No. 11, 4 10-inch siege mortars1650 yards. Tybee Island is mostly a mud marsh, like other marsh islands on this coast, varied, however, by ridges and hummocks of firm ground. The distance along the north shore, from the landing-place to the advanced batteries, on the sand ridge above mentioned, is about two and a half miles. Over the last mile, which is low and marshy, and within effective range of the guns of Fort Pulaski, was constructed a causeway of fascines and brushwood. The work of unloading on the open beach the ordnance, implements, and equipments, and of transporting them to the batteries, was in charge of Lieutenant (afterward General) Horace Porter, a
P. H. O'Rorke (search for this): chapter 1
ns each, about four miles above the fort,--one at Venus Point, on Jones Island, on the north bank of the Savannah River, and the other on Bird Island, nearly opposite. This latter point had been fixed upon after a reconnoissance made by Lieutenant P. H. O'Rorke, of the Engineers, who, with Major Oliver T. Beard, of the 48th New York, had gone in a small boat up the river as far as the west end of Elba Island, within two miles of Fort Jackson. In addition, two companies of infantry, with three sand-bags, planks, etc., used in constructing the battery were carried,--about three hundred yards on a causeway of poles, and for the remaining distance by a wheel-barrow track made of planks laid end to end. On the night of February 10th, Lieutenant O'Rorke, of the Engineers, began the construction of the magazine and gun platforms, while Lieutenant Horace Porter, assisted by Major Beard, 48th New York, and Lieutenant James H. Wilson, Topographical Engineers, undertook the task of bringing up
Oliver T. Beard (search for this): chapter 1
er point had been fixed upon after a reconnoissance made by Lieutenant P. H. O'Rorke, of the Engineers, who, with Major Oliver T. Beard, of the 48th New York, had gone in a small boat up the river as far as the west end of Elba Island, within two mif the Engineers, began the construction of the magazine and gun platforms, while Lieutenant Horace Porter, assisted by Major Beard, 48th New York, and Lieutenant James H. Wilson, Topographical Engineers, undertook the task of bringing up the guns. 3-inch planks laid end to end. Lieutenant Wilson, with thirty-five men, took charge of the two pieces in advance, and Major Beard and Lieutenant Porter, with a somewhat larger force, of the four other pieces. Each party had two planks in excess ofon. Bird Island (E, 3d R. 1. Artillery, Capt. James E. Bailey, and E, 1st N. Y. Engineers, Capt. James E. Place), Maj. Oliver T. Beard. Tybee Island, Acting Brig.-Gen. Q. A. Gillmore: 7th Conn., Col. Alfred H. Terry; 8th Mich., Col. William M. Fento
George W. Smalley (search for this): chapter 1
sight of the captured work. There was a sea running which threatened at times to swamp the craft, and the rowers could make little headway against the wind and tide. In fact, the parties made such slow progress in pulling for the fort that the effort became rather ludicrous, and it looked for a time as if even the patience of a garrison waiting to surrender might become exhausted, and they be tempted to open fire again on their dilatory captors. among the visitors to the fort was George W. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, and now the well-known London representative of that journal. one of the captured officers asked me who was the person in citizen's dress, and when I replied that he was a war correspondent of the Tribune, exclaimed, what! that old abolition sheet? yes. Edited by old man Greeley? yes. and we're going to be written up by his gang? yes. well, I could have stood the surrender, but this humiliation is too much! from a photograph. t
to swamp the craft, and the rowers could make little headway against the wind and tide. In fact, the parties made such slow progress in pulling for the fort that the effort became rather ludicrous, and it looked for a time as if even the patience of a garrison waiting to surrender might become exhausted, and they be tempted to open fire again on their dilatory captors. among the visitors to the fort was George W. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, and now the well-known London representative of that journal. one of the captured officers asked me who was the person in citizen's dress, and when I replied that he was a war correspondent of the Tribune, exclaimed, what! that old abolition sheet? yes. Edited by old man Greeley? yes. and we're going to be written up by his gang? yes. well, I could have stood the surrender, but this humiliation is too much! from a photograph. though carefully and fairly well served, were from some cause practically ineffic
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